back to article Office and Windows fixes star in quiet Patch Tuesday

September's Patch Tuesday will include five bulletins, none of which are rated as critical. The patch batch marks the first update in recent times that omits any critical bugs but that's not to say it ought to be ignored. Vulnerability scanning and security services firm Qualys says attention should be directed towards flaws in …

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Anonymous Coward

Yet another reason

to migrate from Microsoft products to Lunix or OSX.

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Flame

How so? No need for critical fixes is surely a good thing, as is the fact they're continuing to update the products on a weekly basis to cover less major issues.

I'm not a Microsoft lover by any means and don't normally comment but these 'I h@tez M$ buy Linux!!' comments get a bit repetitive when there's no real justification.

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Anonymous Coward

Yeah...

I updated my Fedora laptop on Monday and by Thursday there weren't another 30 packages to be updated. Oh, wait, yes there were.

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BTW

And how many of them were of the "remote code execution" type?

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just another reason for it ...

Buy Linux??? Isn't it free? No, you have to BUY MS Windows preinstalled on most PC's even if you don't want to.

Having said this, I admit, fixing bugs is good, however, M$ is not doing its job quite well there either , to say nothing about swarming ubiquitous Windows vulnerabilities which are not bugs but features.

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Well,

There's an "as-yet-unspecified remote code execution flaw" that isn't critical. -That- worries me.

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Anonymous Coward

Well...

..if it requires you to have granted full access to your machine and they need to know knitting, be fluent in Cantonese and ancient Greek as well as having 3 left arms. Then it may not be classed as critical.

It's all in the context.

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Anonymous Coward

@Philscompany

If the Windows operating system was any good then they wouldn't NEED to supply patches every Tuesday...

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Anonymous Coward

That was...

Such an easy troll. I didn't even try to hide it. I guess it shows the level of technical knowledge on these boards once a month when Tuesday comes around.

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WTF?

Re: How many were remote code execution

Follow the links. three remote code executions and two privilege escalations.

Nothing critical though. I mean, who'd think of using two vulnerabilities in the same attack?

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Yea, please migrate

Yea migrate, setup thousands of dollars of software and clients and just because $4000 software won't run fine on latest OS X or, that secretary really doesn't need a i7 to check mail, be abandoned by Apple at a very critical software update.

MS has transformed itself security wise and they even invent these things like "patch tuesday" and "pre release" of whatever coming.

They just released diginotar remover patch for Windows XP. OS X has glitch in ocsp checking of ev certs since version 10.0 and Apple didn't bother to fix it for OS X Leopard. An Operating System used widely by business/design/serious work since 3rd parties demand thousands of dollars in upgrades to work fine in later operating systems.

Anyway, for the psychopatic fan following my posts: I said bad thing about Apple above. Press red button and keep pressing.

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Anonymous Coward

Fix * in {Quiet Patch Tuesday}

Is "star" a wildcard - i.e. they've fixed everything?

(Would have a smile or joke icon, but anonymous jokes are not welcome any more...)

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WTF?

MS in the future

They seem to have released full details in the summary this time. i.e. KB numbers, full details etc. And it's been published in the future - "Published: Tuesday, September 13, 2011"

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/security/bulletin/ms11-sep-sum

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Anonymous Coward

MS

Winblows is so very great that we need to update it with patches every Tuesday. Of course, we do test it before we release it, we just don't do a very good job of it - but hey, you shmucks are stupid enough to buy it...

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Anonymous Coward

Sigh...

The only thing that stops you being the most piss-poor troll ever is the lack of a random capitalised word.

Try better next time.

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Megaphone

Since we're talking updates...

Now that OpenOffice is no more, all hail LibreOffice, I hope that they're now finally going to look into the upgrade procedure sometime.

Upgrading OO, ok; sorry: LO, isn't so much upgrading but basically re-installing. Usually all goes well, but often you're down to setting up and filling out all your personal information yet again. Which, at times, can be extremely frustrating.

