Feeds

back to article Mystery over bogus Facebook login data dump

The publication on Pastebin of the supposed login details of more than 10,000 Facebook users fails to pose any security risks, at least on the social network, because the data is bogus, according to Facebook. Newly established Nepalese hacking crew Team Swastika caused a stir when they dumped the supposed Facebook login data on …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Silver badge
Headmaster

> Third Reich appropriated the symbol

That would be the NSDAP.

In a similar vein, hammers and sickles are manual tools of great value until appropriated by another bunch of collectivists.

4
0
Silver badge
Coat

Would it be tasteless to add something about a stylised bitten apple to that list?

I suppose it would. Oh well...

3
0
Anonymous Coward

Stars and stripes also :)

0
2

This sentance contains so much FAIL

Create a complex password using upper and lower case letters, numbers and special characters such as $%&!. Devise a way to differentiate your password for each site you use, for example putting the first and last letters of the web site name at the beginning and end of your initial complex password, making it unique yet easy to remember

0
2
Thumb Down

Then write them all down because you have more important things to do in life than remember umpteen million password combinations

2
0

cos...

if someone phishes your facebook password and finds its

ftw4tt!ngk

it aint gonna take a great leap of imagination to work out hotmail is

htw4tt!ngl

3
1
Silver badge
FAIL

All for the greater "glory"...

You want to look good; then simply dump data and assume people (esp. companies) will keep quiet about it. "Of course they denied it; they don't want to admit how l33t we are!". Truth is that a lot of people are starting to look right through this.

When those lulzsec dudes shared some of their stuff the same thing applied. Not talking about the ps3 hack but the stuff they "dumped from their collection".

Now, granted; without knowing what the source of that data was you can't really deem this legit or false (perhaps another tactical part they left out?). I'm also not going there, merely stating that I considered that data to be bogus too. An opinion I've seen shared by others as well.

This data turned out to be a 3-part collection of so called usernames and passwords which were accompanied with e-mail addresses. Rumor had it that it came from a website or other ISP.

When starting to check a few e-mail addresses I came across many invalid ones. While an account can easily expire over time the same cannot be easily said for TLD's. For example "hotmail.com.jj", that TLD has never existed and is most likely a typo. Or is it? Considering how common e-mail checks are these days I have some serious doubt there as well.

So in a majority of cases I think its not too unthinkable that "hackers" (or kiddies?) release bogus stuff to 'look good'.

0
0
Devil

Yeah right

"the use of the term Team Swastika does not necessarily imply neo-Nazi sympathies."

No, I'm sure they are simply unaware of the Nazi association with that symbol, and used it unwittingly. After all, few have heard of the Nazis these days, whereas ancient Hindu mysticism is enjoying something of a revival, especially amongst illegal activists.

1
7
Anonymous Coward

Re: Yeah right

Says the westerner.

Hindu (stupid word) mysticism is no more "ancient" than Christianity, etc.

They are almost certainly aware of the Nazi connection but will not see that as any reason to avoid using a symbol that originated in their faith / culture.

The Hindu swastika is noticeably different from the Nazi one.

4
0

Re: Yeah right

Given that the organisation are Nepalese and their first public targets were India, Bhutan, and Nepal (you know, all parts of the British Empire's Hindustan), it would seem far more likely they were influenced by Hinduism than National Socialism.

Since it remains quite common in that part of the world to see swastikas on pottery, in clothing and blankets, and decorating walls, your comment about "ancient Hindu mysticism" reflects your remarkable cultural ignorance about a religion that predates the Nazis by five hundred years and a symbol that predates the Nazis by four THOUSAND years.

0
0
M H
FAIL

@eddie

Idiot.

It's not uncommon to see swastikas in Asia, eg in school logos etc - I've seen them in several countries. The Thai word for hello (sawasdee สวัสดี) is derived from the same Sanskrit word (svasti) that the word swastika comes from.Perhaps you'd like to ban Thai people from saying hello, eh?

But since Asia *only* has a third of the world's population, let's use western history to censor them...

1
0
Anonymous Coward

There's another way to check... pick some accounts at random and try logging into facebook with them.

Do they work? If not, then likely it's all bullshit. If some work and other don't then are they trying to share legit info in plain view by making it look like crap?

1
0
Anonymous Coward

What?

Looking at that screenshot that is posted from the pastebin. The data comes from a IRC based botnet.

Also why does Facebook's quote say two opposite things? Are they trying to say Facebook itself wasn't hacked (well yeh) but some data was phish'd?

0
0
Silver badge
FAIL

Correction

"Team Swastika has only been around for a week but has already made itself look ridiculous."

There, got it for you.

1
0
This topic is closed for new posts.