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back to article Shetland 'Topiary' suspect extended in custody for 3 days

The Metropolitan Police has been granted another three days to question the suspected hacker arrested on the Shetland Islands yesterday. A spokeswoman for the Met said: "We've successfully applied to Horseferry Road Magistrates Court for a warrant to keep him for another three days. He is British and we are not looking for …

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Anonymous Coward

well

the filth is probably happy they now have some "terrorists" that actually exist and are easy to find.

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Anonymous Coward

Err...

"The Filth"? Do try to grow up a bit.

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RE: well

".....some "terrorists" that actually exist....." Yeah, 'cos those fake bombs on 7th July 2005 were such a disappointment.

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Anonymous Coward

yeah...

...and there's been soooo many bombs since, and don't say that's because of vigilance of the police, because that really would be bollocks.

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Re: Re: Well

> > some "terrorists" that actually exist and are easy to find.

> Yeah, 'cos those fake bombs on 7th July 2005 were such a disappointment.

Does whatever language you program in not have the logical AND operator?

But since then ... it's all been a rather expensive lesson in tilting at windmills. Islamogeddon isn't around the corner.

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Trollface

@AC "The Filth"? Do try to grow up a bit.

Actually with the level of corruption being uncovered in recent years in the police, the description of "the Filth" is quite apt again...

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Shoddy reporting

Hello.....the name of the group is "LulzSec" and there motto is "for the lulz" they are trolling the media here and the register took the bait. Good reporting! The suspect IS Topiary. You think the met police were actually duped? the only people that were duped were the media here into believing the met police had the wrong guy. Hilarious.

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@AC 17:14

Shoddy trolling.

It wasn't LulzSec, it was a rival group claiming that the arrested man wasn't the real Topiary. And ElReg did report it as such, mentioning exactly that caveat.

Try to read as well as try comprehending what you've read, and keep in mind that the average Reg reader is a bit sharper than you're apparently used to dealing with (including yourself).

Apart from that, the police have never shown to be fallible, eh? Especially in the area of cybercrime, their eminent area of expertise.

Now go away before I taunt you a second time.

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Windows

But...

...does he have the Ass Burgers? That's the important thing.

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Anonymous Coward

"Police landed in a light aircraft before grabbing their man and leaving"

in a slightly heavier aircraft.

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Coffee/keyboard

Thanks

@TooMuchCoffee - in a slightly heavier aircraft.

My head hurts now and my sides are killing me. Thanks that made my day.

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Go

Re: "Police landed in a light aircraft before grabbing their man and leaving"

"in a slightly heavier aircraft."

Hey, surely Neo has no weight?

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"Hey, surely Neo has no weight?"

Only when jacked-in to the Machine World. And that is all... 0{;-)o<

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Anonymous Coward

Thinking outside the IT box again

My first thought on reading "Shetland Topiary suspect" was some kind of hedge-trimming crime (maybe cutting out the wrong kind of cock shape?).

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erm

pwned! I believe is the term.

lulz!

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mtp
Holmes

Wicker man?

Hmm this sounds familiar.

Was it Edward Woodwood making the arrest? Someone is going to end up in a wicker man.

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Windows

Thought that was Cornwall...

Dunno

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The important question is

Did Topiary hack GW Bush?

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Paris Hilton

Did someone mention Bush?

Now, this is not connected, but reminds me of a quote from one of the US presidential campaigns where Gary Hart was seeking the Democratic Party nomination and George Bush Sr was one of the Republican hopefuls. The Gary Hart/Donna Rice (Monkey Business) affair had just surfaced.

The quote refers to the effect on some women voters -

"My heart is for Bush, but my bush is for Hart".

1987/8?

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Re: The important question is

"Did Topiary hack GW Bush?"

What a disappointment it would be; nothing in the brain, or brainstem, except perhaps for a (cough) 'pretzel'.

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Stop

Why transported to England

Dear Reg (unless anyone who knows the answer),

Can you ask some legal type up north what the rules are around what crimes are required to be alleged or whatever to get some accused crim rendered to the south for interrogation?

It does seem a slightly interesting matter - can the Met just decide for themselves to go nab someone from a significantly devolved bit of blighty?

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Windows

"I'd be a bit miffed if I was dragged London for a crime committed in Yorkshire.."

I'm so happy someone else has implied Yorkshire isn't in England. So, I'm sure, is the rest of Yorkshire...

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Unhappy

Should hackers go to prison?

I do not think that teenagers who hack for fun rather that for profit should face long prison sentences. The computer skills that they are learning will probably some day benefit society. If the same teenagers smoked pot then the police would do nothing despite the fact that pot damages their brains.

The basic problem is that one in ten IT managers do not apply security patches and so leave their systems open to hackers. It is those IT managers who should be sacked/imprisoned not the teenagers who foolishly hack into their systems. I have read that many of the systems hacked by anonymous were known in advance to be vunerable but these IT managers ignored warnings from white hat hackers. The only way to get through to these IT managers was to commit acts of cybervandalism.

The US authorities think that by handing out enormous prison sentences they will scare hackers into stopping their activities. What they fail to appreciate is that the internet is universal and if they stop attacks from the US, the UK, the Netherlands and Italy then the attacks will continue from countries where their influence is more limited such as Malasia or China. The only way to reduce the hacking problem is to sack jobsworth IT managers.

