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back to article Moon at annual perigee this weekend

If you stumble out of the pub this weekend and the moon appears unusually large, there's no need to swear off the strong stuff. Instead, contemplate the wonder that is Lunar perigee, the moment at which the moon approaches closer to Earth than on any other day of the year. This year's perigee takes place on May 5th and 6th, …

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Anonymous Coward

All we need is more rain and small tidal surge

Right, so from my selfish UK perspective all that we need in this case is a bit more rain and a small storm surge. That will make for a lovely puddle in the part of the country which the Thames barrier is supposed to protect :) So far the forecast looks spot on - after a brief respite today, there will be rain, rain and rain all the way till next Wednesday.

Time to inflate that boat I guess.

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Go

Re: All we need is more rain and small tidal surge

A perfect storm?

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Anonymous Coward

Re: All we need is more rain and small tidal surge

I thought you were in the middle of a drought (according to the Met)

/sarc

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@Pete

Quick, someone phone Roland Emmerich! There's a disaster film in there somewhere!

When you think that the Moon is the closest celestial body to us and then realise it's still 350,000km away, it's a little disheartening to think how far we'd have to go to reach somewhere like Mars.

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Paris Hilton

Wow what a terrific audience

Anyone else think the voice over on that video could be Jimmy from South Park without the speech impediment?

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Unhappy

10-1 on that

as usual, its cloudy!!!!!

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Re: 10-1 on that

I think it might be my fault.

I bought a telescope the other week and I haven't seen clear sky since.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10-1 on that

You did take the lens cap off? Just checking...

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Happy

Re: 10-1 on that

Ah, the well-known cloud magnet effect. My scope is 15-16 years old, but every time I buy a new eyepiece clouds rush in.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: 10-1 on that

Many years ago, I went to Kenya for 3 weeks, and (being a keen photobotherer) thought it would be wonderful to catch the setting sun, dipping below the horizon, whilst the sky was aflame with colour.

It clouded over 5pm *every* night I was there. In the end I had to get up at 6am, and snatch a sunrise, but it wasn't the same.

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Re: 10-1 on that

Isn't a sunrise just like a sunset but in reverse?

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Stop

Re: 10-1 on that

>Isn't a sunrise just like a sunset but in reverse?

No - different colour temperature..

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Boffin

Re: 10-1 on that

At sunset there's a lot more dust and atmospheric disturbance dispersing the shorter wavelengths, making sunsets appear a lot redder than sunrises. On land that is; if you're out on the ocean you're less likely to notice much difference between them.

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Close approach of the moon?

I'll just take my hat off, then.

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Re: Close approach of the moon?

''I'll just take my hat off, then.''

What ? To replace it with a tin foil one to protect yourself from the moon's rays ?

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So what

There's perigees many months of the year. We're gardening using an astrological calendar and will be leaving well alone on Sunday and Monday.

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MJI
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Re: astrologoly astromony

I didn't know what they were when I was younger and thought that they were all what now know are astronomers. Then I saw a L on TV wafflling on about contellations and what will happen, and thought what an idiot (small children do not know many suitable words) then knew what the differences were.

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Re: So what

Rob,

you're right. So I changed the headline to "annual perigee". Silly of me not to do it when I wrote the story for the first time.

S.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: So what

"We're gardening using an astrological calendar"

I think a spade might be faster !

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FAIL

Sole satellite?

"when our sole satellite will approach to within 356,953 km of the Earth.". Our only natural satellite maybe, but only satellite?

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Boffin

Re: Sole satellite?

Not even the sole natural moon... how many are we up to now?

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Pint

Re: Sole satellite?

Well, if the researchers at QI are to be believed, then five.

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Re: Sole satellite?

Only one natural satellite, QI are being silly and playing with definitions. The other objects they refer to are satellites of the sun.

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Confused (what else is new?)

