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back to article Apple won't rule out all singing, all dancing iBooks on Kindle

Apple has come under fire for keeping all products of its new interactive book-making tool within its walled garden. According to a tough End User License Agreement, any iBooks created by the iBooks Author software can only be sold through the iBookstore so Apple can help itself to a 30 per cent cut. But an unusually chatty …

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Anonymous Coward

Am I missing something?

Why would any writer want such a lock down?

Just create the book normally and convert to the correct format for the store. That way you own the rights and can publish how you like.

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Headmaster

EULA

As far as i am aware, the 30% only applies to the .ibooks format. So if you were to save it out as a PDF you would be free to sell it as you pleased.

No gallery widgets etc, but no walled garden either.

No doubt someone will come up with a program that converts the .ibooks format into something for other platforms that preserves the rich features, and no doubt apple will change their eula when that happens.

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Not quite

My understanding, as was also highligthed yesterday (I think) is that the author can only distribute it in different formats if they provide the book for free. If they sell it through Apple then they can't produce alternate formats for use else where.

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I think all the haters are missing something: don't like the business model? Don't use it. Find another publisher for your worthy tome.

I whilst we are asking these sorts of questions, why should I as a consumer want to pay for what people produce? Especially with a digital download, I'm not even buying the paper!!! What are the authors thinking, actually wanting to charge for something they've spent time over?!?! Just doesn't make any sense! it's teh insaneness!!!!

/sarc

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Silver badge

Something's just occurred to me...

If I recall correctly, Apple insist that anything sold through their app store can only be sold through other channels at the same price - doesn't that sound suspiciously close to price fixing?

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Anonymous Coward

Possibly

But that's mostly how publishing has happened for years.

You can accept apples terms, Amazons equally dodgy terms or any other publishers dodgy terms.

There's already a European investigation in a group of publishers, apple included

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Anonymous Coward

And here's a link

to the story about the investigation

http://www.out-law.com/en/articles/2011/december/apple-and-publishers-subject-of-competition-investigation-into-sale-of-e-books/

There's a name for a book publishing agreement that limits price as well, but I'm damned if I can remember it. May be an enlightened El Reg reader can help out

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The Nett Book Agreement...

...is what it used to be called - and that may be what you're thinking about.

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Net Book Agreement

This kind of went the other way as it provided a legal means for publishers to blacklist sellers who discounted books below cover price.....

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This post has been deleted by its author

Thumb Up

Cheers

Thanks Random and Piers, that's exactly what I was thinking off

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Gold badge

Door open?

You think that Apple would let you reverse-engineer the ibook file format and display ibooks on devices that you haven't paid Apple for? <TROLL> It would only have to look a bit like an ibook reader and you'd be asked to stop :) </TROLL>

Anyway, the EULA you are talking about is the one that binds the creator of the ibook file; I don't think that it binds anyone else, so interestingly if you downloaded a free ibook file I don't see why you should be bound to the EULA of the software used to create it? (However, I don't know because I haven't read the EULA)

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LPF

Well in apples defence..

They have to pay to support and maintain the infrastructure and unlike so many others they dont relie for their RnD on copying other people.

Anyway I thought the Ipad was a fad ??

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Anonymous Coward

???

What infrastructure? The iStore? Fine, the 30% they take selling books through that pays for it. But not allowing them to be sold elsewhere makes no sense as a defence, because people selling elsewhere wouldn't use that infrastructure ...

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Silver badge

But AC

You've still used that iBook creation tool you never paid for.

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AIUI, the iBook format is little more than an extension of HTML. The R&D for it is negligible.

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Happy

Missed the main story

Hang on... surely the big news here is that an Apple spokesman spoke to El Reg?!

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This post has been deleted by its author

WTF?

Yeah, I saw that too.

But since The Reg has started waxing lyrical about i{phone,pad,pod,tv,car,fridge,whatever} they must have kissed and made up.

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Stop

publishers aren't the problem

in this case the choice of publishers isn't a problem. The problems lie in the restrictions applied to the use of the software - you want to use it for free? then you can only sell the end product via apple. Anybody in their right mind and even remotely commercially minded would have to be seriously retarded (and exceptionally cheap) to insist on using the free version.

