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back to article CRACK made by quakes FOUND ON MOON

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has snapped shots showing that the Moon's crust has been stretched and pulled fairly recently to form tiny valleys on its surfaces. Recent valleys on the Moon's surface Recent valleys on the Moon's surface. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University/Smithsonian Institution The …

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Mushroom

Cheesus Chrust!

The moon lives!

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Paris Hilton

Cellulitis?

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Happy

Clangers!

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Happy

Hot Soup!

Dragons!

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Terminator

unicron transforming veeerrrryyyy sslloooooowwlllyyyy

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Paris Hilton

re: Cellulitis?

Looks more like stretch marks...

Paris, because she has none...

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Alien

Aliens!!

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Coat

Scientists inspect

Moon Crevice

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Cool!

or actually, not that cool (the moon, that is, not the science).

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Very cool...

...or rather, very hot!

So, I was hanging on the edge of my seat... What's the scoop? Does the moon still have a hot core? Is there anyway to find out (from earth)? Probably not unless one observed some sort of Luna volcano??

Of course, if there's a heat source, then it could be harnessed when we (eventually) come to colonise the moon...

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Re: Very cool...

'Does the moon still have a hot core? Is there anyway to find out (from earth)? Probably not unless one observed some sort of Luna volcano??'

The exact state of the Moon's core is uncertain. Apollo left a series of ALSEPs packages on the surface to record heat flow from the interior and register impacts which could have revealed the structure of the interior. In their period of operation we found out the heat flow is very low, but nothing big enough to send a good shock through the core hit the Moon before the instruments were turned off. Having said that, some top notch seismic boffinry has been done on the Moon.

The best estimate is that the lunar core is tiny - no more than 350km across. It's probably nickel-iron alloy with sulfur and silicon like the Earth's core. It is suggested there is a solid or mostly solid inner core about half the diameter of the whole core. The outer core is probably liquid but not convecting violently like the Earth's (hence no appreciable lunar magnetic field), but this is somewhat disputed.

Over that is the mantle which is divided into two, a lower zone about 500km in diameter which appears to be either partially molten or highly plastic and might contain sizeable pockets of magma. The outer mantle is relatively cold, solid and appears not to contain any sizeable amounts of magma.

There has been some mathematical and laboratory modelling of the lunar interior by VU University Amsterdam which used the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility to examine the behaviour of postulated lunar magma under very high temperatures and pressures. Their discovery is that the titanium-rich magmas responsible for forming the rocks returned by Apollo and Luna are unlikely to be able to rise through the lunar mantle because they are denser than the warm mantle. However, if the mantle continues to cool and become denser, we could see a resumption of vulcanism on the Moon.

HTH.

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Facepalm

geothermal energy

Cue, we don't want none o that stinking hippy tech... give us nukes!

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Re: geothermal energy

Well, yeah - give us nukes!

You see, you hippies will be the first to complain if someone would start drilling holes in your backyard (and there will need to be *lots* of holes to get any meaningful geothermal energy unless you are living on a volcano).

You'll be complaining about it causing quakes, polluting ground water, killing earthworms and hurting Gaia and then in 10 - 20 years the wells' heat will be depleted and they will all have to be drilled again in different places...

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Mushroom

@Ben

Geothermal energy _is_ nuclear power sourced, coming mainly from K40 decaying to Ar40.

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Boffin

Re: geothermal energy

Lunothermal energy, Shirley?

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Re: Re: geothermal energy

Selenothermal?

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So, it's true

The recent rumours of Gabe Newell's density causing relativistic time distortions at Valve must be true - he even gave stretch marks to the Moon. Oh, wait a second, he is Gaben, not Graben. My bad.

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Childcatcher

Winners don't do drugs....

Seems it didn't take long for drugs to find their way to the moon. Do we know who these Quakes are that are making that crack? Let's send TJ Hooker to deal with it.

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Re: Winners don't do drugs....

If he is going to the moon, make it TJ Laser!

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Black Helicopters

I blame CERN

The cracks were probably caused by those irresponsible boffins in Geneva meddling with things that were better left alone. And, having already pushed the dial all the way to 11, they seem content to go off the scale. We're all doomed!

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Alien

Re: I blame CERN

Nope - Lunar Warming, caused by man made activity, like the NASA hardware emitting... CO2, yeah that's right CO2

Alien icon because that's us over there

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Coat

Eddies...

.. in the space-time continuum.

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Sir

Is he?

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And

..this is his sofa, is it?

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Boffin

Don't most satellites have hot cores ?

because of the expansion/compression as they get pulled between their host planet, and the sun ?

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Headmaster

Re: Don't most satellites have hot cores ?

From memory, it's because of the difference in gravity between the nearside and farside of said satellite, rather than the pull between the host and the sun.

Thats the case with Jupiter and some of its moons at least, but the gravity is far stronger on Jupiter. I don't think the Earth is massive enough to have that sort of effect. Then again, what do I know.

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Stop

Re: Re: Don't most satellites have hot cores ?

@SR.

No, that's not why Io has volcanoes. The tidal forces on Io are caused by the gravitational effects of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto pulling its surface up and down by about 100 metres. It's not because of the difference in gravity from near and far sides to Jupiter. There's nothing like that in the Earth-Moon-Sun system, and so the inside of our moon isn't very active.

http://www.planetaryexploration.net/jupiter/io/tidal_heating.html

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Unhappy

Look at all the craters!

Has anyone determined the probability of a building on the moon, of a particular size, being hit by a meteor within a given time frame? I know that most of the craters will be very old, but a tiny high speed particle will not be burned up before impact on the moon, so it seems risky to me.

