back to article Pure Stream takes on AirPlay

Pure’s Sensia 200D Connect has been on its web site for a while, but now you can actually buy one. This latest incarnation of the company’s touchscreen Wi-Fi radio is a significant revamp on the original Sensia and showcases Pure Stream, which enables content to play wirelessly from Android and iOS devices. It’s an obvious take …

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£250??

Call me stingy,old fashioned or whatever, but £250 is approaching Yamaha/Onkyo DSP audio/video boxes.

This looks like a glorified speaker dock with just a sliver of functionality.

How is the £250 ever justified?

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Re: £250??

It does look a bit - 'Argos'. And that remote - WTF?

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Facepalm

"Avoid the Apple tax"

...and pay the Pure tax instead? What exactly is the point of that?

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Anonymous Coward

Avoid one proprietary system and go to another much less well supported system that costs as much?

How about creating standards?

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Anonymous Coward

I'm compelled to point out

The Airport Express is £90, so actually the Pure system costs considerably more.

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An Apple TV costs £99 and does video too. A no-brainer if you already have iDevices.

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Apple Tax.. extra revenue

I am not sure if it's what the author meant or not, but the Apple tax could also mean having to buy other Apple products to use their products rather than having some (if limited) choice. The Apple universe is not really something you dip your toe into, more its a full on leap into fruit-ville and has a price tag to go with it.

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Re: Apple Tax.. extra revenue

e.g. time machine.

You would think that saving files would be a standard part of the OS, but apparently not when its a duplicate of existing files for backup. Then apple want you to buy a grossly overpriced disk drive from them to plug into the network for that function.

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WTF?

Re: Apple Tax.. extra revenue

@P. Lee

>>e.g. time machine.

You would think that saving files would be a standard part of the OS, but apparently not when its a duplicate of existing files for backup. Then apple want you to buy a grossly overpriced disk drive from them to plug into the network for that function.

<<<

So route Time Machine backups to a USB HDD.

You don't HAVE to use an Apple Time Vault for network backup. My 2Tb Netgear ReadyNAS Duo (v1) has a Time Machine service built into it natively. My MacBook Pro (10.6.8) backs up to it over the network quite happily.

I'm sure other NAS boxes can also do this if you don't like Netgear.

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Re: Apple Tax.. extra revenue

I have an oldish PC running OpenSuSE and the Netatalk service, and I can do time machine backups to it without any problems. I'm guessing your Netgear runs Busybox with the Netatalk service. Most network hard drives run Busybox, and if they have Netatalk as well as the more usual Samba, they will work.

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Anonymous Coward

What really needs to happen...

... is that the DNLA crowd need to get their sh!t together and force compatibility without needing endless tinkering and seemingly scorpio being in phase with the moon. Surely better that than members starting to limit the implementation to their own devices. If they do that they're the Apple tax by another name.

If there's no VIABLE long term open alternative, the volume of IOS devices mean that Airplay becomes the standard with market weight, just as the iPod connector has in docks/speakers etc. and that's not good...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: What really needs to happen...

In practice though this simply will not happen, and is why Microsoft in the past, has been able to create de-facto standards and tinkering with existing ones to, on the whole, make things work better for the consumer. Similarly, Apple being in control of the hardware and software that runs on it, has only ever endeavoured to make the end user experience as simple as possible. And for that, they charge a hefty price, but obviously one that a very large number of people are willing to pay.

I used to loathe Mac users at university (back in 1990) because as an 8-bit programmer, I hated the fact that these imbeciles could use computers with so little understanding of their inner-workings (and I had to always end up fixing trivial issues for them). As a much older fart, with a family and far less time to spend tinkering, I now appreciate that having something that delivers 90% of the functionality I want, without any arsing about is bloody useful. To this extent, I feel that it's a benefit overall to have a company that can dictate where things are going and deliver products that work, rather than a committee of interested-but-competing parties that spend far too much time arguing about what the standard should be and then go off creating a bunch of semi-compliant but ultimately incompatible devices. DLNA is a fairly good example of this mess (although I believe the incompatibilities are mostly down to the plurality of containers, codecs and their various profiles).

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Re: What really needs to happen...

"Similarly, Apple being in control of the hardware and software that runs on it, has only ever endeavoured to make the end user experience as simple as possible. "

That may have been true before Apple became a content provider, but as a counter-argument I offer the iPhone activation procedure. There's no reason for that except to lock the user into the App Store. GSM already had device activation sorted ("insert SIM, switch on handset") without the need to hand over credit-card details.

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Anonymous Coward

Apple tax?

Considering Pure is part of Imagination Technologies (i.e. powerVR) of which Apple is a shareholder, I would have thought Airplay wouldn't be a problem?

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