Truth be told I guess I already "sold my soul" according to some people; now fully & happily using MS Office 2010, but that doesn't mean that you'll now see me ditching or putting LibreOffice down. /Far/ from it.

I'm also not trying to compare the upgrade procedure with Windows update (which can also apply updates to other components like Office), but I really hope that they'll go for a smarter installer sometimes. One which can both install, re-install and upgrade and /only/ upgrade.

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config files

>>you're down to setting up and filling out all your personal information yet again.

Isn't it the "Windows' approach" to configuration you're talking about? Which is a sequence of (often annoying) dialogs and forms to fill out. It is versus config text files, the Unix (POSIX) approach to it. In the latter case one has to keep such files in a safe place (home dir usually) and no hassle with upgrades.

I can now see a few people trying to say, that text config files are likewise a "Windows' approach". Well .. not too many Windie users are aware of it.. When I teach a class and ask my engineering students to submit their results for a CAS project in the plain text files, I quite often hear this back: "what is a text file after all?"

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Anonymous Coward

@eulampios

You teach engineering students and you can't tell the difference between a dialogue box used to assist an end user in configuring software and the back end database which stores the configuration?

As it happens the user's portion of the registry is stored in their profile and follows them round. The problem the OP was talking about is that the installer for Libre Office doesn't just take the Open Office entries out of the registry and use them as its own. That sort of thing can happen across OSes, if LO doesn't use the .conf files for OO in Linux, the upshot is the same. Both OSes allow for the user to do a bit of command line hacking to copy those settings across, but it's not that easy for an end user.

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@AC

Well, which "databases" are you talking about? Why to use it at all? Compare configuring Far and mc file managers. Both of them being "orthodox" and quite good. However, Far has no text config file to edit. Which is pretty annoying at times... Mc does have one in ~/.mc/bindings as most of Unix-way programs. No need to use databases to get mutt up and running, e.g.

PS The class I mentioned was Lin. Algebra with Applications.

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Anonymous Coward

@@ac

The registry is the configuration database on Windows. You do know bout the registry, don't you? I am beginning to think you don't.

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registry hell

Oh yeah, isn't it related to the so called "registry hell"?

A few times I was asked by friends to install Linux on their Windows boxen. An when I try to gather some info about a PC, defrag etc I would notice an unbearable (for me as a Linux user) sluggishness of the system and would first blame the hardware... until Linux is installed that runs much faster than XP. However, a newly installed XP is not that slow. It does not happen to Linux , i.e., it does not "age".

The question is what is the culprit? Some people say, it is the windows registry.

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Anonymous Coward

Another year, Another patch

Here's where I think Microsoft drops the ball. There's a troll in this thread who keeps saying "patch Tuesday is every week", if only he/she would have re-worded it to say, "Patch Tuesday ought to be every week" in other words the frequency of updates should be increased from a month. It's not logical to wait to roll out a working patch.

Then again, I would also argue it's not logical to EOL XP at a time where the world is on the brink of disaster, production wise, monetarily, financially and everything else.

The other ordeal here is Linux has an apt-get update approach to patching. Or you can ftp down the individual files. (windows used to let you ftp in, but the fud about registration wrecked it)

The equal in the windows world is Secunia. And while they do an outstanding job, it isn't apt-get update.

it's like microsoft just thinks oh let's only patch the kernel and KDE and that's it. Everything else is open game. It's not logical. Anything they say about security is a joke until they address these problems.

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Patch Tuesday is once a month to allow people to plan updates correctly. Once you're managing patches for more than 20 or so computers you can't afford to be testing and releasing updates every week.

Couple that with the fact that even most home users don't want to be continually bombarded with patches and please reboot messages.

If you're insane you can still download all the individual patches and install them manually, but if you're a normal individual you just use the windows update process. If you're a business then you use WSUS.

Microsoft update all software that they supply via the update mechanism. Linux distros update all the software they supply, no difference. Maybe Microsoft will launch an Apple style app store for windows. If they do this you'll start seeing updates for other 3rd party software.

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