back to article Dell ARMs up for hyperscale servers

Look out Intel. Here comes another ARM box to the microserver party. If people didn't want ARM-based servers, Dell wouldn't build them, and so with the launch of the "Copper" ARM server sled for the "Viking" C5000 microserver chassis we know that people want ARM servers. And this is not some experiment that Dell is doing, either …

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Linux

Ubuntu but not Debian

So, is this actually an original port by Canonical then, not using Debian?. I was under the impression Debian already had had an ARM port for some time. I'd rather use Debian stable any day for a server than Ubuntu - Ubuntu is based off Sid FFS. I cannot believe its more stable.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Ubuntu but not Debian

I think they mean commercially supported distro as opposed to stable distro.

Ubuntu has forced a >3.0 kernel for a while now whereas Debian unstable still comes with 2.6 does it not?

Debian has had ARM packages more or less since GCC supported it. Ergo, Ubuntu also had it by default.

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Re: Ubuntu but not Debian

Haven't checked but 3.2 has already been backported from wheezy (testing) to squeeze (stable) so I'd be very surprised if the default kernel for sid (unstable) is not 3.x

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Silver badge
Boffin

Re: Ubuntu but not Debian

Debian/Testing has had a 3.x kernel for some months now. Presently 3.2.17, so Unstable has certainly had it longer than that.

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WTF?

Re: Ubuntu but not Debian

Ubuntu LTS is based on Debian Testing, not Unstable (Sid) - FFS. Non-LTS releases are often based off Unstable though.

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Linux

Re: Ubuntu but not Debian

I'm using Wheezy & after running apt-get upgrade you'll get 3.2 at the moment. Debian is commercially supported, just not by Debian.org, - they just supply free support. True, if one were to use Debian stable then I'm not sure what kernel version its at, one might have to use a backported kernel to get a brand new one, but of course that's only if you need it.

I can see the advantages (perhaps) in using Ubuntu for consumer desktops, but for servers I don't know why Ubuntu would be better.

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Meh

Hmmm

Personaly I don't like there design and can see a few HD's having fun if all 4 bays are used.

Also 3 USB ports hanging off the cross-bar direcly seems a bit wrong and will only end in tears.

But at least they are offering there customers something, unlike alot of others.

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Bronze badge

RedSleeve

"And the Fedora Project is also doing tweaks to support ARM chips, allowing those who like RHELish Linux to experiment as well."

There is now an independent 3rd party ARM port-clone based on RHEL6 sources a-la CentOS/Scientific (no affiliation whatsoever with RH, CentOS, Scientific, etc.). It's called RedSleeve. So if Fedora is a bit to bleeding edge for you, you might want to check it out:

http://www.redsleeve.org

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Thumb Up

Re: RedSleeve

Wow, your spawned a whole new article and the only thumbs up was the one I gave you earlier.

It's a tough crowd.

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tpm
(Written by Reg staff)

Re: RedSleeve

Thanks Gordan. I told Reg readers about this separately at http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/29/redsleeve_enterprise_linux_arm/

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Bronze badge

Re: RedSleeve

Thanks! :D

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Bronze badge

Re: RedSleeve

Wow! Thank you. Now just to cross my fingers that my server doesn't go into meltdown. :)

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Linux

face palm

Intel got the StrongARM of DEC and later sold most of its ARM stuff to

Marvell

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Anonymous Coward

Calxeda not high bandwidth?

Not sure why the article says that the Calxeda interconnect is "...not the high-bandwidth interconnect that top-end Ethernet or InfiniBand switches and adapters would offer" when it provides 4 x 10 Gbps full-dupex links from each quadcore CPU (?)

Also, the "microserver" terminology would seem to be more applicable to SOHO servers (or GuruPlugs) than hyperscale systems.

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Go

4 sata, 2 gigabit and on a PCIe card

please!

Or match 1 gigabit-1 sata with interface bonding for a cheap, (almost) native-speed disk server.

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Facepalm

So, how exactly is this even a threat to hp?

It seems there might be a market, seeing as Dell are now following hp into it, but surely the "threat" is to those without a product in the space, like IBM? Even funnier when you consider that IBM holds an ARM license. Oh, I see, it's a TPM article - EVERYthing is a threat to hp! The sun shines, it's a threat to hp. It rains, it's a threat to hp. Dell makes an ARM server range....

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tpm
(Written by Reg staff)

Re: So, how exactly is this even a threat to hp?

The threat to HP is merely that it is the first and only real supplier of ARM-based servers up until now. Hence my subhead.

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