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I personally suspect that those cracks are caused by tidal forces from the Earth's gravity acting on different densities of material on the moon. Given what we know about how the moon formed, it doesn't have enough dense radioactive material to have a hot core after 4 billion years, nor does the Earth apply sufficient tidal energy to directly cause volcanism (think Io). I'm going to expect this to be debunked pretty soon.

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More likely they're down to the interior of the Moon contracting as it has cooled.

The range on the ages of these features is pretty wide; they're anywhere from 1.2 Gya to 50 Mya years ago (most probably towards the younger end of the scale). Lunar geologists have an especially broad definition of 'recent' - even compared to terrestrial geologists.

That there was much going on on the Moon after 1 Gya is interesting enough; the youngest feature with a firm(ish) date is the Compton–Belkovich thorium anomaly, a patch of highly evolved silicic rock on the lunar far side which has been estimated at 800 Mya - 1 Gya.

It'd be interesting to see if any of the glowing Transient Lunar Phenomena which are occasionally reported by astronomers can be tied to these faults. One of the explanations for TLPs is that gas might still be coming out of the interior of the Moon.

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Coat

Tidal locked

I am pretty sure that the tidal forces acting on a tidal locked object do not do any work on the object. You can of course argue that the tidal forces from the sun may have caused it, but I somehow doubt that they are big enough.

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Re: Look at all the craters

And that is why you would want to build your facility as deep underground as is feasible. Not only does it help protect against the inevitable small impacts, it also gives almost 100% protection from those nasty cosmic rays and other sources of radiation out there in space. Living long term on the surface of the moon seems like an excessively risky proposal.

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Nah

Those are the runways where the WW2 bombers landed.

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Megaphone

I don't care...

... about cracks in the moon, but as I'm scanning down the page of headlines this one stood out. Why? Because of the inappropriate shouty-shouty BLOODY CAPITALS IN THE HEADLINE!!! STOP BLOODY SHOUTING, IT'S NOT BIG AND IT'S NOT CLEVER.

And now I return you to your regularly scheduled commentards

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(Written by Reg staff) Silver badge

Re: I don't care...

Anything FOUND ON MOON is worth shouting about.

C.

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Trollface

Re: I don't care...

... but it did get your attention, didn't it?

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scientists?

Some people just can't recognise water erosion when they see it!

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Never mind the cracks

who painted that massive 200m on the moon!? Aliens!

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Flame

Drill baby, drill...

Let's get up there and get a core sample. We'll just jump in one of our Space Shuttles and ... wait ... I forgot - President O'screwu ended the Space Program. Now we have to fork over 50 million US a pop to hitchhike with the Soviets ? We screwed ourselved by voting for the first FAILED black president, Obama, so now we can't get a moon core sample without a Soviet chaperone. There is always a price for voting stupidly, and this is only a tiny fraction of the price we paid, and continue to pay. Thank God November elections are almost here. Obama, you're FIRED !!! (That will be soooo sweet)

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Re: Drill baby, drill...

You, off course do realize that even if you had the Space Shuttle you wouldn't be able to get to the moon. It never was capable of leaving earth's orbit. So, in essence it was not him that screwed you out of it, but don't let that impeach you in your bloated non-factual rant frivolously including something as unimportant as the skin colour...

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Holmes

Re: Drill baby, drill...

Empire state building: 0.381km.

Space shuttle orbit altitude: 300 km average, sometimes 600 km.

Lunar orbit: 362,600km to 405,400km.

Thinking that the Space Transport System (AKA shuttles) would get us to the moon makes as much sense as trying to get to the International Space Station by going to New York City and getting on an elevator.

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WTF?

Re: Drill baby, drill...

Interesting change of subject there (not).

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Re: Re: Drill baby, drill...

Low Earth orbit, at that.

And please note, Mr. Grump, that King Shrub didn't do anything to protect the US space program. Go cast your ignorant racist aspersions elsewhere, prat.

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Alien

@Grubby

Aliens? And why are aliens using the same units of measurements as we do? It lends credence to the fact that Earth was colonized by aliens. And that they are still running things behind the scenes.

As if the machinations going on in Brussels wasn't enough to convince you that some strange, unearthly force was behind all the recent political activity.

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Alert

??

So how, exactly, can they determine that this happened *only* 50 million years ago?

We don't have anything on the ground there so samples are out. This leaves only light waves... Is the ground a different shade of grey? Did that particular grey only come into vogue 50m years back?

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Boffin

Re: ??

I'm going to suggest crater rates. You will be able to work out the age of a surface if craters are superimposed on any feature, the assumption is that different epochs have different (reducing) impacts just due to less stuff flying around the inner solar system over time. So if the number of craters since the event can be counted, its age can be derived. From my armchair though I find the photo difficult to see if any craters superimpose or are crossed by the faults.

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Re: Re: ??

But we are talking about a stretching or pulling apart of the areas...

There are 3 situations:

1. ground stretches, later a meteor impacts.

2. meteor impacts, later ground stretches.

3. ground stretches as a meteor impacts.

#3 is unlikely; unless the crater caused the ground to shift.

Which leaves 1 and 2.

If a meteor impacts prior to stretching then the best you can do is date the impact and state that the crater formed sometime before that..

If a meteor impacts after the stretching then the best you can do is say that the stretching occurred sometime before the stretching was photographed up to the date the crater is dated...

Dating events like this is such crap.

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Black Helicopters

Two possibilities for what those cracks are.....

1. The Decepticons had some gutter work done!

2. The plaster set unevenly on the Area 51 soundstage mockup of the Moon's surface!!

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Go

However, if the cracks really are from pulling and stretching of the surface

And whereas they look kind of like aquatic features.....

And whereas surface features on the moon have been named for everyone from Tycho Brahe to Marilyn Lovell.....

I hearby move that these cracks be christened as the "Joan Rivers"!!

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