Feeds

Reg Picture puzzler

This topic was created by Chris Mellor 1 .

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Reg Picture puzzler

This is the place for public thoughts and views about the Reg Picture Puzzler story, which should be up on the Reg' shortly.

0
0
WTF?

Re: Reg Picture puzzler

From an ex-DECcie and ex-EE (Soton Uni)...

1. An IBM 704 logic module from the mid-50s – difficult to know which actual module this is but it looks like a set of ECC82s which are in a multiplier.

2. Packard Bell 250 from early 1960s

3. PDP 12 from late 1960s – worked on those

4. PDP 8/E from the 70s – still got a manual from that!

5. DEC/Digital PDP-10, model KL-10 also known as a DECsystem 10 from mid-to-late 70s complete with its power controller

6. a few bits of core memory – used to be made by hand in the far east – the first case of off-shoring technology?

Looking at this, it looks like it comes from a Honeywell DP-516 or one of its earlier siblings – a 316? – I worked on one of these in the electronics dept at Southampton Uni in about 1976 – it also had a “drum memory” and a fantastic high speed optical paper tape reader…

They also had a Modcomp MAX4 there which replace the DP516 eventually.

7. A diode gate array – they look like IN914s or IN4148s, but could be pretty much any small signal silicon diode – diodes were (and still are) used for “wired-OR” logic.

8. This is definitely DEC again – probably a DECsystem 10, maybe a KL-10 – the colours used give it away - DEC even made their wire-wrap match the company colours…

Out of interest, to try to make some of their cabinets less boring, for some of the PDP-11 range they introduced “environmental side panels” that were garishly horrible in what can only be described as a 1970’s way…

9. We’re back to Honeywell here – when this system and the Modcomp mentioned in #6 were patched, engineers used to come in and re-do bit of the wire wrap. Them was the days… Still got my own wire-wrap tool and some spools of that nice Teflon-coated, silver plated, fine wire that was used.

10. Back to DEC PDP-8 again – These are “Flip Chips” all dating from the late ‘60s to early ‘70s - The “M” in the numbering stood for “Magenta”! There’s a surprise…M310 is a delay line (timing module), M360 is a variable delay line (another type of timing module), M113 & M115 are NAND gates, M216 is a 6 unit flip-flop (bistable), M617 is a set of 6 NOR gates. The timing modules were used to get round race-hazards in gate time – an early kludge basically. Flip chips were eventually discontinued as they were unreliable for a number of reasons, mainly due to the edge connectors – we were always having to reseat them.

11. This is obviously from a drum line printer from an old mainframe. It looks like the ones used in the ICL 1904T series units, i.e. mid ‘70s again but can’t be sure…

Still got some of this sort of just in my workshop (aka shed)...

1
0
Silver badge

Err...

Not the comments part of the article itself? [I mean here]

0
0
Holmes

Sixth picture -

Could be from lots of machines. I have a bank of these, from a PDP-8. Slightly chopped up so I could take detail photos.

First picture: Memory bank from some machine. Univac, maybe?

Picture 5: Google/ Cnet shows the image this was chopped out of.

Picture 9: closeup of my final project for a digital design lab? Although most of the board had a wider variety of colors (sorry, "colours").

Picture 11: ah, the fun you can have with a band printer in a self-serve computer lab :-) From artistic (dancing printers) to pornographic (feelthy peectures for real) to simply destructive (paper jam! at 5 pages/second!)

[where's the rusty old codger icon?]

1
0
Paris Hilton

Too much PDP porn and not enough ICL

No It Comes Late porn, no punched card readers. For shame on you. WHat next - sourcing all the questions of one site and keeping them in the same order.

0
0
Silver badge

It's a no brainer

Particularly since all pictures were taken straight off another website where they are linked to descriptions of the actual devices:

http://www.rcsri.org/gallery/

1
0
FAIL

Haha, how lazy can The Register get? Laughable! :)

2
2
Headmaster

RCS/RI Member

There is a need here to clear the air. Several posters have taken exception to the posting of these pictures because they are available at www.rcsri.org, the website of the Retro-Computing Society of Rhode Island. The implication is that The Register snagged, scarfed or otherwise somehow misappropriated these images from us. To the contrary, the RCS/RI has been working closely with Chris Mellor of The Register to make these images available to the wider world; to those folks who would not otherwise know of the RCS/RI. We are rather delighted to find out that we are already better known than we'd expected, and we hope that this article will make us even better known. The RCS/RI is an all-volunteer private organization, funded by its members (Although if you'd like to kick in a few bucks, let us know!), that collects, refurbishes and operates antique computers, generally but not exclusively associated with New England. We feel that the preservation of our technological heritage is well worth the pain and trouble that doing so requires. It's also a lot of fun. We have an Open House on the third Saturday of every month at our facility at the Atlantic Mill in Providence, RI, and we invite you to come visit our collection. And thereby to see for yourself what's in these pictures. Details may be found on our website, www.rcsri.org.

-Geoffrey G. Rochat, Member, Retro-Computing Society of Rhode Island

4
0
This topic is closed for new posts.