Feeds

back to article Argentina: home of Bavarian lager

Beer has been around for millennia, but lager is more recent, invented in Germany about 600 years ago. Its secret is a particular yeast, and now American scientists believe they’ve identified an ancestor of that yeast – in Argentina. Lager brewers use a yeast called Saccharomyces pastorianus which ferments at lower temperatures …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Bronze badge
Pint

those that ignore history are doomed to what?

Is it possible that some of the [political refugees] from Germany in the mid-1940's took their lager secrets, along with thier wives, children and gold, to Argentina?

...that seem's like the appropriate icon.

0
0
Ru
Silver badge
Facepalm

those who don't read articles are doomed to what?

Pastorianus is a hybrid. Some of its genes are known to come from cerevisiae, some from an unknown parent. Eubayanus is an exceedingly close match with those genes of unknown source.

Patagonian natives used the galls containing eubayanus to make a kind of beer.

Eubayanus already seems to enjoy a widespread and will established niche in the patagonian ecosystem.

It has been carefully studied by people who actually know about yeasts and genetics. Admittedly, they aren't Omnicapable Internet Forum Dwellers, but you know, I think they might know their stuff.

None of these things point to it being a recent invasive species.

1
0
Silver badge

More probably ...

The large influx of Germans in Argentina brought lager yeast, and this is a mutation of that. Or so says my lizard hind-brain ...

0
0
Happy

Home sweet Home

This probably explains the Nazi exodus after WWII. http://www.theregister.co.uk/Design/graphics/icons/comment/happy_32.png

1
0
Pint

I think I know ...

... it was the vikings that brought the yeast to Europe (they did cross the pond around 1000, didn't they?)

3
0
Pint

Now now!

All those Ivy League domineerers will tell you that Europeans got here in 1620! Do no doubt them! They've cut me down when I mentioned my ancestors being in Jamestown, VA, in 1618 ...

But you make a good point. There was at least one German among the Vikings in Greenland and/or Vinland. There is some evidence that the English were fishing off Cape Cod well before Jamestown was founded. So could be.

(Obvious icon, I hope.)

0
0
Bronze badge
IT Angle

another chinese import ?

perhaps brought by one of the chinese fleets of the 15th century if the books 1490 (ITIRC) and so on can be believed ? by accident or in a booze sample ?

0
0
WTF?

1421 was the year ...

... but although the book is an entertaining read it is regarded by most serious historians as a load of nonsense.

0
0
Silver badge
Pint

Thank the yeasty goodness

Keep on the hunt boys! Sample as much as you can and don't forget to compare and contrast the differences between S. pastorianus and S. cerevisiae. There are subtle differences that can only be distinguished by extensive field research. Now then, hoist those glasses and get back to work.

1
0
Alien

@Theodore and Jake.

That wouldn't explain why no examples of the wild yeast have been found in Europe.

I blame aliens or God. Something is testing our faith.

0
0
Silver badge
Boffin

Yeast spores could potentially travel far

even by wind. So maybe this species of yeast is more widely spread than was thought.

1
0
Bronze badge

Another reason

Explaining why not found in Europe - it died out.

Supplanted by cultivated forms over the centuries or its environment altered by changes in land use?

0
0
Holmes

y.a.f.t.

Spawn of the South Atlantic barf gyre.

1
0
Boffin

Alternatively

Perhaps the 99.5% match between strains of yeast is not close enough, especially considering a human and chimp are a 96% match.

1
0
This topic is closed for new posts.