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back to article TryStack pits ARM against Xeon in the cloud

If you are dying to see how software running on a bona fide ARM server stacks up against a Xeon server, then TryStack.org has some time slices running the OpenStack cloudy fabric that have your name written all over them. TryStack was launched in February, when the companies behind the open source OpenStack project – which …

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Anonymous Coward

"For A Free Account: Join Our Facebook Group" (trystack.org)

I think I'll pass.

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Happy

Re: "For A Free Account: Join Our Facebook Group" (trystack.org)

How are TryStack going to survive if the huge investment that they made in Facebook shares becomes worthless if you don't sign up?

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How many android phones does it take to equal an 8-core Ivy Bridge chip?

How did a smart company like Intel, with the best design and fabrication technology in the world, let a ho-hum processor like ARM threaten them? Their failure to anticipate the mobile device industry is an epic fail, Microsoft-like.

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4 Very good reasons

1) Intel were constantly looking over their shoulder at AMD

2) The "mobile" CPU market only became trendy when Apple released the iPhone, even then Intel looked with a "we no better" smile

3) ARM have a 10-15 year head start on Intel when it comes to ultra lower power chips

4) ARM licence their designs to multiple manufacturers

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The very nature of the x86 architecture, with it's requirement to remain backward compatible with it's 16 bit forebears, and a "Complex Instruction Set" (CISC) are the significant problems Intel have, and up until about 7 years ago, computing power was more important to them than consumed power.

The ARM was originally designed to be a very simple 32 bit processor from the outset, with a low transistor budget. Even though modern ARM processors are much more complex, the design ethos prevails. Low power consumption was actually a useful side effect.

Intel would probably very much like to discard the legacy components of the x86 design, but it's a problem, because backward compatibility is seen by most of their customers as the main strength of the processor line, as Intel found out with the Itanium, i860 and i960 lines of processors.

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Anonymous Coward

"ho-hum processor like ARM threaten them"

Rather patronising - it's certainly not in the same league as Intel's offerings for complexity but it's basic design is much more elegant. With it's small transistor count and low power AND the licensing AND Linux being available for so long it's more amazing that it hasn't moved into more areas sooner.

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