back to article New Intel flash hardness performs faster for less

Intel has a new budget 330-series solid-state drive (SSD) coming on Friday, 13 April, according to Amazon and other online bazaars, and it almost doubles the current 320 SSD's performance. Amazon UK lists the 120GB 2.5-inch Intel 330 SSD for £109.05. A Google search on its part number, SSDSC2CT120A3K5, will find dozens of …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Hmm, I was going to buy one of those new Samsung SSDs this month for a Ivy Bridge build... perhaps these SSDs will be launched alongside the mysterious Intel mobo?

0
0
Alert

Reliability ??

I may be wrong but at this price point surely the target audience is for the home user , probably using it to host the O/S. In which case , as important as the read/write figures are surly it's the RTBF figures we should be comparing.

4
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Reliability ??

Which is why I have several 320s (120GB, 80GB and 2x 40GB), that and their capacitors to preserve data. Been very reliable drives for me and honestly as fast as most low end systems need, the bottleneck seemed to swing back towards the CPU in my laptop, server and to an extent Media PC.

Are the 330 Sandforce based, Marvell or an Intel design??

0
0
Silver badge
Thumb Up

Re: Reliability ??

@Doug 14 - I agree. I've been looking at the idea of getting an SSD for my C drive, but I talked to a local shop who have currently stopped selling them as they've had about a 50% failure rate and they're getting pi$$ed off with having to deal with so many returns and upset customers!

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: Reliability ??

I'd be curious if there was some way to know how much of that 50% was compatibility problems vs. actual failures. I'd also be curious what brands, and how long ago they had this experience.

Should also be mentioned that most SSD failures are bricking - a lot of people get all torqued up about write endurance, but for a properly configured machine (i.e. an OS that knows not to try and defrag, etc) it's a non-issue for even relatively heavy (assuming Anand's usage qualifies as relatively heavy) usage for an easy 3-5 years. Workstations and servers are a different story of course.

SSDs aren't perfect - don't get me wrong - but their benefits are HUGE. FWIW, Intel has the best rep for reliability - even, it seems, with their Sandforce-based SSDs - with Samsung and Crucial (Micron) having pretty decent reps for reliability too. They seem to be getting more reliable with each new generation, and compatibility is less and less of an issue over time as well.

Just don't get distracted with IOPS and MBps - the fastest drives are often the most temperamental. They call it bleeding edge for a reason : )

0
0
Bronze badge

Re: Reliability ??

You think anyone would continue to sell product with that kind of failure and return rate? Not hard to find SSD vendors.

I have a two year old 160GB X25M which has racked up 13,500 power on hours, and 1070 power cycles. It has 5.3TB of writes, 1 reallocated sector, 99% reserved space and 98% wear left.

It might die tomorrow like any other drive but it hasn't been a scrap of bother in 2 years.

1
0
Anonymous Coward

meaningless metrics 101

What is an IOPS?

This is a meaningless metric, because, amongst other things the IO size is not indicated. Trust me, when you are doing 1MB IOs, the performance of these things is not what the IOPS might indicate.

Dweeb

0
5
FAIL

Re: meaningless metrics 101

Fair enough, I guess: if you don't know what something means, then it's meaningless to you.

But please stop and think that, just maybe, it means something to others.

2
0
Boffin

Re: meaningless metrics 101

The importance of the IOPS is to know (or have a rough idea, at least) how the SSD would perform doing small writes/reads.

Think about it for a moment.

Case 1: I am writing a movie to the SSD; The IOPS count is low, and the bandwidth used is high. Not so important the IOPS here.

Case 2: A file server. Not a media server, a file server. It has to read/write thousands of small files (word, excel, text documents, and so on). Now the IOPS are relevant - because each file would count. In a situation like this one could, easily, get choked with the number os IOPS, and never scratch the speed of read/write.

What? This is a consumer product, not a server one ? Fair enough. Imagine you are a developer, and your project (along with dependencies and libraries) have thousands of small files. Or, even better, think about your boot! Yes, all OS (Linux, Windows, BSD, whatever) read a huge amount of small files - and here the IOPS are important.

So, yes. The IOPS are a very real and important metric. Maybe not to everyone, but to call it bogus...

3
0
Gold badge
Coat

Re: meaningless metrics 101

"What is an IOPS?"

Sorry; you typed that question into the wrong tab. This is still The Register. Yes, you did open Ask Jeeves; it's the tab over there →

2
0
Anonymous Coward

vs 520?

So why these instead of the 520s? I'm not getting their target markets for each series...

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums