back to article Fragged, fragged and thrice fragged! 20 years of id Software’s Doom

id Software’s Doom – the definitive first-person shooter – is 20 years old today. It was uploaded to the University of Washington’s servers at midnight, 10 December 1993 in the form of a .zip file containing the game and the first set of levels. It didn’t take long to generate a massive buzz – and because id was offering extra …

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Joke

Doom vs Wolfenstein 3D

An apt comparison. If you didn't like Doom, then you do like Hitler.

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Pint

Ah the good old days, but

Dont forget the era of mods!

the aliens mod for Doom II was amazing!

check those corners.....CHECK THOSE CORNERS..

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Happy

I remember someone on cix saying that he'd allowed his 7 year old to play Alien Doom, on one condition.

Playing rights were to be instantly and permanently rescinded if he ever said "Die motherfucker" in front of his mum.

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Alien

Ah the Aliens mod...

Played with the lights low and the sound up, that was a seriously scary version.

Not helped by the fact that I had a mouse problem at the time which meant every so often my gun would go off in automatic mode, making me jump and wasting all the far-too-scarce ammo that I had.

Happy days...

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I had a humorous sound FX mod. The brown fire spitting monsters used to announce their presence with 'Yoo hoo' and 'Coo-ee'.

Classic fun.

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Brilliant

This ranks as one of my favourite comments ever.

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the best thing about Aliens TC was the genius decision to put no monsters into the first level. awesome idea.

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Re: Ah the good old days, but

The mods I remember most was the mod that turned Satanic creatures into Barney the dinosaur and friends and the sound mod that include dialogue from the classic movie Army of Darkness. This is my boomstick.

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+1 Scary

I remember sitting one night in a room lit only by a monitor playing Doom. I was cracking through episode 2 and had to stop and laugh at myself halfway through my first encounter with Rockethands, because the dark and the hunt had my heart going twenty to the dozen, thumpthumpthump.

Good game.

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What Lucy said

Only game that made me look behind me when playing late at night.

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The id legacy

Hmmm, I dunno if I can really see Doom and it's ilk with the same hint of nostalgia.

Wolfenstein 3D, for me at least was an exercise in frustration - no maps, no easy way of finding hidden sections of wall aside from just spamming the use button everywhere and the shared ammo system for every weapon meant that once you had the next one up (e.g. machine gun to chain gun) you never used it's predecessor again.

Doom 1 was good for the reasons stated in the article, although sadly I never got to play deathmatch. Doom 2 was a mixed bag for me. It seems like the level designers had a lot more fun this time around, with lots of evil tricks (e.g. a plasma rifle beneath a huge slab of falling rock should you attempt to pick it up, turning the demons against each other). That said, there were some glaring issues with it - certain levels were nothing more than meat grinders without much strategy or design involved. Only one new weapon was added and some of the new creatures were just downright annoying (the resurrecting, flame spamming Archvile springs to mind).

It wasn't until Doom 3 that I genuinely felt The Fear, playing with the sound up and lights down. It seemed like more thought had gone into creating a realistic space environment, harking back to Doom 1 and then a lot more thought had gone into making afforementioned environment as laundry soiling as possible. The business with the endless keypads and numbers was a bit much.

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Doom3

Doom 3 ... the atmosphere was excellent and genuinely scary - my other half came to see if I was coming to bed late one night during a Doom 3 session, in the dark, with headphones on... to get my attention she tapped me on the shoulder - I swear I screamed like a girl and nearly had a heart attack O_o The graphics were great, sound effects excellent, solid level design and, though rather clichéd, I enjoyed the story.

The _only_ downside with Doom 3 was that it became dated very quickly; not the old atmosphere tricks like very low, flickering lighting and quiet spooky noises suddenly punctuated by bursts of RAAAAH as some demonic monstrosity pounced on you as you opened a door, those are fine ... but a couple of months after Doom 3 was released Valve released Half-Life 2.

Suddenly, playing Doom 3 and walking into chairs without being able to just pick them up and throw them away, just felt very, very old.

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Yay, Nintendo DS version of Doom

It is actually pretty good.

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And the Jaguar's version too.

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Anonymous Coward

use on a network....

Bloody hell, I remember linking my 486 to my mates 386 with a home made serial cable, oh and humping your full sized tower and back breaker CRT halfway across town.

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Zot
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386?

Of course they had to play it on a postage stamp size window, just to get an acceptable frame rate.

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Re: use on a network....

Thomas? Is that you? The 386 was a bit crap though, had to have the screen res so low it was just a little box in the centre of the screen.

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Re: use on a network....

I remember playing Doom on Sun workstations -- already networked, it all just worked together. Great deathmatches.