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Windows

Again a dichotomy...(trichotomy??)

"The US authorities think that by handing out enormous prison sentences* they will scare hackers into stopping their activities"

And: "If the same teenagers smoked pot then the police would do nothing despite the fact that pot damages their brains."

And:

The only way to reduce the hacking problem is to sack jobsworth IT managers.

*Yep. let's send them to jail for 300 years to life. Or, alternately, let them serve the same sentence of the only person convicted of the My Lai massacre. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Lai_Massacre)

Tthat seems fair.

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Big Brother

Making the time to fitting the crime

no HTML

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Windows

Another 3 days?

Isn't that the strongest admission by the Met that they are beginning to realize they might have the wrong guy?

They apply for this for terrorists, not normally "hackers".

Oh well, as Donald Rumsfelt said about waterboarding, "A little water doesn't hurt anyone".

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Anonymous Coward

Err...

No, it usually means quite the opposite. The police have to convince a judge that they have good reason to keep the suspect in custody, this is usually because questioning is going in an interesting direction.

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Funny that many of us only heard the name Topiary...

...a few days ago when the Sun got hacked...

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Windows

"Met police and the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency and Lincolnshire Police."

Just having a bit of trouble here.

Drug Enforcement Agency? Linconshire Police? Shetland Isles? Sorry, can't quite get it.

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Joke

Suspect extended in custody?

I know that torture is acceptable these days, but using the rack? That's a bit barbaric even for the Met.

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Access to lawyers

I suppose, with this long trip back to London, a smart defence lawyer could ask some awkward questions about possible asking of questions without a chance of a lawyer being present. And, while it's a UK-wide crime, how does this all interact with Scots law? There's likely nothing new there, but can a London lawyer spot any flaws there might be arising from those legal differences?

Why London and not Edinburgh?

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I'm guessing

He is accused of attacking the Serious Organised Crime Agency, an English law enforcement body, so that's why he gets extradited to England; in the same way that someone in England who attacks the CIA gets extradited to the USA.

However, what confuses me is that the people who attempted to bomb Glasgow Airport were also extradited to England for questioning and I can see no link with England in that attack, so maybe it is something to do with terrorism laws?

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Gold badge

Yeah actually

I thought the same thing as TooMuchCoffee, I thought "Shetland 'Topiary' suspect" was going to mean someone got nicked for cutting their hedgerow to look like a horse cock or something.

Ahh well.

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Holmes

He's now been officially charged,

according to the BBC website

"Jake Davis, 18, was charged with unauthorised computer access and conspiracy to carry out a distributed denial of service attack on the Serious Organised Crime Agency's website.

He faces five charges and is due to appear at Westminster Magistrates' Court on Monday, police said."

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Anonymous Coward

Damn!

"Look guys, we arrested him! We can't just let him go...try and find something on him while I abuse things to keep him another 3 days, chop chop"

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"...an intelligence-led operation..."

What other kinds of operations are there?

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Anonymous Coward

"intelligence-led operation by Met police"

I just thought that statement was a perfect example of an oxymoron.

This is the same bunch who employ top brass on £180K plus, who cannot read or more than one suspect in a crime.

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Devil

One Point of Order

"What other kinds of operations are there?"

Well, lessee....Faulty-intelligence-driven operations of many kinds are apparently still popular Stateside... These are the sort of State-sponsored violent actions wherein the desired goal (a profitable quagmire) is relentlessly pursued to the Quagmire Point in private, while all manner of usefully complicit tea-types and Privatized Military Contractors sneer 'n' giggle in public, all the way to the bank.

Highly profitable for the faultily-intelligenced participants+complicits. Ergo the fuzzy+narrow proprietary definition of torture, contempt for the Normal Rule of Normal Law, and the interminability of all such actions. It is one sure-fire high-hand way to Make+Take Mo' Munneh, y'see.

Those who see to the spilling of such beans as these are of course demonized and lumped in with all the rest of the Enemy Forces. Standard practice; been done again and again. Only difference this time is this Internet Thingie we now hold dear.

Spawn o'Satan icon for the source of all such deeds. Forget the politix. It's the crime that counts. Nobody but the Criminal Sponsor(s) need ever benefit. You and I et al are made to Pay, Pay, Pay. (Got austerity?)

PAY NOW and suffer Normally! Or don't, and suffer Differently. And that is all. 0{:-|0<

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Windows

I still think they got the wrong bloke

But, we'll see.

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Happy

So funny!

All the Dikileakers and Anonyputz-lovers posting "the cops iz stooopid, they'll never catch us", etc, etc, when they're all wetting their pants because they KNOW the Met is not just picking up the LOIC fodder, they're taking the Lultwitz and Anonyputz wagon to pieces, bit by bit. And to all those "concerned" in-duh-viduals bricking themselves over Davis being dragged down to London, what you should really be worrying about is the all-expenses holiday to a Virginian prison that will be waiting for him right after the Brit courts are through with him! And anyone stupid enough to be involved with him. Enjoy!

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Facepalm

HACK THE PLANET!!!

Seriously kids, grow up.

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