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back to article HP and Hynix to produce the memristor goods by 2013

An HP/Hynix memristor product should be here in 18 months – and PCM, MRAM and RRAM are all memristor-type technologies... As reported by EETimes, this came out at the International Electronics Forum in Seville, in a presentation by Stan Williams, a senior HP Labs Fellow. The report quotes Williams saying: "We have a lot of big …

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HP... come on..

All is forgiven if you break through with well priced universal memory, that is to say, memory that is static, yet as fast as the DRAM we've been used to, and cheap.

If they can churn that kind of tech out, and it is proven and reliable, in only two years, then maybe they didn't need to fire Leo at all. They could fuck up everything else, as long as they don't can this.

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Anonymous Coward

This is just one of the projects that was saved from that idiot Prith's savaging of HP Labs. Stan and the lads probably through a combination of (a) being very good and (b) being close enough to the seats of power to ignore Banerjee survuved and look as though they are going to come very good.....

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quite amazing...

but I hold my bet until I see it working. And what are its write times anyway? 10ns read is all fine only as long as you don't have to wait ages when writing ....

one more thing: I would agree that NAND might be on its way out in a few years time (if memristor turns out to be what's promised), but it will take much, much longer to replace it completely. Just look at HDDs, magnetic tapes, MP3 players and DVD-ROMs. They are still alive and kicking, only confined to shrinking market segments.

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" Putting non-volatile memory on top of the logic chip will buy us twenty years of Moore's Law."

Me spies a fundamental problem...

Just how are they proposing to get the heat from the processor die to the heatsink then, with another chunk of chip in the way?

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Non-volatile storage directly on the core?

Hmm, not sure about that one. We don't put much RAM on the core - most RAM in a system lives elsewhere, and its data gets pulled across to the cache as needed. The point of memristors is that they get you fast rewriteable non-volatile storage. But the point of a cache is that it's *NOT* a permanent store.

You can't use it instead of RAM, that's for sure. 10^12 write cycles sounds amazing - but run the numbers and you find that even if you only wrote to it at 100kHz rate, that would only give you 115 days of continuous use. So we still need the old architecture of volatile data living in RAM for processing and input/output data being written elsewhere at infrequent intervals for long-term storage.

IOW, it's a really good, fast, reliable non-volatile storage mechanism. Nothing more, nothing less. Currently Flash SSDs are a bit niche, but it seems likely that memristor NV will basically blow away Flash and hard drives for everything except really large storage application, following the same principle as tape drives being used for storage/backup when hard drives were the fastest available technology for small/medium data.

Sure, the idea of "full shutdown" will basically go away. With near-instant storage of system state for hibernation and recovery, that's all anyone will do. But this is already the case - most people will already hibernate their laptops instead of doing a full shutdown.

So it really ain't a game-changer. It might change the names on the storage offerings, but it won't change what we do with PCs, how we do it, or how the system architecture is set up.

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Anonymous Coward

schizophrenic

On the one hand, HP bails out of tablets and looks like they're getting out of PCs too - in order to concentrate on software and services (e.g. by spunking way over the odds for Autonomy).

and OTOH, HP cuts some serious semiconductor mustard.

Joined up? right hand meet left hand ...

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Anonymous Coward

Nothing new here. HP Labs is (and has always been) where HP is actually good. It's just not that sexy to Wall Street. You have all those non-productive capital and R&D costs.

Services OTOH is very sexy mainly because it has a low capital cost. It's just that HP has not figured out that it's not something you can buy into, but have to build over a long long time. Consequently they keep throwing away (downsizing) the parts of their company that actually do services well, paying over the odds for an external services outfit and then failing to understand why customers don't like either their old or their new services offereings.

Start by having a quality product, and build your services around that. Throw away your product and customers will follow and get their servies from whereever they now get their (replacement) product.

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