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back to article HMRC Tax Calc

The Inland Revenue’s latest on-line tax calculator fell flat on its face when it was launched last week – swamped, no doubt, by starving millionaires desperate to know how much their 5 per cent tax cut was worth. HMRC Tax Calc iOS app   HMRC Tax Calc iOS app Quick input and summary calculation And even when it was up and …

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jai
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PAYE?

Seems strange the app should favour PAYE employees, because I'd think the majority of those people are not required to fill in a self-assessment form anyway.

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Re: PAYE?

It is useful if you want to know how your salary will translate into money in your pocket if you get a new job, a pay rise, or start a new tax year in your current job and pay.

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Anonymous Coward

Click, Click, Click....

.....and here's how much of your money we gave away to sponging mongtards.

Something I don't really want to know.

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Flame

Employers NI

That marginal rate of 32% does not include Employers NI which is money that the company pays to the state on behalf of the employee instead of using it elsewhere such as paying it to the employee. So it's effectively part of the tax grab. That takes it up closer to 40% for basic rate tax payers.

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Re: Employers NI

There's a reason why it doesn't include Employers NI, note the word Employers. I do envy you your naivity if you really believe that the employer would pass on any savings in Employers NI to the employee.

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Re: Employers NI

Ancient Oracle, perhaps you're the one showing naivety. We work so we can have goods and services. We use money so that we don't have to barter. The basic process is work - get stuff. The point is, how much of the stuff goes to the government, and how much does the worker get? You must include all the taxation points. The marginal rate is indeed 40% or so. But it's worse than that; when you buy your goods and services, there's 20% VAT to be paid. So in fact, the marginal rate at which the government taxes the benefits of your work is not 40%, but 52%.

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Big Brother

Simples

So it can't be used by anyone paying into an occupational or personal pension through your works. Does that sound like the death knell for those? Or is this just a way of saying "Hey look at us - we've joined the App Club".

Cynic?

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The comments in the Apstore..

Very annoying - the App does what it says on the tin.

People were marking the App as one star because "of the dole scum". Shoot the messenger much!

I think it's a great idea going forward and will develop more as time goes by.

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I have a better idea

Oblige employers to quote pay net of all taxes in job advertisements. Since they would probably have to work out the net amount on the basis that it might not be your only job, then you might even end up with more than you thought (unless the tax system was reformed, but that is another argument for another day).

I think of my salary as £17 000 p.a., because that is how much of it I get for myself. I don't really care about what the taxman takes, as long as I get something. It's enough not to have to decide each night anymore whether to catch the bus home, walk home and have the fire on or walk home and eat -- those are days I don't miss.

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Re: I have a better idea

The only problem is that net pay depends on things like tax rates and tax code. I suspect it would be even more confusing to be told that the net pay is £17,000 pa only to find that because your tax code has been reduced, e.g. underpaid tax in a pevious year, you only get £16,000.

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Re: I have a better idea

Sorry, but I think that would be a rather daft idea - simply because there are so many variables.

By quoting gross pay, it's known. No guessing about what assumptions they made etc, gross pay is gross pay.

Knowing that, anyone can work out what **their** net pay would be - taking into account all the variables as they apply to them. It's not like there's a a complete absence of websites where you can fill in a few numbers and it'll work it out for you.

In any case, you can do a very quick estimate very simply if you have a baseline to work from. Say you are looking at a job which pays £k/yr more - marginal tax rate is 32%, or near enough 1/3. So of that £3k you'll get to keep about £2k/yr. £2k/12 is about 1k/6, or about £160/month. So add 160 to whatever you take home now, and that would be about what you'd take home with the new job.

And the only "tax figure" you need to know is the marginal rate - near enough 1/3 until you are earning well in excess of £40k/yr.

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JDX
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Re: I have a better idea

The employer is interested how much they pay you, not how much of it you get to keep. They're not your mummy, learn to figure it out yourself.

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Thumb Down

A bit shit

(Based on the Android version)

* Doesn't show your monthly income (yes I can use a calculator but how hard is for the app to x/12 the result?)

* Doesn't allow you to specify your tax code (so it gives me a higher gross income than is reality)

I'll stick with ListenToTaxman thanks.

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Mushroom

It should not have been done

The problem with the app is not that it isn't comprehensive, nor that whatever it cost to produce was four times what it should have, as the total cost was a very small drop in a very large bucket.

The problem is the underlying approach to expenditure which this app represents. It is another form of vanity publishing which one can find throughout sectors spending other people's money. Do they ever ask themselves the question "if it were my money, would I use it in this way?"

For example, a better calculator has long since been available here:

http://www.moneysavingexpert.com/tax-calculator/ and it didn't cost the taxpayer (including the ones that didn't want it in the first place) anything.

The Treasury expenditure options appraisal requires proper consideration of "do nothing" not that you'd notice.

And of course the IT crew would not be able to self-actualise at our expense by producing apps for the iPhone

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JDX
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Leftie writers?

>>swamped, no doubt, by starving millionaires desperate to know how much their 5 per cent tax cut was worth

Really?

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Anonymous Coward

Going by the first image...

You make 25 grand A WEEK???????

What the shitting hell am I doing programming computers for when I can write some bollocks for a website and get my yearly salary in a WEEK?!??!

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Anonymous Coward

Does not calculate for £100k+ PA - why... can't they understand their own rules!

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Anonymous Coward

@AC 15:40

Rules? They aren't the ones who get penalised for not following them. More important question, why are they wasting time and money on iPhone apps, unless of course they are about to announce that a contract-free iPhone will be provided to everyone, free of charge.

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Anonymous Coward

January

> Back in January, I was utterly traumatised by the task of filing my tax return on-line for the first time,

Just for info and for anyone else leaving it to the end of Jan: you don't have to PAY when you file. So file online as soon as you are ready and have all the info to hand. Do this at your leisure, stress free, non-traumatised etc. (Don't worry if something changes: you can go back and make an amendment.)

Then pay in January (by cheque or bank transfer). (Or was it the amount that left you traumatised?) ;-)

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