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back to article India unblocks the interwebs after protests

An Indian court has finally seen sense and toned down a controversial anti-piracy ruling which blocked access to a large number of legitimate sites in the country. Madras High Court clarified an interim injunction granted at the end of April to Chennai-based anti-piracy firm Copyright Labs, which wanted to stop the illegal file …

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Anonymous Coward

Enlightened India

Isn't it about time the UK took a more enlightened view to file sharing as India.

They make the UK legal system look behind the times and still living in the dark ages. India in comparison appears to have moved with the times and understands to modern IT world we live in.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Enlightened India

Unfortunately the rest of the world in only offering a knee jerk reaction, usually because those in the legal system do not understand IT.

Example the servers that were confiscated from Megaupload. There was a huge amount of data that was legitimate but the legal system was unable to differentiate between this and the illegal stuff. Now there is a counter case against the state government in the US.

Sadly Judges and the legal system have an average age of 60, and we're not brought up with technology. This appears to be a problem across the board, now in Japan where the punishment bears no relationship to the crime judging by the poor quality law making. Mind you Japan has a very unusual secretive legal system.

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Mushroom

@AC 06:04 - Enlightened India

"Sadly Judges and the legal system have an average age of 60, and we're not brought up with technology"

That makes totally no sense, just who do you think is engineering the technology? I will give you a clue, it's not the 16 year olds!

If you copy something that isn't yours you are committing an offence.

If you can make an operating system for less that a copy of windows then you can commit this fraud (I permit this). The same goes for filming and distributing a Hollywood blockbuster, or writing and producing a hit album. Of course, if you are able to do all of this and want to share then go ahead, and lets see how cash strapped you get in the process.

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Linux

Re: @AC 06:04 - Enlightened India

"If you copy something that isn't yours you are committing an offence." -- Absolutely not. Just because something is copied doesn't mean it is stolen. I just copied ElReg's logo from their website and I'm now storing it on my computer, like OMG.

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Thumb Down

Re: @Miek

Depends on your country or the agreement with the vendor. By rights, El Reg could site copyright infringement if you decided to use the logo elsewhere. I dare you to copy a USA seal and then tell the USA department that you are using it on your blog. Go on, according to you nothing will happen.

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Trollface

Re: @Miek

"I dare you to copy a USA seal and then tell the USA department that you are using it on your blog. Go on, according to you nothing will happen." --

Who said anything about reproducing the work? I was talking about copying; you seem to be confused.

Also, I can indeed use a copyrighted work in my blog. For example, I could write a piece a long the lines of "America's congress are a bunch of idiots" and use their seal as an image to represent them; claiming fair use.

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Linux

WTF Japan!

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Boffin

ok then..

I am just wondering how they are going to manage and distribute the block list. Is there a penalty for an ISP who does not fully implement the latest block list in a timely manner??

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