back to article Stanford boffins create skinnier ‘skin’

A group of scientists from Stanford University has created an artificial “skin” that acts as a stretchable, super-thin pressure sensor. The Bao Research Group led by Zhenan Bao has demonstrated the film, which is made from single-wall carbon nanotubes bent to act as springs. The real breakthrough, however, isn’t just creating a …

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Boffin

New Reg Unit?

"twice the pressure exerted by an elephant standing on one foot"

Will this become the official El Reg unit of pressure?

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Silver badge

That will be

Elephants per square foot or esf - great! Only need to work out the conversion factor to mice per square inch or msi...

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I hope this guy and my Cousin can get together and see what they can come up with as his field would be very complimentary.

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Headmaster

Like a meadow of tulips that tell you how pretty you are?

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Anonymous Coward

SILICONE.

This from a site dedicated to an industry based on silicon? Really?

Can't wait for your next piece on overclocking breast implants...

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HMB

Very Cool... But..

It's fantastic that this is developed, but not as impressive as the skin I have which can easily make out a 0.5g micro sd card on it and detect things even smaller and lighter.

Firm pinch not required.

I think I'll pass on the elephant though.

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FAIL

This product is a first generation prototype

Yours is about a.... 10,000,000 th generation product.

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Bronze badge

Units

You beat me to it Christoph ... :-)

We already have the foot pound, pounds feet, pounds per square foot and such like so a logical extention would be the elephant foot ... You obviuosly can't have square elephant feet as that would make them look silly ...

So now it's just relative sizes ... how many gentle fingerings do you get to the elephant foot? And is that an Asian elephant or an African eleph...

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Stop

Silicon[e]

I haven't watched the video or searched elsewhere, but ... it sounds entirely plausible that these sensors would be deployed on a sheet of siliconE, which is a stretchy material which can be made into thin sheets. Silicon, the element, isn't so stretchy.

I see the article itself has been patched to read "silicon". Which is probably wrong.

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