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back to article IEEE commits Wi-Fi refresh to standard

Wi-Fi standards have received a refresh that formalizes various technologies developed in the last four years under the IEEE’s standards processes. With the publication of 802.11-2012, the standards body brings better security, smoother cellular handoff, QoS, and mesh networking into the fold. It’s just the fourth major refresh …

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Cellular handoff, QoS, Mesh networking AND high power?

Sounds like a mobile carrier's nightmare in the making.

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Coat

Re: Mobile carrier's nightmare in the making

Pretty doubtful, since the standard still only has 3 "real" channels available without bleed over.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Mobile carrier's nightmare in the making

Does it? It seems the standard includes the previous 2.4GHz and 5Ghz channels too.

I would check but unfortunately the standard costs $5 to download.

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"improved radio resource management"

OK, now that bit definately gets my thumbs up. I hope this means that different APs / clients within range of each other co-operate on the limited bandwidth available, but maybe that would be assuming too much? Anyone with any knowledge of what they mean?

The other thing that I've been waiting for (if anyone has any way of putting suggestions), is for a security standard for open APs where the client conencts to the AP in the open, they exchange keys and then switch to encrypted communications. No need to enter a 500 character pass phrase in each bar/cafe, but your comms are reasonably secure (at least from WiFi slurpers) without any hastle, and it's fully automatic for the masses.

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Re: "improved radio resource management"

"The other thing that I've been waiting for (if anyone has any way of putting suggestions), is for a security standard for open APs where the client conencts to the AP in the open, they exchange keys and then switch to encrypted communications. No need to enter a 500 character pass phrase in each bar/cafe, but your comms are reasonably secure (at least from WiFi slurpers) without any hastle, and it's fully automatic for the masses."

The big stumbling block has always been the actual key exchange. Unless this is secured, the communique can still be sniffed by sniffing the key. Don't look at it from the angle of someone passing and sniffing your communique but rather someone waiting for you to come in and then sniffing the conversation from start to fnish. As I understand it, physica only allws two ways to prevent a key from being sniffed: use an already-trusted channel (but that presents the chicken-egg problem when you're trying to establish a secure channel in the first place) or use a side channel (which may not be available to both parties).

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Anonymous Coward

Re: "improved radio resource management"

this can be solved (partially) by an obfuscated key exchange such that it looks like regular http traffic but is infact steganography - hiding the key exchange in plain sight. maybe simulating web traffic to several servers - but assembling a key from the contents of the pages sent/received. OBFUSCATION! is a key to many of the problems of the same focus on the start-up of a VPN SSL/SSH set-up.

of course, those work-factor redux agents might already have a patent on all of this?

personally I've just ordered a 20 watt amplifier for the 3.6GHz band and I'm going to enjoy seeing how far away I can send my SSID - New Zealand by Moonbounce would seem possible!!!!

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Re: "improved radio resource management"

But you're trying to establish a secure channel between two strangers. The only way you can do that is by a standardized form of communication. Otherwise, the initial link can't be established. Furthermore, since it's a standardized communication between two untrusted individuals, there's no way to detect a third stranger butting into the conversation at the very beginning, either by sniffing out the key (since the key exchange is necessarily standardized, what Bob need to read the key is also what Mallory needs to intercept it--they're one and the same) or by hijacking the initial communique and performing a Man-In-The-Middle attack.

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Anonymous Coward

OMFG. 20W output....

what idiot rubber stamped this idea ??? and how much was he bribed to do it?

having a 20W signal blasting out of a monopole antenna is a disaster waiting to happen.

god help anyone living nearby to it, they are (to put it bluntly) FUK3d!!!

if 0.6W is enough to cause cancer what the hell will 20W do, (probably cook passing birds and insects)

Why not dump some harmonics on it of say 7-17hz place the mast at a major intersection and wait to see the accidents and fatalities from heart attacks, blackouts, and other associated neurological effects rack up within 500m.(it aint gonna be pretty)

im off to get more effin tinfoil before it sells out....

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Re: OMFG. 20W output....

Pardon, but CB radios have been transmitting at 4W (it's part of the standard) for decades. And what about people who have to work around transmission towers, What about microwave ovens? Most tellys, and so on? And then there's the sun, which transmits throughout the EM spectrum, including in the radio bands. We basically get exposed to radio frequencies everyday, everywhere. Have been since before Marconi, so why worry now?

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