back to article Intel preps 15-Watt 'Sandy Bridge' for micro servers

Micro servers – those tiny machines suitable for dedicated hosting and Web infrastructure workloads – are not exactly taking the market by storm, but they are carving out a niche for themselves. At the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco today, Naveen Bohra, a product marketing engineer at the chip maker, trotted out …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

meh_32.png

Define "micro-servers".

Generally available or 'enterprise' channel only?

0
0
Silver badge

Another argument for ARM

"This part will only be available for micro servers and will not be available for desktop systems."

If I buy a chip, the manufacturer does not tell me what I can and can't do with it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Market_segment#Price_Discrimination

2
0
Silver badge
Meh

Crap graphics?

I'd expect it to have completely crap SVGA 2D on-chip graphics. So not so much "not available", as "not suitable for". (Of course if it has enough PCI-X lanes you could integrate it with a third-party graphics chip, but you'd probably lose most of the power advantage by doing that)

0
0
Silver badge

Micro Servers

Would be great for the home, really nice and quiet, but I can't find one with multiple NICs and at least HP's Proliant Microserver only has PCI-E slots so multi-port NICs are still expensive.

0
0
Bronze badge
Childcatcher

Perfect

This will be perfect for the "Nativisation" revolution just around the corner when people decide that bare metal is the way forward :)

2
0
Anonymous Coward

"are not exactly taking the market by storm"

Are you sure? what do you think it is driving that NAS box in the corner. especially when that NAS box is a Media Server, Web server, torrent client etc...

0
0
Anonymous Coward

The chip inside... the OS inside...

"what do you think it is driving that NAS box in the corner. especially when that NAS box is a Media Server, Web server, torrent client etc.."

That sounds like a Linux box. A Linux box don't need x86 inside. Only a Window box needs x86 inside, and even that may be subject to change before too long (but will it last longer than it did last time?)

1
0
Anonymous Coward

it is linux yes. Being x86 it enables the server to run so many more useful apps that will only work on x86 architechture. (off the top of my head say a minecraft server)

heres an x86 Nas box:

http://www.qnap.com/pro_detail_hardware.asp?p_id=178

and an arm equiv:

http://www.qnap.com/pro_detail_hardware.asp?p_id=182

0
0
Anonymous Coward

"what I can and can't do with [a chip]"

"If I buy a chip, the manufacturer does not tell me what I can and can't do with it."

Maybe they just tell you what will cause you to lose your Intel-provided co-marketing funding and similar sweeteners?

And in this instance one might speculate that co-marketing funding, preferred partner pricing, etc would be at risk for any outfit that dares to put microserver chips in non-microserver hardware?

0
0

Intel says...

OK. First Intel tries to push the market with GHz on Northbridge and gets GHz moved up from 0.7 to 2.8/3.5. Then Intel keeps it at the 2.3/3.5 GHz for eight years and switches over to high core-count. Now that core-count are not-drawing crowds, they are moving down to lower GHz and much lower power.

Cool, so long as you are confident that Intel is pulling the market where your company needs it to go.

1
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums