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back to article Diminutive robot to attempt Iron Man Triathalon

A 20-inch robot powered by just three rechargeable batteries will take on the gruelling Iron Man triathlon course. Because it can. The robot – consisting of a small green and white body and a modest battery-pack will have to swim, run and bike for 230km (143miles). Mr Evolta comes with three interchangeable body parts, which …

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Terminator

Yes but ....

Can it make a cup of tea and change grannie's nappy?

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Anonymous Coward

Interesting.

It will take 14 times longer than my wife, but I suspect it is a lot cheaper to run. :-)

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Happy

Re: Interesting

No wonder you posted as an AC with a comment like that about your wife.

But there again, if you didn't, she may have been tried for Assault and Battery.

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Anonymous Coward

Obvious

She represents GB - and is massively fitter than I am. Do you think I am daft?

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Bronze badge

Erm...

"Of course there's not much practical benefit to a robot capable of completing triathlons. Same way as it's not a very practical skill for humans. Get in a car why don't you?"

I don't have an amphibious car...

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FAIL

"get in a car why dont you"

Because THAT will help you in the ocean.....

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Get in a Car

It's the cycling stage I'd be most interested to see a car do.

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Terminator

But WHY?!?

Now we'll never be able to get away from them. Not even on floating sea-cities like in Waterworld!

May I be the first to welcome out all-running, all-swimming, all-cycling overlords that just keep going and going and goind and...

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Silver badge

Duracell

Are they going to do a test that is far more practical and has an immediate application?

If Duracell use mechanical bunnies to demonstrate longer-life batteries why not a slight twist and put them in a rabbit - not Flopsy but the 'personal massager' type.

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Stop

I wish...

Battery manufacturers should be made to publish the capacity of their batteries, just like rechargeable batteries do.

I think a lot more people would use rechargeable batteries if they realised how much higher capacity they are.

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Publishing capacities

Battery manufacturers should only be made to publish capacities on non-rechargeables if they also publish self-discharge rates at room temperature for rechargeables.

Standard NiMH rechargeables lose betwee 0.5% and 1% of their charge each day. They are great for frequent use items, but otherwise....

(For comparison, standard non-rechargeables lose around 1% in 6 months, and Eneloop-style rechargeables lose around 1% in four weeks.)

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Silver badge
Stop

hmm

dont forget temperature too. Dont expect your nimh batteries to have much juice in them if you have them in your glove box on a winter morning.

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"Because THAT will help you in the ocean....."

Didn't stop James Bond

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mAH

I've just trawled through the many pages of ther web site that they have filled with blurb about how wonderful this new battery is. There is not a single mention of it's mAH capacity. How are we supposed to know if it's any better than their previous batteries or their competitors?

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Bronze badge

No real comparison to their own batteries, either

The battery doesn't even have a comparison to their own Oxy-Alkaline battery, and it seems that in some cases the Oxy-Alkaline product may last longer.

The real question is, are these going to be used for submersibles? There's the Seahorse, with 9,216 D-cell batteries. Are they going to switch to the new tech, eh?

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