Moral of the story - don't be such a cheap tight-wad, pay at least $20 for Pages for Mac and you will be free to do what you want with your book and have it published by whomever you desire

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Anonymous Coward

> don't be such a cheap tight-wad, pay at least $20 for Pages for Mac

Or download LyX for free and do it properly....

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Am I missing something?

I really dont understand the fuss... If you use Apples free software to create an interactive proprietary format book, then you can choose to either export it as a PDF and sell it freely as you can with any other commercial software, or keep it in the Apple-owned ibooks format and sell it through Apple's commercial outlet for a 30% fee, as with all of their store content.

Its less than any publisher would take and they're selling the book across thousands of iDevices for you. If you dont want to pay 30%, just export it as a PDF or keep it in iBooks format and make it free.

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Anonymous Coward

The fuss is....

..complaining about Apple is a hobby for several regtards.

I for one am very interested in this model and hoping it is extended to other countries. As an author of a dead-tree book I get 15% of cover price and am not allowed to redistribute it under any other format.

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JDX
Gold badge

re:Am I missing something?

>>Just create the book normally and convert to the correct format for the store.

It's a fancy interactive format, so that might be tricky.... I was wondering how much of the functionality is lost by exporting to PDF actually.

Also, Apple could easily say you're only allowed to create iBook books in iBooks if they wanted to.

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"It's a fancy interactive format, so that might be tricky.... I was wondering how much of the functionality is lost by exporting to PDF actually."

Most of it. The iBooks format is EPUB3 with some HTML5 trickery. PDF just can't handle the embedded files to provide the UI Apple is pushing for. If it's a plain text & pics affair, then you're fine, but only the .ibook format provides the video, slideshows and 3d interactive stuff possible with the Author software. I tried.

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Gold badge

Kindle Fire is not Kindle

The picture accompanying the "Top Stories" billing is of a Kindle reader and the story says nothing about iBooks on *that*.

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This post has been deleted by its author

Anonymous Coward

Isn't ePub3 supposed to be an open standard? Enter Apple left with extra proprietary bits...

Isn't HTML supposed be an open standard? Enter MS Explorer left...

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Anonymous Coward

Enter stage left Adobe and Quark with their own extra proprietary bits and licences

and they're all members of the ipdf.

http://idpf.org/membership/members

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Anonymous Coward

> Isn't ePub3 supposed to be an open standard? Enter Apple left with extra proprietary bits...

As far as I know the 'extra proprietary bits' re-implement functionality which is already part of the epub 3 standard.

If that is true then it doesn't make Apple look too good...

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Anonymous Coward

But it isn't true. iBooks uses CSS extensions to get a level of layout and format control that is simply not possible using the standard.

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The 30% issue...

You can write and you can publish.

Apple only seems to reserve their rights to the ibooks format as far as I can tell.

Everyone is barking on about Apple taking 30%. Publishing houses take far more than this. A colleague of mine gets 50p for every £15.00 book sold! That’s a 96% cut for the publisher! Knowing the colleague the book is a pretty niche market one anyway.

Sure you can publish for free as pdf etc. If you just want to get your work out there then this is fine. If you want to get some recompense for the time and effort then you need to sell.

A lot of people publish their own 'e-books' and charge for them (on their sites), but will you be exposed to the same market on your own site as iBook store or Amazon? I browse Amazon and iBook store, but rarely go looking for books elsewhere.

Seems to me fairly reasonable.

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Anonymous Coward

Maybe you should ask your 'friend' what his publisher does and compare that with Apple. Instead of the 'cut', you could focus on editing, promotion...

For such little involvement, Apple's asking for quite a bit.

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the crux

"A lot of people publish their own 'e-books' and charge for them (on their sites)," but if you use ipublisher and want to make use of the features of iBooks, that is precisely what you are forbidden from doing. Instead you could only link to your book on itunes.

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Bronze badge
Stop

iBaptist ?

singing and dancing ?

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