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back to article OCZ samples twin-core ARM SSD controller

OCZ is sampling a new flash controller that gives a picture of future solid state drives. The company bought Indilinx for its solid state drive (SSD) controller technology in March this year and has now unveiled the Indilinx Everest controller platform. It has a 6Gbit/s SATA III interface, a dual-core ARM processor and a number …

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Devil

Quote: The flash future looks bright

Quote: The flash future looks bright

Indeed, dazzling bright from the annihilation of the contents of my wallet meeting their anti-matter counterpart.

Striping 1TB flash drives? Even with the projected reductions in cost, I wish I had that budget...

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Bronze badge

Firmware

Hope they write some solid firmware before they release it.

I have nothing but trouble with an OCZ vertex 3 disc I bought a few months back. Since then numerous firmware updates have released, which have been impossible to install because of troubles with locked up drives and after their switch to a complete ISO not even been able to boot the firmware at all.

Every now and then, S.M.A.R.T. messages pop up saying there is some problem with the drive, only to disappear after refreshing the data. Now, these messages just keep coming, with an almost brand-new drive.

Their support sucks too, with employees mostly ignoring the support topics in their official forums.

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Ru
Meh

"a queue death of 32"

Call me paranoid, but I might wait for the point release of any model with this feature.

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Boffin

Dual Core?

I'm a total disc newb, but am I missing something?

What can a dual core do that a single core couldn't? One CPU for read, one for write/cache handling, maybe?

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Gold badge
Joke

Re: Dual Core?

I guess one of the main advantages has to be that OCZ's marketing types get to go: "Nyah, nyah, nyah, nyah, nyah, our controller's got more cores than your controller." at the opposition....

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Def
Bronze badge
Happy

Re: Dual Core

"What can a dual core do that a single core couldn't?"

Process twice as many requests per second. Newb. ;)

Seriously though, I'm sure there are far more things a modern drive controller is doing in the background other than simply processing read/write requests.

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Not so fast...

"This will provide sequential bandwidth up to 500MB/sec."

OCZ's current lineup, including the Vertex 3, will kick out 550MB/s with 500MB/s writes, so you'd expect their next gen hardware to be a bit quicker.

Admittedly, I seem to be one of the only happy Vertex 3 owners, as I've not had any problems and love the insane speed.

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Go

Indilinx

Indilinx is OCZ's "cheaper" controller; the one they put in their low-end drives. Thus, they're either moving up to replace SandForce in their high-end, or their bringing up the low-end to spec with their current high-end drives in preparation for even more next-gen SandForce controllers.

Either way, should make acquiring a 120GB boot/progs drive a bit lighter on the wallet.

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Re: Dual core?

On-the-fly data compression and advanced wear-leveling, I'd expect. Some kind of failure prediction would be nice too, but I doubt there's much that can be done there.

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Until consumer grade SSDs become reliable, count me out

Speed is nice but not at the risk of lost data from SSDs that have firmware issues. Intel, Corsair and OCZ have all had SSD issues to date. Not ready for prime time pretty much sums up the current consumer grade SSDs IMO.

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Silver badge

Drives that fail are never a good thing of course

but I have a few SSD's and none of them are used for data storage.

The price is prohibitive and most data hardly ever gets a read/write so there is not much lost performance wise.

Rather, I use SSD's for OS and application files to give a huge performance boost and keep the actual precious data bits on (more than one) old fashioned hard disks.

But maybe that's just me. As always YMMV

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Silver badge

GREAT!

Cheaper faster drives! I don't even care about reliability or size. It's really a shame they don't start pushing the full-duplex nature of SAS over SATA though.

Mine's the one with a hybrid array in the pocket.

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Silver badge

3 bits per cell an "enticing feature"?

Bits per cell is one area where more is less.

The more bits you stuff into a cell, the less margin to distinguish the bits. That reduces reliability and also makes writing and reading slower.

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