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Magnifique El reg!

Brilliant! If I am not mistaken it made 41 in PC Gamer's Top 100 Games of all time 2010.

It was the first game I ever played that allowed collaborative on line play, up to 4 players

Man I spent hours playing that and recall how version 1.0 would kill the company network with SPX/IPX packets. 1.1 onwards resolved this issue, but sysadmin was still not happy.

There were also some sick mods with Aliens and Jurassic Park themes and weapon upgrades in modified .WAD files. My fave was upgrading the hand gun with an IMI Desert Eagle. Same punch as the shotgun!

Sneaking around corners, shooting exploding barrels, going up stairs and down via elevators, it changed gaming as I knew it. Imps, beasts, zombies and demons all set on a planet far, far away with a choice of weapons to match including..... a chainsaw!

Followed by Doom2 followed which all had the same look and feel with new environments and challenges

Sadly other great games like Quake and DN3D were released and Doom semeed a little aged, but nothing could beat it for the president it set in the gaming world.

Thank you John Carmack, American McGee and rest of ID Software for the best spent hours I "wasted"[?] playing this epic FPS

Off topic: I recall seeing a dead Doom Marine in a level in Duke Nukem 3D, what nice homage to the groundbreaking FPS.

Two thumbs up!

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Ah yes.

When level design meant more than an attractive single route the player could go down with cutscenes at the end. Managing your ammo, bypassing a health pack when you're at 95% because you'd waste 15% of it and you wanted it available to go back to – all these things make for a better game, regardless of how many bells and whistles the graphics engine distracts you with.

Talking about corridors my favourite level was in a Doom add-on. You teleported in to a long corridor with the out-teleport at the other end. There were loads of really tough daemons facing away from you and a shed-load of explosive barrels lining it.

Eureka moment – leg it down the corridor then turn and shoot a far barrel with the pistol. All the daemons start to turn round. Watch the chain reaction as the barrels blew race down the corridor taking them out – step backwards on to the teleport just before the shock wave reaches you...brilliant.

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Mushroom

Still fragging

Totally agree with your enthusiasm for this classic game. The graphics and movement may be primitive compared with today's technology, but the gameplay is still as good as anything that has appeared since. I still play it regularly and have not tired of it yet - how many gamers will still be playing COD:MW3 twenty years from now?

By the way, there appears to be an Android version available too.

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Just don't mention Doom 3.

Seriously.

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Devil

DOOM ruined my life.... who can I sue

If somebody hadn't shown me DOOM,

I would never have bought a computer,

I would never have gone to University..... and I wouldn't be working in IT

Some games will just never die. How many modern games will still be selling this far past their sell by date. Not many

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Anonymous Coward

Ah, happy memories

Reminds me of happy hours spent in the uni computer labs. They made the mistake of having a shiny new cluster of largely unsupervised 50mhz 486s about a month before this came out. As the only computers on campus that could play this properly they suddenly became a lot more popular. Of course any directory called doom in the root of the c drive didn't last long, we soon learnt to install it in a directory called word or a sub-directory of windows where it would last a little longer before we needed to bring in the stack of floppies again. Ac because my username here is my old uni mainframe account name.

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Brilliant, Brilliant, Brilliant

Doom is the best game ever written - the graphics were amazing for the time, the music superb and the atmosphere electric.

On top of that, the multiplayer was incredible - I'd hate to count the hours of productivity I lost playing deathmatches when I should have been working

In the history of video games, Doom is right up there with Space Invaders and Pong as a milestone in the evolution of the industry

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Anonymous Coward

Yes, awesome music which is now my earworm.

Thanks for that.

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Mushroom

Ah yes, fond memories indeed. Also fun to let of steam with the cheat codes (IDDQD and IDKFA if I remember correctly, even after 20 years or so) and running around just using the chainsaw (or the BFG if the mood took you).

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Don't forget:

IDSPISPOPD !

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Correct

As I type, I have the immortal (in more ways than one) letters IDDQD emblazoned on my water bottle at work. Not a single person yet has ever 'got it'...

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oh, but...

...you're not hardcore unless you know *why* it's DQD.

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MrT
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Delta...

...but Chuck Norris didn't Quit...

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Paris Hilton

Is it bad...

...that I flashed back to my rushing of the stairway shown in the "Alien resurrection" map screenshot?

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Anonymous Coward

Ermm....

I managed to persuade the charity I worked for to stump up for a Netware license so I could play doom deathmatches...in my defence I only arranged them after hours, and I did spend some time doing maintenance whilst my guest killed each other with gusto.

Later I realised I could load all the relevant drivers from a boot floppy, and didn't need the server...ah well, we got a really good deal, and it did make the training computers work far better...