The moon has a perigee once a month, and once a year* this roughly coincides with a full moon, when the effects of lunar and solar gravity are aligned. So (ever so slightly) higher tides than a normal high tide that happens every two weeks. But does the tidal effect from the Sun's gravity also compress the lunar orbit to produce a marginally closer perigee than the one that occurred last month? And is this greater than the companion effect that should happen when perigee closely coincides with the new moon?

* The alignment of the perigee is fixed as Earth follows its orbit around the Sun.

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Any news...

on increased werewolf activity???

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Happy

Re: Any news...

Don't be a lunatic.

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That's no moon....

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Anonymous Coward

FTFY

"If you stumble out of the pub this weekend and the moon appears unusually large, there's no need to swear off the strong stuff." It'll be an optical illusions and in no way related to the full moon.

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Anonymous Coward

Only very slightly different?

We're supposed to be impressed with a tiny percentage difference to what's usual?

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What's that in English money?

356,953 km ??? I remember whenit was always about 240,000 miles.

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Boffin

Re: What's that in English money?

10,000,000 el reg t-rex's or London buses, I think you'll find.

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Re: What’s that in English money?

Martin, thanks to The Universal Cambist, I reckon that 356,953 km comes to 73,933 leagues, eight shillings, ninepence.

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Alien

I for one welcome our Clanger overlords.

(duck! incoming soup)

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Facepalm

What is actually happening...

Bruce (almighty) will be getting jiggy with the wife again

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Windows

Lucky me!

Friday night forecast is clear skies.

However, I fail to see how a thousand Km out of 350,000 - odd makes much difference.

Sir Patrick Moore* will be happy!

*Met him once, asked for his autograph. Demanded mine in exchange! Then he looked after my 2-month-old daughter when I had to go for a pee! Splendid fellah! This at a Herschel centenary at the Royal Society in Pall Mall

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Re: Lucky me!

Met him too.

As whacky as the crazy-haired mayor of London, but wthout the pretentiousness.

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Statistics...

"the NASA video below says that tides will rise only a few centimetres and that there's no link between increases in crime and close moon approaches."

That's because NASA are ignoring the effect of tidal forces on statistics. Our base reference is pulled out of whack by the moon's gravity. If you think about it, all our mountains shrink at high tide, right? We measure our mountains by height *above sea level*, after all.

Now if tides do the same thing to our base reference of crime statistics, then a "no change" is actually an increase proportionally equal to the tidal distance, thus explaining the disparity between NASAs view and popular perception.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Statistics...

I'm pretty sure mountains are measured against mean sea level.

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Re: Statistics...

Tidal forces are effected by statistics?

So, at low tide the mountains grow.

Which part of the bible are you quoting?

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Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Moooooonnnnn!

How many are tempted to join in when falling out of said hostelry?

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Pint

EME Moon-Bounce

For those interested, look-up amateur ('Ham') radio Earth Moon Earth (EME), or Moon bounce. Some Ham radio hobbiests actually bounce (typically VHF/UHF) signal off the Moon's surface, communicating in Morse code.

I expect there to be a peek in such activity during this perigee period.

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Joke

Re: EME Moon-Bounce

Sadly the HAM signals will be drowned out by all the powerline networks using the moon to connect up and create skynet.

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Re: EME Moon-Bounce

>Peek in activity

I'm sure the usual intelligence-gathering agencies will be peaking as well.

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Anonymous Coward

Ful moon

>While some say that these close approaches, or "supermoons" as some insist on calling them, produce odd behaviour, monster tides, earthquakes and other phenomena

Odd behaviour? Regularly driving around Madrid, although the standard of driving is incredibly bad, I can always tell when there is a full moon as the increase in suicidal manouvres is quite noticeable.

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WTF?

We are all doomed!!!!!!!..........

....Oh, er..... no. we are not after all. That was just what some moron said about global warming.

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Windows

Bolloc*ks

It's pissing down. Dammit!! OK,I'll try Sir Patric Moore's April 1'st technique of jumping at precisely perigee, and see if I can be weightless for a moment...Screw it, I'l let Girlie buy me another pint. Seen one moon, seen 'em all.

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