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back to article Nepal asks for a leg-up to nail Everest's height

The Nepalese government has been forced to ask for international assistance in nailing the exact height of Everest, less than a year after it declared it was more than capable of settling the matter once and for all. Nepal – in common with much of the world – uses a 1955 Indian survey figure of 8,848m (29,029ft) as the height of …

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Who the hell cares?

29,000 feet above sea level, plus or minus a couple hundredths of a percent.

I suspect the fine folks in Hawai'i would giggle ;-)

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Coat

Re: Who the hell cares?

I'm one of the "don't cares" myself.

Those who care about this are the ones who are in a pissing contest about Everest's height, and probably think that the size of their mountain is a proxy measure for their dicks

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Re: Who the hell cares?

That's terribly negative of you.

Sorry, but I just don't like your altitude......

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Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

Icy what you did there.

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Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

I agree, it's summit he should have thought carefully about before posting.

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DJO
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Re: Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

I would mount a response but I'm feeling a bit peaky.

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Re: Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

Most people just take Everest for granite........

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

Theres snow chance of this thread getting back on topic now.

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(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Who the hell cares?

Indeed, and to summit up, I sense a certain Tenzing among the comments moderators...

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Are we sure that number is constant? Snow can pile in a bit higher or a bit lower, and even the rock could rise or fall a little bit over decades.

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Thumb Up

Right on money, sir

Himalaya´s height is indeed pretty unstable, but I do not mean the snow. Himalaya has risen, when the then-separatedly moving India crashed head on with pra-Asia. The movement continues to this day and so, the Himalaya is still growing. We have multiple evidence of this, some of it quite interesting. For example, the camel caravans used to walk through some of the himalayans passes. Today the same passes are, ehm, passable only with ice-picks and crampons. Forgive my English.

So, to me it is not much about who was right during last measuring, but rather how much the Everest grew since Mallory/Irvine´s days...

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Meh

Maybe

This could become an olympic sport: synchronised mountain measuring. I can't think of any other reason for countries to compete for the pointless goal of having measured Everest most accurately.

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Stop

Surely they can ask those nice Merkins...

To measure it with one of their super accurate RADAR satellite thingies they have whizzing around.

Aren't they supposed to be able to measure the height of things quite well?

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Holmes

Re: Surely they can ask those nice Merkins...

We already did. They just want to do it themselves.

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Anonymous Coward

Now we have the technology and the resources...

...to ask someone to measure our mountain.

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M7S
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Following his TomTom gig, a celebrity opportunity

If its all about clocks and timing, in the same way as I understand GPS is, then just get Brian Blessed to nip back up there, and to shout a bit.

Put a couple of microphones on nearby peaks (of known height) and you should be able to work out from the timing interval/triangulation the exact distance and thus the height of Everest.

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Re: Following his TomTom gig, a celebrity opportunity

This being Brian, I doubt you'd even need them to be nearby peaks!

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Boffin

GPS

Simply drop a GPS receiver and transmitter on the summit and leave it to run for a few days. This will be very accurate.

They should also push a rod down through the snow to measure the snow height.

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Re: GPS

Someone tried this a few years ago on K2 and came up with a result that made it higher than Everest. Then someone else had another go and found that K2 was, as had been long suspected, more than 800 feet lower than Chomolungma.

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Alert

Re: GPS

No. GPS is pretty awful at doing altitude. Check out the fact that there is a separate vertical accuracy figure in GPS data.

You must be trolling. Do you not think that there are quite a few people who have experimented with this in the 18 years GPS has been operational? Including millions who have such a function embedded in their mobile phones?

This is also the reason that aircraft rely on other mechanisms for collision avoidance.

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Boffin

Ice is a mineral

Ice is a naturally occuring crystalline inorganic solid, and therefore a mineral. It surely follows that the snow on the summit of a mountain counts as part of the mountain.

If the objection is that this means the height of the mountain varies from time to time, that's not a problem restricted to ice. Mountains are mostly gently sinking as their roots melt into the underlying magma, unless the tectonic processes that created them are still ongoing. (Everest is sinking. The Andes are mostly rising). Earthquake activity can create sudden changes. Frost-shattering can cause large chunks of a rocky peak to break off.

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Trollface

Shirley Not!

And here was me thinking ice was a vegetable.... I've been adding at least one serve of veges a day to my diet sheet, based on my Tom Collins consumption....

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Holmes

Re: GPS

Pilots' eyes, for example.

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Let's have a sweep!

I'm putting my money on 8,851m.

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