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back to article Mars has more water than thought

It's a big day for extra-terrestrial water: not only are there hints of water on the moon, but now Carnegie says that the mantle of Mars might have water concentrations similar to those found on Earth. Specifically, the researchers say that rocks in Mars’ mantle could have concentrations of water between 70 and 300 parts per …

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Joke

Well that finally answers...

why a bottle of water is $2.25 at my work. They've had a Martian supplier for years!

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Re: Well that finally answers...

It's unlikely, no-one has been to Mars yet and of the rovers they've sent none have returned (intentionally)

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PM.

Re: Well that finally answers...

$2,25 ? A bottle ?

This one must be from Pluto ...

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@NomNomNom

That's what *YOU* say.

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Holmes

Is anyone actually surprised by this?

Mars and Earth formed next to each other, from the same cloud of dust, at the same time. Guess what - they turned out fairly similar!

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Re: Is anyone actually surprised by this?

So what? Vesta and Ceres are even more closely related, and they are nothing alike.

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Alien

Re: Is anyone actually surprised by this?

Vesta and Ceres aren't planets though. Their method of formation is different from that of Mars and Earth.

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Re: Is anyone actually surprised by this?

Um...yes they are. "Dwarf planet" is still a planet. (Vesta is a candidate.) Both bodies have differentiated interiors, both achieved hydrostatic equilibrium (until that unfortunate catering on Vesta...) and with the exception of clearing their orbits, they meet all the requirements to be terrestrial planets. Vesta and Ceres both were altered by thier own Late Heavy Bombardment, and Ceres is thought to have geology shaped by (probably long dormant) tectonics. (We'll know soon enough; thanks, DAWN.)

And yet...both bodies are really nothing alike. For that matter, Mars and Earth aren't, either. Earth appears to be unique in that we were impacted by Theia late in the birth of the solar system. This re-liquefied most of the crust, dramatically changed mineral distribution - and the size of our radioactive core - spun the planet up, and gave us a moon large enough to almost count as a double planet.

That any of these bodies share anything but the most superficial similarities is astounding. Theia is probably what stopped Earth from becoming Venus; it would have blasted off an Early Earth’s atmosphere. What we had left then was low pressure enough that life eventually could transform it from Class Y to Class M.

Mars and Ceres were just too small. They can’t hold on to an atmosphere for long enough; it just keeps bleeding away into space. (Or sublimating!) Without a magnetosphere, solar winds slowly ionise the atmosphere and erode it.

Mars, Ceres and Vesta are all dead; the core quiet, the mantle cold. Their geology is a map of history; ours has been actively influenced by life – a lot of life – for billions of years. Life is so prolific on Earth that it has fundamentally altered not only our atmosphere, but the composition of geological structures ranging from sand to sedimentary rock, limestone to hydrogeology.

Mars, Vesta and Ceres are an interest record (and result) of things that crashed into them. And therein lies my point; from the same cloud of dust, with orbits a stone’s throw away, these planets had totally different things crash into them. The balance of minerals, the % of volatiles, the mixing due to differentiation…the formal is completely different for each.

So Mars has a similar % of water in its rocks to Earth? That is indeed interesting. I wonder quite how that happened?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Is anyone actually surprised by this?

writer - "the mantle of Mars might have water concentrations similar to those found on Earth."

martin - "formed next to each other, from the same cloud of dust, at the same time. Guess what - they turned out fairly similar!"

I don't see things like oceans from the Mars rovers.

I guess rocks and ozone are pretty similar by the same definition.

oh, the humanity...

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@Trevor_Pott Re: Is anyone actually surprised by this?

You said "Both bodies have differentiated interiors, both achieved hydrostatic equilibrium (until that unfortunate ** catering ** on Vesta...)"

Why - just how bad was the buffet?

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FAIL

Re: @Trevor_Pott Is anyone actually surprised by this?

Well, I believe the appropriate expression here is "herp, derp." :)

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Anonymous Coward

Absoluablutely brilliant subhed. A pint, sir, a pint.

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Holmes

Sedimentary my dear Coward.

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Happy

Comets watered Earth

They watered Mars too.

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Re: Comets watered Earth

Arrest those comets! There's a hosepipe ban.

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Pint

Of course they do

How would Martians make beer otherwise?

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Pint

@Winkypop

They didn't have to, us Dutch sent them Heineken (Youtube link) years ago ;-)

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Alien

Re: @ShelLuser

That was the worst action regarding interplanetary relations ever; I wonder why the Martians haven't unleashed horrible fiery death upon us.

Apparently they've found a way to put it to good use, running it through something like the Piss Processing Plant in the ISS, but optimised for horse urine.

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Given theres no intelligent life on mars

there would be more water than thought.

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Joke

Re: Given theres no intelligent life on mars

I'm not sure there's a great deal of intelligent life on this planet, either.

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Re: Given theres no intelligent life on mars

There are almost 7 billion humans that are classified as intelligent life

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Trollface

Re: Given theres no intelligent life on mars

Classified by the same idiots they're classifying...

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Pint

«Given there[']s no intelligent life on mars, there would be more water than thought. »

I believe that holds true locally as well....

Henri

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Pint

An apatite for H2O

A polite ripple of applause, sir.

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Go

I had to look up what the word apatite meant.

But it was totally worth it to get the pun in the sub heading :D

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WTF?

Looking forward to Mars branded Evian!

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Of course there was once life on mars. We are that life. We left, due to massive geologocal events that would leave mars unihabitalbe many moons ago aboard a massive space craft that crash landed in Africa. We then set about colonising and replaceing the idigenous life of earth. All our religous texts talk about magical lands that we were cast out of. The garden of Eden was Mars. The barren lands are Earth. We are the aliens.

scary thing is that there is a little part of me that thinks this is true!

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Were we the...

...Golgafrincham ark fleet ship B?

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Alien

Poppycock

As any fule kno, we travelled inside the moon, parked it around earth in a synchronous orbit then threw everything on a one way trip down the gravity well.

The eons may have reshaped our once gracefull and slender bodies, and the memory of our great exodus is long blurred into myth and fantasy, but our ancestral roots remain locked into our DNA, our body clocks still reverting to Martian time in the absence of contrary sensory cues.

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Not wanting to worry anyone

But hydroxylapatite is found in bones and teeth.

Has CMU been experimenting on Martians? And will their descendants swear vengeance on the Earthmen who disturbed their eternal rest and bring fire and destruction to our planet?

Now that would be a press-release.

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of course there is lots of water on mars

its used by that machine that arnie uses to create an atmosphere!

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Trollface

"Mars has more water than thought"

It's probably time to think about a diuretic.

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