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back to article UK man to spend year in the clink for Facebook account hack

A British man has been jailed for a year after hacking into the Facebook account of a US citizen. Gareth Crosskey, 21, of Avon Close, Lancing, in West Sussex, hacked into his unnamed victim's profile on 12 January 2011, gaining access to an e-mail account in the process. The breach was reported to the FBI, which traced the …

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Anonymous Coward

lol @ todays "hackers"

L2 proxy.

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Coat

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

Yeah, he should have been behind at least 7 proxies.

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Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

He obviously never watched the film Hackers!

Hacking from your own home...

"Stupid, man. It's universally stupid."

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Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

I think you mean over 9000

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Paris Hilton

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

HAHAHAHHAHHH A BRUITISH DUDE GO TO JAIL FOR MESSING WITH A AMERICAN I LOVE IT

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Anonymous Coward

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

Oh dear Big Dumb Guy, your monika is unfortunately prescient.

I'll try to translate for the less moronic, and set you a small task of finding the caps lock key and learning how it works. It should keep you occupied for a week or two.

"HAHAHAHHAHHH" - Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha

"A BRUITISH DUDE" - A British man (Note the spelling of British)

"GO TO JAIL " - has been sent to jail

"FOR MESSING WITH A AMERICAN" - for interfering with an American (notice "an" instead of "a")

"I LOVE IT" - I'm a twat

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Thumb Up

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

"I LOVE IT" - I'm a twat

lol :)

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Law
Pint

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

"has been sent to jail" - has been incarcerated. ;) Or "sent to prison"... I don't think we use the term jail much over here.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

Who's Monika?

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Re: lol @ todays "hackers"

Yeah, did he mean gaol?

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WTF?

Deterrent?

"the result of the case should act as a deterrent to any individuals thinking of participating in this type of criminal activity". It certainly does. Back to mugging pensioners for fun then.

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Devil

Re: Deterrent?

"Back to mugging pensioners for fun then."

Only when they're asleep in their own beds.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-18104862

Spawn of Satan beacuse that's what these <expletive deleted> are. Grrrrr.

Colin

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Happy

Note to Home Secretary

Dear Mrs May

THIS IS HOW TO DEAL WITH THE GARY MCKINNON CASE.

FBI pass details to UK Police, they do investigation, gather evidence, and (if necessary under UK law) prosecute here.

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Re: Note to Home Secretary

+1 to you.

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Holmes

Re: Note to Home Secretary

Yeah, am somewhat confused why this guy was not extradicted; as this seems to be the normal procedure these days.

perhaps it is because Gary was guessing military computer passwords rather than facebook passwords (which according to all accounts are just as weak) . So its a bit more naughty.

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Re: Note to Home Secretary

Um the UK said there were not going to prosecute Gary. Maybe that's the difference. Perhaps, just perhaps if the UK said there were going to try Gary America would of said ok.

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FAIL

Re: Note to Home Secretary

would HAVE

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Re: Note to Home Secretary

IIRC the military passwords Gary McK guessed were, for the most part, blank. So even weaker than the average FB password!

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Note to Home Secretary

Perhaps because the evidence was weak or other factors like circumstances or mental adequacy of the individual indicated that a prosecution was not the best way forward. Standards of justice in US are lower especially for foreign citizens.

My note to Home Sec is that if US is likely to ask for extradition then don't choose not to prosecute here - whether found guilty or not it takes the wind out of the US' sails.

Meanwhile scrap this treaty or at least make it symmetrical.

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Anonymous Coward

12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

Seriously?

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JDX
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Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

Sending a message - computer crime is still crime.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

should have been longer given that FB is obviously the cornerstone of modern civilisation; not to mention the whole purpose of "the internet".

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Flame

Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

How about this message: "locking up people for guessing passwords is a waste of taxpayer money."

Note to Ms May: Not all "computer crimes" are equal.

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Mushroom

Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

12 MONTHS !

Christ. Assuming concurrent sentencing, you might as well give the copper bringing you in a kick in the bollocks and get your monies worth.

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Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

yup. he would have got less for burgling someone. which is worse eh??

the courts are so fucked up over here.

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Unhappy

Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

I thought the purpose was pr0n.

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@Citizen Kaned: Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

"the courts are so fucked up over here."

Well the view from afar (i.e. to me personally) seems to be that your political class, being an unhealthy amalgam of marxism and bourgeois moralism - oh but forgive me that is rather redundant is it not?! - are trying to decriminalize crime.

Perhaps in true soviet fashion, they are more concerned with what foreigners will think, than with anything else, and having a foreigner involved as a victim, makes them feign concern for lawfulness.

