back to article Apple quietly reveals iOS security innards

Apple has published a guide to iOS security, detailing in one place the various safeguards that stop perps p0wning fondleslabs and iPhones. The iOS security model Apple's diagram of iOS security measures The guide appears to have landed on Apple.com a couple of weeks ago without fanfare or PR flim-flammery, and opens with the …

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Anonymous Coward

Seeing this, maybe I should rush out and go Android.....

No, after a millisecond of thoroughly mad thought, I have already made the right choice.

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Anonymous Coward

Oh, you're the person who bought Windows Phone?

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Anonymous Coward

You can always buy an antivirus for your Android, no wonder they 'have to have' 4 cores to keep up.

Check out PC Advisor and the great android antivirus test....

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Trollface

Android doesn't need antivirus. It's just shit being peddled by the AV companies and Apple as they've seen a new sector they can exploit. I've owned 2 Android devices for a couple years and SHOCK HORROR! Neither have had any problems with malware or any other nasties.

This looks like Apple attempting to spread more FUD about Android. It's tried the whole "fragmentation" thing, that Apple insisted was a problem, but they were the only ones complaining about it, and now they're trying security. Although the only problems seem to be proof of concept or some dodgey "free" version of a game with 2 downloads.

Like a lot of things in life, your stupidity will determine your mileage. If you need someone to hold your hand (and money) Apple is there for you..

Icon for the people above, and myself.

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WTF?

@Durdy:

"This looks like Apple attempting to spread more FUD about Android."

The document makes absolutely no mention whatsoever of Android.

Clearly, "insecurity" isn't a concept limited to computers.

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@Durdy

I've owned 2 Android devices for a couple years and SHOCK HORROR! Neither have had any problems with malware or any other nasties.

---

I've lived in a dozen or so properties and never had a break in. I guess I don't need insurance, or door locks for that matter.

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Anonymous Coward

@Durdy

If you never managed to work out how to install apps you will, indeed, never have a problem with malware..

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Re: @Durdy:

"The document makes absolutely no mention whatsoever of Android."

“solid protection against viruses, malware, and other exploits that compromise the security of other platforms.”

OK, no mention of Android, but I'm pretty sure they weren't talking about Symbian..

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Anonymous Coward

I wanted to upvote, then downvote

then scratch my eyes with salt. I ended-up typing.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: @Durdy:

"OK, no mention of Android, but I'm pretty sure they weren't talking about Symbian.."

That's correct they were talking about IOS. As anyone with 2 working brain cells could work out.

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FAIL

@ Chad H.

Apples and oranges... you've never had a break in BECAUSE you've had door locks.

By your logic, if you'd lived in a dozen or so properties, never had door locks, AND never had a break in, then yes, your analogy would work - you don't need door locks.

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WTF?

Re: @Durdy:

“solid protection against viruses, malware, and other exploits that compromise the security of other platforms.”

You reckon that the OTHER PLATFORMS referred to by Apple were iOS? Well, that's an interesting reading.

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Anonymous Coward

Being so understated with it could almost border on smugness, but it's not.

I am sure Android users who are suffering a 700% increase in phone malware will have something to say.

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Anonymous Coward

A 700% increase on zero malware caught, is still zero.

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Anonymous Coward

700%, where did you pluck that number from? Did you know that 86% of statistics are made up on the spot?

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Anonymous Coward

And 90% are usually true.

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Alien

The problem is not Android vs iOS but more a control issue.

I am all supportive of having a choice and being able to install my own apps on my own phone when I can but when getting apps from the Play Store or from third parties it requires vigilance which the average person does not have in my opinion. Apple's stance was to take away the choice and lockdown thus preventing people from doing dumb things though it does not make 100% security.

The Play Store is no where near as much policed like the iTunes Store so malicious stuff gets through more often. Also just like Windows no matter how much protection you have, if you allow the choice then someone is going to be stupid and click that "I want malware" button

I bet you if Google decide to lockdown Android just like iOS it would be just as secure but then there would also be cries of foul play by people and they would also be killing their market as they would be shooting people like HTC in the face.

So the problem is not Android vs iOS but the problem IS in the way the App Stores are run and how the phones are managed/locked down.

Choice in the right hands is good. Choice in the wrong hands is a disaster.

PS: This message was sent from outer space 50 years ago

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Coat

But 50% of them are debateable either way.......

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Anonymous Coward

>So the problem is not Android vs iOS but the problem IS in the way the App Stores are run and how the phones are managed/locked down.

Ultimately both rely on end-users exposing and reporting malware - the human review of an iOS App is typically under 30 mins and concerned with UI, UE, App description etc - all other testing of API use and such is automated and easily defeated - really, it has been, is being and will be again.

When some 5% of iOS devices have been rooted by clicking a weblink, its difficult to be too smug. I thought Apple's genius here was implanting and focussing on the idea that jailbreaking made your device more vulnerable to attack rather than being evidence of a succession of fundamental and actively exploited vectors.

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Devil

Ah...

..this article would probably have Eugene Kaspersky cracking his knuckles in frustration! I mean after all, who on earth believed Apple would be thorough enough to release an OS with security safeguards that actually work, combined with the addition of an App vetting process?

TBH, some wont be overly surprised...

Sent from my Jaibroken iDevice...

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Thumb Up

Re: Ah...

You, Sir, win an Internet.

While the fanbois up there argue, in all probability this document has suddenly appeared in response to Kaspersky complaining.

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Grow up you lackwits. All the mobile OS are terrible, hole ridden jokes. Much like yourselves. Whereas they can take measures to improve you jackoffs will still be you tomorrow and forever. Might as well end it, it's better this way and you won't be missed.

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Go

iOS is 100% unhackable

Until someone actually gets into the cookie jar and starts spreading havoc.

No OS, system or device is unhackable. It is simply a matter of time and will to circumvent.

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Re: iOS is 100% unhackable

I think you're living in the realm of the straw men; this document does not claim that iOS is 100% unhackable. It merely documents that Apple has taken many of the steps that the industry advocates in order to secure their OS.

The only person you'll hear an unhackable claim from is an inveterate troll. You can point them at the latest jailbreaking tool if you want instantly to win that argument.

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Black Helicopters

Calm down dear(s)

More info here

http://www.nsa.gov/ia/_files/os/applemac/Apple_iOS_5_Guide.pdf

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Happy

Re: Calm down dear(s)

Am loving para 4.2.7

What does the NSA know that we don't?

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Facepalm

Re: Calm down dear(s)

They seem to be referring to the fact that most iOS devices can be recharged through standard USB ports (such as on a laptop or desktop), which also exposes a data interface between the device and anything running on the computer it has been connected to.

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