Feeds

back to article Hobbit movie locations using 6km of data cabling

Crews working on the two Hobbit movies are doing so with the help of six kilometres of data cabling. That's one the revelations in the latest official production vlog, featuring IT Systems Manager Nick Trugly who says one of the challenges working on location poses is that “We are a long way from most of the infrastructure we …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

6KM

That's umm, only 20ish rolls of CAT5? Not exactly a revelation, I've used more than that in a weekend.

3
0
Silver badge

Re: 6KM

Am I the only one who yawned reading this?

1
0
Silver badge

Re: 6KM

No offence to the writer of the article, in fact some of the more long winded comments are worse.

0
0
Vic
Silver badge

Re: 6KM

> Not exactly a revelation, I've used more than that in a weekend.

I was thinking exactly the same.

I was more interested in the fact that Andy Sirkis is directing the Second Unit.

Vic.

2
0
Bronze badge
Thumb Up

Seconded

A shame he can't swap seats with Peter "MORE IGOR MORE!" Jackson.

0
0

Re: 6KM

Andy Sirkis or Andy Serkis? Different people?

0
0
WTF?

They have 20 boxes of cat5 (305m per box) and 3 sats across two locations

Not exactly ground breaking?

0
0
Nya
Coat

Think the title should be...

Hobbit Movie location using pint sized amount of data cabling

0
0
Silver badge
Joke

Meanwhile on the set of Star Wars 7

Staff are using the force 2.0...

0
0
Silver badge

To those who say 'meh...

I find this article more interesting when contrasted with the filming of the LOTR over ten years ago.

WETA were creating post-production footage in NZ, and sending it over broadband to London. However, the last mile from the studio offices to Peter Jackson's house and editing suite (Door decorated with picture of PJ as Bad Taste's 'Derek' wielding a chainsaw) required that day's footage to be carried on an iPod.

1
0

Data cap?

Sending up 4K stereoscopic 48f/s footage via satellite for editing; sounds cheap. Over their data cap yet? ;)

0
0
Happy

Re: Data cap?

Raw format would be 15.288 gigabits per second at 12bits RGB or XYZ

Stereoscopic frames can transmit left frame/delta right for some major compression to start, let's call it a 25% savings. So 11.466 gigabits

Then pure I-Frame is something that only morons use because they actually think I-frame is better than IPPP for example. So, let's assume purely forward prediction That should give us another 25% savings at least. In long GOPs it can even reach 50%. So let's presume long GOPs over TCP since real-time/UDP is a waste. So 5.733 gigabits per second.

Then let's assume that damn near perfect is good enough and the the raw assets can be transmitted later. Therefore we do wavelet transformation and block based prediction with a low loss DCT for predictive frames. Then we use an adaptive arithmetic coding. Overall retaining 50db PSNR. That should provide an average of 20:1 compression of what's left. That's 288Mbits per second.

Assuming it's not needed real time and TCP or error checking and reporting occurs one a per link basis and windowing is applied, then we could assume 5 minutes of video can transmit at 30Mbits per second in an hour. If it has to be seen RIGHT NOW, then employing high loss, 17-20db SNR H.264 with bidirectional prediction can easily transmit downscaled stereo 1080p at 30Mbits/sec in real time.

So, I wouldn't be overly impressed by the tech. Remember that they can transmit clips at a lower quality for the purpose of editing and previewing and then transmit the full clip from a high speed link elsewhere... or simply send hard drives or SSDs by FedEx which might be cheaper.

0
0
Paris Hilton

OFF TOPIC

just had to ask somewhere.....

what the hells happened to the comment / forum system?

I was about to use the AC button for the first time cos this post is gonna make me look like an idiot - but i cant find it. I guess if its gone that'd be good thing but I'm sure most reg readers would disagree

when looking at my previous comments i can no longer find a link back to the point in the comments list where my comment was positioned. has it gone? it took me while to fiond it first time round

The threading display seems to have got worse too - you cant tell whose replying to what now!

lil help someone?

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Re: OFF TOPIC

It's in the top left corner of the comments box, marked post anonymously. You might want to use those things either side of the top of your nose.

1
2
Coat

Re: OFF TOPIC

What? His eyebrows?

0
0
Happy

Lets get to the important bits of the article

Screw the amount of cabling, 200 to 300 coffees a morning. Mmmm. Now that's a good morning. Where's the I'm very very very manic happy grin icon.

0
0

Bah

We had over 50km in the last data center i was in and it was only a third full

0
0

This post has been deleted by its author

The relatively small amount of CAT5 is easily explained:

Most of the data is being shifted optically using Palantiri.

The Cat5 is just back-up.

1
0
Happy

How much bandwidth on a Palantiri network?

0
0
Silver badge
Joke

Re: How much bandwidth on a Palantiri network?

Loads - more even than fibre, in fact - but unfortunately all the Palantiri connections seem to have been routed solely to the cloud server in Mordor. Attempts to retrieve data stored on this cloud seem to result only in a video of a giant flaming eye and a cryptic "I see you" message.

So as a means of communicating data directly between other Palantir locations the cat5 is actually an interim solution until the IT bods over there can get the Palantiri reconnected correctly.

1
0
Silver badge
Go

I smell a BOFH

Sys Admin admits he is "not sure where it has all gone, but we keep ordering more"

Sounds awfully like a BOFH story where he's cabled it with 20m of thinwire and invoiced for 20 drums of Cat6 plus a few weekends of overtime to cable it out-of-hours... Nicely done!

0
0

Re: I smell a BOFH

Well, our dear Simon is from Hobbitsville, so I expect he's trained a fair few apprentices by now...

0
0

broadcasting

I work for a broadcaster and we use quite a bit more than 6km for a transmission system. However to have 6km of cat-6 out in the field is quite a lot, the data centres that they are sending back to will have a hell of a lot more.

A standard outside broadcast truck will have about 1Km of cat-5e, about 3Km of IMG-1000 for video and a few hundred meters of CT-100 for the RF stuff oh and 1Km of IMG-360 for black and burst reference to the broadcast kit (cameras, vtr's, etc...).

It is true that this is all very boring unless you work in the industry, then it's only slightly less boring.

I wonder how they are powering it all out there, must have a massive genny

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.