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back to article Boffins build all-silicon CNOT gate

One of the challenges of putting quantum computing theory into practice is replacing large laboratory setups with integrated devices. A group of Cambridge researchers says it has demonstrated that a quantum controlled NOT gate can be implemented all in silicon devices. The researchers, from Toshiba’s Cambridge Research …

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Alien

The next step towards Star Trek's "Computer? Please analyze..."

I know the Star Trek lore always refers to the computer as being banks of "FTL" (Faster Than Light) processors (which explains why the recipient of an intercom "hail" receives the message in "real time" while nobody else does) - but this will help make a quantum leap in performance.

Excuse me. Scott Bakula is at my door. Apparently, it is no coincidence that he starred in Quantum Leap, and a Star Trek series... and the fact that he's ringing my doorbell before I post this is further proof.

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Re: The next step towards Star Trek's "Computer? Please analyze..."

How long until we can solve all problems by reversing the polarity then?

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Joke

1.25x32.5mm

Not so much "chip" as "slab", then.

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When I was was a kid this was science fiction, I know it has some serious limitations now but any profitable leap in technology will always be perfected to a commercial standard sooner or later.

I just hope that when this technology is perfected it isn't patented for the next 100 yrs or so.

That would be incredibly tragic.

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Sir

I would expect that if it's patented out of Cambridge that it would also be licenced.

There may be a few tweaks held back from the patent, key elements to it's success to slow down competitors who have no scruples in copying who also have large financial resources - also I would expect that the first implementations would be militarily funded.

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Trollface

"the photons have to be indistinguishable so as to maximize their interaction"

I would says the photons [two quantae in the photon field, really] have to be indistinguishable so as to be able to interfere.

If they are distinguishable, you are back in the classical case. This quantum can be labeled #1, and this one #2. The cat is either dead. Or not.

In a vague sense, the universe's datastructure indexes stuff by the system's state, then history. If particles have the same state and exchanging their history does not allow you to distinguish them, they go into the same bin. This applies even to complex systems such as alpha particles.

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When the chip was disassembled, a microscopic bottle bearing a skull-and-crossbones symbol was observed and a tiny "meow" was heard.

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Happy

Early days ...

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Boffin

Are you sure that you heard a "meow"? Maybe you didn't!

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