back to article The Torvalds of Drupal pledges HTML5 mobile love

One of the primary building blocks of yesterday's web is limbering up to become a mover and shaker in mobile – but it might just spend longer in training than you'd like. Dries Buytaert, the Linus Torvalds of open-source content management systems (CMS), has told The Reg that websites built on Drupal 8 will default to being …

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Anonymous Coward

"display pages smoothly on screens of varying sizes"

HTML 5 has tables?

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Drupal: It's about the modules

Basically, Drupal gives you the skeleton. Whether you dress that up to produce a Jennifer Lopez or a Bella Emberg depends on which modules you base your design on - and whether they can be persuaded to work properly.

Most Drupal modules are, let's say, pieces of hobby code - written by amateurs for their own reasons. When Drupal 7 was being prepped, there was a major initiative to house-clean and "certify" some of the most popular modules, in an effort to whip the Drupal world into some sort of shape. So while the number of modules that can claim some sort of association with some version of Drupal may well be in the 6-figures, the number "blessed" by drupal.org is an order of magnitude less than that. The number that are known to work with Drupal7 is a bit over 2,000.

However, there are probably less than a couple of hundred freely available Drupal7 modules that form the core of reliable, inter-workable and documented code that website designers reach for when creating a Drupal7 site. Even then, the knowledge of HTML, XML, CSS, PHP and a whole lot more alphabetti-spaghetti that you need to know, to get them customised for a professional standard website is huge. Worse: amount of expertise necessary to work out what the hell the previous web designer did, to produce the (undocumented - for they are ALL undocumented) website you're being asked to modify is nothing short of miraculous.

One would presume that to get the next incarnation of Drupal to spit HTML5 would require these modules to change hymnsheets and go through a rewrite process similar to the ones they did to attain Drupal7 standards. It will be interesting to see how many make the grade and how much work will be needed to cut a website across from Drupal7 to Drupal8 - even with all the redesigned needed for a mobile, postage-stamp-sized screen.

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are you trolling

or genuinely clueless? Most drupal modules that are heavily used, particularly the ones in 7 are professionally built by drupal shops for customers who pay for that functionality or sponsor modules. That's not including all the google summer code projects and acquia modules. The you have the more simple side of it. Modules at best generate snippets of html code. There will be nothing in that code (since it will be match xhtml standards) that does not already drop into html 5. So that point is invalid anyway but since drupal seperates mark up out of modules into templates and theme functions even if some did need changing it would be very easy to do and the community would do it if the original module writer does not.

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Anonymous Coward

snippits

And with Drupal a 2 line piece of code that outputs hello world is considered a module. They have a LOT of those little snippits.

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I wonder

Is this article about Apple or Drupal?

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Linux

Weird huh?

Who'd have thought that there was only one mobile device that you could write native apps for?

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WTF?

How does HTML5 make mobile easier?

Surely it's just a markup language? The presentation of a site, including how wide it is etc. is the CSS. Using media queries makes adapting for screen sizes easy peasy, but that's something that's been done for a while now without needing HTML5.

Is this another example of 'HTML5' being a blanket buzzword for webby wonderousness, or have I missed some wonderful HTML5 attribute that automagically resizes a site for mobile?

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Anonymous Coward

Have a look

http://www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff/#new-elements

Trying to have fewer plugins is the obvious one.

Adding structural mark-up is another.

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WTF?

Poorly written

Gavin, were you under a deadline to release this? Are you suffering from jet lag? Did it even get proofread? The article reads like the regurgitation of undigested notes made at a keynote.

HTML 5 (yes, I know officially it's written without the space), wow, big news. That is by and a large a simple DTD, which notably does not include a version number, that activates standards mode rendering with some optional new tags thrown in for good measure which make handmade markup significantly easier on the eye. The rest is effectively largely formalising current practices.

"HTML5 includes tags so that elements like forms can be rendered on different devices without needing to hard code them into their parent site"

Excuse me, what did you say? HTML 5 forms do not include new tags. New attributes at best. The new input types include support for richer native widgets such as sliders, calendars and colour pickers, they also support client-side content checking without javascript. All very nice but this is largely moving client functionality from JS libraries to a specification. That makes things more hard coded than before.

As for Drupal's structure and development procedure, still looks a long way behind the foundation and proposal approach common to systems like Plone.

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Drupal twaddle

Actually there's no fundamental format difference between the way core Drupal 8 renders pages and the way Drupal 7 or 6 does because Drupal's theming engine handles form presentation, and the engine and the themes it consumes are very easily extended or modified. If I wanted HTML5 form extensions to my Drupal 6 installation, I could write a module that added the ability for developers to add extra attributes to enable those extensions, or forcibly inject these attributes into existing forms defined elsewhere. And I could write a theme that exported my entire site into XML, just as I can with RSS. This isn't new, it's a press release for the gullible. When Drupal moves to proper OO methodology, wake me up then.

In any case it seems you think HTML5 adds something which magically makes pages render better on mobile devices apart from, obviously, audio and video. But that's Javascript and CSS3, not HTML. A page written purely in HTML5 looks and feels just as crap on a mobile device as one written purely in HTML4.

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Anonymous Coward

it's a press release for the gullible

Of course... it's aimed at drupal users... if they were not gullible they would be suing TYPO3. Or if stupid and gullible: wordpress

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"The Torvalds of Drupal"

That's like calling someone "the Ron Jeremy of five knuckle shuffling".

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Anonymous Coward

Verbs, nouns, you sly dog

Dries pledges drupal 8 will have html 5.

bring it on, the more the better for drupal. Bring your browser, bring your spiders, bring your rss readers bring your phones, bring your luls cannons, bring your scripts.

At the end of the day, I wonder what the "torvalds of gnome" were smoking with that rocket moon monkey window manager interface. It could have been better but for the missing fog and lazer light show effect buttons, or a road sign pointing to the "app game store."

Let's put some KFC of advertising in the kernel!

for the record I meant the "torvalds of gnome" = Sheriff of Huddersfield er, I mean Miguel de Icaza

eating one .NUT at a time.

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