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back to article Google opens up pay-by-bonk Wallet to all credit cards

Google has extended its phone-based wallet into its cloud, allowing it to claim that any credit card can now be used to pay with a bonk of the handset. The arrangement, announced yesterday in a blog posting with suitable video accompaniment, means a Google-Wallet-enabled phone can make payments using wireless Near Field …

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Silver badge

But, but...

I already have a bank card, and it comes without silly bloody radio shite attached!

Still wondering how to permanently disable NFC, whether it'll be as simple as cutting a track. I really hope so because it's getting difficult to find a smartphone without it these days.

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Silver badge

Re: But, but...

So can the downvoters explain how proven-hackable NFC tech on proven-hackable smartphones is better than putting electrical contacts on a card that require you to physically slot the card in a machine?

Or is it just that you're addicted to the shiny?

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Bronze badge
Pirate

Re: But, but...

It's because we are Troglodytes who refuse to Move With the Times, and most stubbornly refuse to hand over our personal details, bank details, and our DNA to Big Brother Google and his lesser Cousins.

We are Holding Back the Future because we care about something silly as "privacy" and should be Logan 5'd at earliest opportunity.

Failing that, a downvote is the only way they can show their Righteous Indignation at our patently profit-reducing behaviour to Uncle Google et. al. in a safe and anonymous way.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: But, but...

Perhaps *you* should explain how NFC is hackable.

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Silver badge

"Perhaps *you* should explain how NFC is hackable."

perhaps The Register should?

or Engadget?

And it's not like these will be the only vulnerabilities, or the last. Sorry, but my bank card is going to be electrical contacts only, and I refuse to store it in a phone. In this case, simple is most definitely better.

Now perhaps you should explain the advantage of NFC over slotting a card in a machine, asides maybe two whole seconds?

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Facepalm

Re: But, but...

> Still wondering how to permanently disable NFC, whether it'll be as simple as cutting a track. I really hope so because it's getting difficult to find a smartphone without it these days.

You do know (with Android at least) you can completely disable NFC in the settings, right?

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Silver badge

Re: But, but...

There is a subtle but distinct difference between "completely" and "permanently".

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "Perhaps *you* should explain how NFC is hackable."

What you have entailed is nothing more than a vulnerability in the operating system and its' interface with the technology.

It's like saying that an OS is vulnerable because the TCP/IP stack can receive malicious packets. Most of those vulnerabilities have been fixed.

The technology for NFC communication is extremely secure. Without going into too many specifics, I can say that there's all manner of anti-playback and anti-spoofing technology. Unlike a physical card, where you can use a simple keylogger to capture all track 2 data (which has the full card number, cardholder name, CVV -- everything you need to engage in CNP fraud or card duplication), the same can't be done with NFC.

Bugs in the OS != bugs in the technology.

AC for obvious reasons.

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Silver badge

Re: "Perhaps *you* should explain how NFC is hackable."

So...

Why not use electronic contacts? Why wireless? Why make it so that someone can potentially hack you by bumping into you during the rush hour? Why not just make existing Chip & PIN technology work like NFC? Insert card into slot, you can pay for anything up to £15 without a PIN. Anything over needs a PIN.

Oh yeah. It's that shiny thing, isn't it? Sorry, but simple is better in this case. If future bank cards come with RFID in them, I'll be cutting them up and sending them back.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "Perhaps *you* should explain how NFC is hackable."

Because as been proven, electronic contacts are no more secure. In some cases you can read them without direct connectivity to the card, and there's the modern-day scourge of card skimming. Again, reading all track 2 data and opening the card up for CNP fraud or card duplication.

NFC transmits *none* of this data with modern payment infrastructure.

Again, it boils down to a problem of OS implementation, rather than the tech itself.

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Still US Only ....

So no fecking use in the UK.

:-(

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Still US Only ....

Which is good. Let the Americans dogfood it.

Given the spectacular security failures in the previous Wallet I don't want this until tested and proven.

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Re: Still US Only ....

Exactly. A bit amiss of a UK site not mentioning that it's unavailable here. (Although I've successfully spent Google's free $10 on coffee.)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Still US Only ....

"spectacular security failures"

Did you actually understand the article? Hardly, in any way, spectacular.

You need to be rooted, you need to allow a rooted application to install, it only gets details of your previous unwiped transactions not any of your card details.

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Silver badge
Thumb Down

They want my media in the cloud, they want my card details in the cloud, they want my whole life in the cloud!

No thank you, I will keep my cards in my wallet, and my media on my server, seriously I have over 1TB of media now, how am I supposed to stick that in the cloud on current speeds?

The cloud is overrated but required for so much now...

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Anonymous Coward

Terabytes of audio media in the cloud...

Audiosafe will sideload that for you if you want.

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This post has been deleted by its author

Really? If you think the cloud is overrated, you're using it wrong

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Unhappy

Rumour was we'd have it here in the UK before the Olympics. Looks like that really was only a rumour. :(

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Anonymous Coward

Sure, like I am going to trust GOOGLE

Hello? I surely hope that insanity hasn't yet set in.

Google, that shiny beacon of privacy defence is going to have insight in every single payment you will be making for the rest of your life? ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR BLOODY MIND?

You already have plenty of reason not to trust the kind of "privacy" Google provides you, and you would allow them (and, by extension, any fool who can whisper the magic words associated with uncontrolled use of anti-terror legislation) sight of your purchases and credit history?

If you say yes to that, let me know what you're smoking.

Because I'd like to avoid that. Big time.

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