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1st Screnshot

The 1st screenshot, is that a 3D model remake?

The original was all sprites.

Also, regarding availability, it is available on XBox live (or at least, in my drunken state, I managed to get it on the XBox...). Cue much whinging and gnashing of teeth about joypad vs. keyboard.

Played it on my first PC, a 486. After being used to 2D platformers, was a revelation!

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2nd screenshot

The second one is ... if you find the 320x200 spritelyness of the original a little hard to bear on today's massive (by 1993 standards) there's a full 3D-mapped version thats actually quite good, even if it does take a little of the nostalgic magic out

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I once spent a long weekend playing the entire trilogy from beginning to end. It took nearly a week for me to stop feeling nervous when I approached a doorway :)

I'd like to see a modern equivalent. I know there's a lot of first person shooters but what I miss from Doom was the relatively free movement (go anywhere you like) and pretty much infinite ammo. It's obviously not realistic but I loved being able to just let rip and empty the entire magazine of the Gatling gun without having to worry about where the next ammo chain was coming from :)

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there are a few

Serious Sam, and Painkiller were attempts to recreate the old feelings of playing doom. There are probably more out there

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Still holds up

It's still a great game. I think even the graphics aged well to a certain degree. Certainly, you can load the files into one of the new game engines based on the source, and get mouse look, and much higher resolutions. You're still using the original art, and it still looks fine.

A truly efficient, fun, and frantic game.

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Cacodemons? Pah!

The red floating ones were called Tomato Beasts, the brown fireball-flinging ones were called Bungles and the pink ones were called Murrays! At least that's what they were known as by myself and my mates. I really got into Doom and as I had a lot of free time in 94/95 I also learnt how to make levels and some of them were even rather good.

On a nitpicking note, the first screenshot of this article is from Doom 2 - the original Doom didn't have the double-barrelled shotgun.

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Happy

From the game that gave frag a slightly new definition...

Ah Doom!

I recall the earlier versions which used (I think) IPX which brang many a network to its knees, and the later TCP/IP versions which didn't as much.

And the mods (all those .wad files)! Can't remember if it was I or II, but I too played a pretty full-on Aliens mod. Sounds and everything it wasa great! I also created a few little mods myself, the best being the one that was a reconstruction of my flat at university (albeit one with lots of monsters, Nazis and a teleporter instead of stairs).

Happy days!

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always IPX

The official Doom always ran on IPX (unless you count Doom 95, which...you don't). Only later source ports based on the open source release can use TCP/IP.

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Thanks, I'll be humming the Doom music all day now.

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Da-da-da da-da-da da-da-da daaah-daaah!

Of course you have to try to make that noise through a very small plastic funnel to get the full effect of a crap little 2 inch PC speaker of yesteryear.

100W 14 inch woofer on a 5.1 Surround sound kit, hooked up to a games console? Tch! Kid's today, eh?!

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I try and hum it through my nose, which sounds nearly the same to me.

Damn it, I need to re install it and dig out my floppies... oh balls. I don't have a floppy drive any more.

Do they even make them any more?

KHAAAAAAAN!

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re: music and pc speaker

I'm not 100% sure, but my recollection was the internal speaker was sound effects only. If you wanted music I think you needed a soundcard - they weren't common back then but were starting to catch on.

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correct

you, sir, are correct.

Doom had the old classic set of support for Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, and I think Gravis Ultrasound. And General MIDI, if you had a MIDI-capable card, for music.

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Anonymous Coward

floppies....

the best use for a compaq armada m100....

network doom, over 802.11...while drinking in a bar. Me and another guy on opposite sides of the bar

anonymous because the machine was supposed to be for work only....

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Devil

Nostalgia, not what it used to be!

I remember being handed the 1.0 two-floppy disks with a knowing 'you'll like this' from the physics department technician ... it's one of few games that actually gave me nightmares, lol.

There's nothing more tantalizing to a 16 year old girl than finding out you can shoot barrels next to people and reduce them to a set of spare ribs - a trick I repeated whenever possible >:-)

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The world needs more girls with such tastes.

I still play Doom 2, myself. Mowing shit down is a great way to blow off steam after a long day. Modern FPSes make you think more. (which isn't necessarily a bad thing but isn't always what I want)

Modern FPSes often freak me out too much to enjoy it, too. Doom is cartoony enough to be fairly harmless in that respect, at least today. Pretty disturbing when I was twelve though.

Pain Elementals still make me flinch.

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Most ported game ever?

Could be. I've run it on my 4G iPod, and I've seen it running on devices as diverse as digital cameras and internet-enabled fridges.

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