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back to article Boffins place living creature under control of brain chip

Boffins at Tel Aviv University have successfully implanted an artificial cerebellum into the skull of a rat with brain damage and restored its ability to move. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that coordinates movements and it has a relatively straightforward neuronal architecture, which is why the researchers chose it …

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Silver badge

OK if house trained

If rats can be house trained and a small team able to make and bring a cup of tea then cheaper on upkeep than monkey butlers.

Now if the implanted ones can also persuade the rest to visit the National Institute of Mental Health we may solve finally the rodent problem. Of course it's Asia they are more a problem eating up to 1/3rd rice crop. Maybe the Asians need more snakes rather than Robo-Rats.

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Neat! I just hope they get to brain backups before I die.

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Anonymous Coward

On hoping they get to brain backups before one dies.

I think you'll find that this is relevant to your interests:

http://www.smbc-comics.com/index.php?db=comics&id=1968#comic

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Bronze badge
Coat

And the rodent's ID is: RAT a2E

(just feeling hungry - soz)

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Pint

"RAT a2E"

Very sublime; worth a free pint, at least... :-)

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Anonymous Coward

Always with the monkey butlers, you're so selfish.

Here we have a completely heart-warming story about how brain-damaged rats all round the world can finally look forward to some kind of medical treatment to help them in their tragic situation, and instead of focussing on how wonderful it will be for them to be able to resume a meaningful role in society and how happy this will make their families, all you can think of is monkey butlers? For shame, ElReg, for shame!

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Anonymous Coward

How do you find a rat with brain damage? Oh wait...

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Gold badge
WTF?

You mean there *isn't* an app for that?

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Neal Stephenson: "Interface"

Anyone else thinking of this one?

(And the consequences of WUBBA WUBBA WUBBA WUBBA WUBBA...)

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Terminator

@"terrifying science fiction, enhance healthy brain function"

Why terrifying? ... I can't wait. :)

I would love to live long enough to see us all reach the level of a Technological Singularity. :)

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Bronze badge

Have you never seen

Pinky and the brain?

Its terrifying.

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Anonymous Coward

Robo-Rats

This seems a little mean to the poor rat and his colleagues - most of whom were probably permanently disabled in trials. I suppose it is acceptable given the goal of reversing certain types of human disability though..

But given it's origin I expect we are more likely to see remotely-controlled rat robo-soldiers being used to wipe out palestinians, before the technology gets used for anything more humane.

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Oh My Word!

This might be a solid step towards meaningful spinal repair, improvements to certain types of alzheimers and parkinsons, and a prospect of some sort of future for ALS patients.

I'd much rather less invasive drug/gene/stem cell approaches, but this could be here _soon_.

Turn the clock forward twenty or thirty years, what are we going to choose, an implant that we know is second rate, or waiting ten years for a better biological solution?

Impressive work.

(And not from Kevin Warwick? Shurely Shome MIshtake!)

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Meh

Cyborg Rats

May I be the first to acknowlege and welcome our cyborg rat overlords?

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Joke

Politicians next, then. Should take much to map their brains.

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Terminator

May I be the first

to welcome or new muroidean overlords.........

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Paris Hilton

Can I get some of these for certain members of my team?

I think I could easily sell the idea of robo-brained developers to my boss.

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Terminator

Brainzz

when zombies are defetaed following World War Z, we can use these chips to train a number of them for mundain taks suchs as cleaning sewers and streets.

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Bronze badge

@AndrueC: They tried, couldn't find an electron microscope powerful enough...

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Facepalm

I probably shouldn't joke. I couldn't even type 'shouldn't' properly the first time :)

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Joke

Go EASY on your EBEs

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdI_MmN-Lp4#t=4m25s

This notice issued by the Brain Information Council

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Anonymous Coward

Anyone seen prof Warwick ?

Just wondered where our own captain cyborg has got to nowadays ?

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Anonymous Coward

Captain Cyborg? This is a million light years out of his league.

Involving, as it does, real hardcore neurobiology, as opposed to shallow attention-seeking scientific-content-free self-publicity. Warwick isn't fit to pass these guys a scalpel.

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Anonymous Coward

He's around ...

He was on Radio 4 a few months ago.

Nothing changed, of course. Still the same as he ever was.

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Gimp

Enhanced Brain Function

I want a maths co-processor.

Then a graphics card.

Wireless connectivity.

Extra memory.

Compass.

Google Maps, Wikipedia, a grammar checker, a separate program to make my body do exercise while I'm sleeping...

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Silver badge

Eh....this is an old story. It was on Yahoo news early last week. What gives Reg? You guys normally pick up on this sort of thing much quicker than this.

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Anonymous Coward

hummm

Me wonders when hacker are going to take an interest in hacking rats?

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Death to the future overlords.

Put a cortex bomb on that chip and if they start to rebel, pop the cortex bomb and render the rat immobile.

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Questionable scientific practice.

The results are skewed, I presume they didn't find a brain damaged rat and so set out to damage its brain after they found it which makes me wonder if it was damaged at all and how it was damaged if it was. It might be that the scientists damaged the rat in a way that they wanted that suited their chip which means the chip came before the problem, leaving a single application, and as such invalidates the results. You can make something spasm with electric, any torturer knows that.

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