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back to article Postgres-on-steroids wields bare metal in Oracle, IBM skirmish

Distributed database provider TransLattice is taking the fight to Oracle and IBM: it's breaking its TransLattice Elastic Database, or TED, free of its database appliances and selling it on bare metal or virtual machine instances. TransLattice was founded in November 2007 and came out of stealth mode in August 2010. The company …

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Interesting.

Not sure if it's going to make us unbundle all our RAC instances just yet but interesting none the less.

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Pint

Wanted...

DBA, for EMEA transactions. Must speak PostgreSQL, Mandarin, Arabic and 16 European languages.

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KA

HP needs a database?

HP already has a Postgres-derived, clustered database: Vertica. But wide-area replication is not (yet) a Vertica feature.

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tpm
(Written by Reg staff)

Re: HP needs a database?

That one is tuned for big data chewing, not transaction processing

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Re: HP needs a database?

Vertica is columnar store, not OLTP.

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Re: HP needs a database?

Like any cloud / outsource provider HP (ex-EDS) needs a db which can guarantee data and transactions stay in particular jurisdictions. Banking, finance, security and government all have regulations in most countries and you don't want to have to even think about applying for exceptions if you don't need to, even if exceptions are possible.

HP don't have a great acquisition history, but if I were them, I'd make sure none of the other big players can get in and mess this company up.

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Mushroom

$79,000 per node - wow

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Re: UKHobo

"$79,000 per node - wow" Not unusual in enterprise software. It's not unusual for one of our solutions using several million of hardware to actually have software costs more than ten times the hardware costs. I think the worst example I can think of was a cluster of two x64 servers - about £8000 in hardware - that ran one app that cost £176K for the two nodes, a ratio of 22:1! It must be the cost of keeping developers stocked up with frothy capucinos and stress toys.

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EnterpriseDB?

As good as the EnterpriseDB version of Postgres is (and boy it's good) it doesn't do any sharding like this. I wonder when you would choose this version of Postgres over the clustered EnterpriseDB version, and what features you lose from the sharding - especially as the EDB version seems to have more flexible licensing and drop in Oracle compatibility. Anybody with more experience in this type of thing care to shed some light?

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