back to article Kaminsky takes on censorship with info-mapping tools

When he's not working on DNSSEC, Dan Kaminsky is taking on censors, both in government and in private industry, with plans for a series of user-friendly tools that will map out where information is being deleted or blocked online. Last year Kaminsky released his n00ter tool, which mapped internet traffic speeds to spot any …

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Bronze badge

Wrong analogy

"Just as a newspaper is entitled to decide which content to publish and where, broadband providers may feature some content over others"

The difference is, I buy my newspaper to find out what (supposedly) trained professional think is news; I do not expect to be able to tell my newsagent "I want an article on subject X in the next paper". An ISP's job, on the other hand, is to deliver what *I requested* (via http/whatever). It is *not* their job to decide what I want to see/read/whatever, nor are they qualified to make that decision on my behalf.

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Anonymous Coward

I've always thought I have been subject of a form of mind control when I have been searching the web.

It explains everything, especially as to why we have so many incompetent Governments and world leaders....

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Stop

Re: Wrong analogy

Wrong again,

A SHOP may choose to not stock a certain paper.

A Deliver company may choose to not carry particular goods.

A ISP may choose to not stock a certain website?

The problem is Americans online are basically stuck in a duopoly, as we are in the UK (Virgin or BT with very few examples of others). If both choose to block something, everyone is screwed.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Wrong analogy

I don't think they can. BT can't legitimately stop me from dialing a valid number and talking with the party on the other end, based on their policy of not having a personal/corporate liking/disliking of whom they think might pick up the receiver. Court order or national security is a different matter.

I think Verizon think too much of themsleves and are trying to grant themselves powers that are not in their remit to hold.

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Bronze badge

Re: Wrong analogy

But if I have a subscription to a newspaper, the mailman doesn't get to choose whether to deliver it or not.

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WTF?

Re: Wrong analogy

Is it just me, or does Verizon sound like they're trying to claim free speech as a defense against charges of wire fraud?

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So is Verision wishing to be the Fox news of the internet?

Unfortunately its not 'only in america'

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Won't this make Verizon directly liable for their users viewing bootleg copyrighted material, since Verizon will be choosing what to show and what not, and they're choosing to let you view Bambi?

Or, perhaps this goes with blocking ALL video or audio not purchased from Verizon. That way they'd be okay!

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FAIL

Verizon is about the throw out the baby

If Verizon considers itself a publisher then that makes it liable for the content it delivers. If, on the other hand, it wants protection from that, then it must conceed that it is not a publisher and must not alter or control content.

What next, BT altering the conversations of those I talk with on a voice call?

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Silver badge

Re: Verizon is about the throw out the baby

How do you know this isn't already happening?

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Anonymous Coward

...and something else...

What Verizon is actually doing (IMHO) is messing around with someone elses first amendment rights; screwing up their free speech.

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Silver badge

Re: ...and something else...

This is tricky because a person's right to speak doesn't imply a right to listen.... does it? Unless it's covered (in the U.S.) under freedom of assembly. Which seems to be a stretch.

Don't Comcast (and others) already do this by intercepting NXDOMAIN replies.

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