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Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

The yob who burgled my house and five others (whilst on probation) got 120 hours community service and took over a year to pay the 100 pounds compensation awarded to me. None of my stuff was recovered. By comparison, 12 months for illegally accessing a few FB and email accounts seems a bit severe.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'? @JohnG

Similar story here. The minky shit in my case didn't do any time, despite a string of burglaries. I think the cumulative stress we and all of his other victims felt is probably slightly worse than for someone who got 'fraped'.

At least I have a rather amusing video of him repeatedly attempting to fit through the downstairs hopper window. Although it would have been nice if he hadn't left the Velux window (escape route) wide open on a rainy day... oh, and if the police hadn't sprinkled carbon powder over all of my carpets, and porous furniture... oh and...

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Re: @Citizen Kaned: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

@ Turtle

Marxism? Exactly how far away are you? Mars?

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Re: 12 months porridge for a FB 'hack'?

All depends on the intent and who the unnamed American is.

If he was just trying to frape a friend into having a status of "I blow goats lol" then its usually a slap on the wrists.

If he was trying to post as Obama that 9/11 was faked or get someone's personal info for nefarious gains then his feet wouldn't have touched.

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bit harsh innit

a year in clink. more than you get for nicking a car.

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Re: bit harsh innit

More than you'd get for an average GBH too, at least for a first offence.

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Re: bit harsh innit

Yep you'd probably get a suspended sentence as well.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: bit harsh innit

It's more than you get for *killing* a cyclist.

But that's rather more to do with the fact that driving offences are scandalously under punished.

http://thecyclingsilk.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/inquest-into-death-of-svitlana.html

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Anonymous Coward

So you get less prison time for assault, mugging, robbing a property, carjacking, fraud, <insert more here> than you do for logging into someone else's online account? UK law is pathetic. Next they will be imprisoning people for not paying their tv licence while muggers get community service....oh wait...doh!

Makes you wonder why the FBI were involved as it is doubtful they bother to investigate all the cases of a single account hack.

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Stop

Indeed, the only hope of justice seems to be if the mugger also logs into your Facebook account...in America...

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FBI investigated one hacked FB account. Account of a Hollywood celeb maybe?

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Anonymous Coward

or maybe it was an FBi account

and FB is just a cover...

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Re: celeb

It's emerged the victim was Selena Gomez, actress and girlfriend of gerbil-faced popular music icon Justin Bieber.

C.

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Meh

Details of the crime?

So they accessed the account. Yes, that is illegal, but if all they did was manage to guess the person's password and log in there wouldn't have been much in the way of warning flags. the more interesting part of the story would be: what did they actually do while there? Did they post nasty comments, pictures, or make any threats?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Details of the crime?

I doubt he even did that. I bet he guessed the person's "security" question. Probably from information publicly available on said account...

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g e
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Facepalm

Better off dealing dope, then

Doubt you'd get 12 months for that

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wow... a year for 'hacking' a facebook account. I bet it was sarah palin. She was probably using the same password she'd used on her hacked gmail account still.

I would get less than that for punching a kitten.

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ACx

Why was this prosecuted in the UK, when certain people simply must be extradited?

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So, stealing someone's private info gets you in to a UK court, on the other hand showing someone where they can download a US film gets you extradited with the probability of multi year imprisonment.

What a distorted system, where possible civil infringement against a $$$ corporation is treated more seriously than a criminal act against an individual.

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There must be more to this................

There must be considerably more to this than is being published. This lad lives just down the road from me and 12 months is a stupid sentence even for British justice (and all its stupidities) for just breaking into someones facebook account. It's interesting how none of the media reports explains why the FBI was involved or whose facebook account it was. I can only assume it's someone important (in whatever way you want to consider important).

Obviously, what he did whilst in possession of the account is also a contributory factor and again, there is a lack of information in the press. Presumably all this means that whatever he did was very embarrassing for the person in question and therefore is being hushed up, albeit odd that the press are playing ball.

Given that no details of previous similar offences have been revealed, it would take a bit to get this sort of sentence through other crimes on a first offence. Whatever it was, it must have been either very bad, or very good!!

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Joke

Re: There must be more to this................

He hacked into Big Dumb Guys Facebook account - and he would have gotten away with it too if it wasn't for the fact he typed a status update that wasn't all in upper-case!

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Re: There must be more to this................

The PCeU statement says that as well as unauthorised access, he was done for "...unauthorised acts with intent to impair operation of or prevent/hinder access to a computer", which suggests that he did something when he got in (though it might have been something as simple as changing the account password, I suppose).

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Anonymous Coward

Re: There must be more to this................

Do us a favour and don't give that arsehole BDG any more attention, eh?

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