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back to article Virtualising your infrastructure? Get your numbers right

Virtualisation can be a powerful tool for your IT department, making your infrastructure far more efficient. But without proper planning it is easy to trip yourself up by not scaling the system properly. How can you plan the capacity needed for a virtualised system so that you don’t end up overspending or under-resourcing? Here …

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Facepalm

Whoever coined the term "private cloud" should be banned from working in IT for life.

That is all.

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Bronze badge
Facepalm

I'd extend that...

To the whole meaningless cloud terminology.

Ask ten vendor's sales-drones what 'the cloud' is, and you'll get ten self-serving answers.

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Anonymous Coward

..and dont forget IPv6

Also ensure that your new virtualised data centre can handle the IPv6 protocol (for hosted services and management) - and not just on a promise from the vendor. You wouldn't want your new, shiny, expensive, next generation data centre to be looking decidedly old-hat and out-of-date within a couple of years when everyone is requiring IPv6 connectivity

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Whether you like the terminology or not in this well written article, you should heed the advice! Planning is essential and Centrix Software recommend to analyze and plan. Analysis using WorkSpace iQ analytics software will give you not only installed apps but usage too - essential for sizing infrastructure. Why build back end resources to support desktops and apps that are never used?!

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Silver badge

compare and contrast.

"Managing virtual systems over a single network fabric can make life far easier for administrators, decreasing management costs while maintaining system uptime."

and

"Designing multiple failure zones that are segmented in different parts of the system is a good idea, so that no part of the infrastructure can be compromised at any one time."

Sounds like someone reading advertising copy.

They are mutually exclusive. You can either have simplicity(manageability) or redundancy; long gone are the days of "just find a port and plug it in" networking.

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