back to article Chinese lecturer demands his students acquire iPads

A Chinese lecturer has raised a storm by demanding students get an iPad, and that anyone unable to raise the funds over the summer shouldn't bother studying the financial industry. Liang Zhenyu teaches at the Shanghai Maritime University and sent out a tweet (over the Weibo service) explaining that he would be using an iPad for …

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What's the equivalent

of a P45 in China. Is there an app for that?

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Big Brother

Re: What's the equivalent of a P45 in China.

The 'AK47', I believe.

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FAIL

Re

""[The] iPad is not an innovation, it's revolution ... without it the teaching process will be paralyzed.""

Yep. No one has been taught anything or learned anything for the last million years. All hail Stevey J for making learning possible.

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Press-ups are OK now?

I do recall one lecturer getting the sack for doing pressups, but there was a teenaged student underneath him at the time...

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No

You're confusing press-ups with horizontal-jogging.

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Childcatcher

Business Attire

He may be enraptured with Mr Jobs iPad but not with his dress sense. Has he been watching too much of The Apprentice or Wall Street?

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Facepalm

Sadly he is right

Employment in financial services does require a complete submission of substance to perception so you may as well start early

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Not So Sad

There is a reason why financial services want everyone on the up and up. They are playing with other people's money and no one wants someone dressed like a developer playing with their money. Would you trust your money and your families future to a neckbeard dressed in a Star Wars T-shirt and combat boots?

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FAIL

No, but

I wouldn't trust it to some jumped up twat in a suit either.

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@Solomon Grundy

I may be wrong, but I think the useless pricks who fucked our economy wore nice, smart, suits. If you trust someone because of the way they're dressed you're a moron.

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Given their respective track records?

Did the developer have anything to do with Vista? Yes? Ok, give me a minute, I'm still trying to decide.

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ambiguity

I think its relevant to point out that two other purveyors of sharp suits and light make up are recruitment consultants and estate agents.

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Mushroom

Re: Not So Sad...

Wait, you have to wear a Star Wars t-shirt to be a developer? Wow! I've been cranking out everything from device drivers to web-apps over the last decade and I don't even own one!

Can we return the Geek Stereotype to American Highschools where it belongs, please?

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Pirate

Important to dress in suits

It is really important that we insist the w^H bankers wear suits.

That means when the lynching starts we will be able to spot them quickly.

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Unhappy

To quote Frank Turner

'And for every teenage tracksuit mugger

There's a guy in a suit who wouldn't lift a finger for anybody else.'

Dress sense says NOTHING about a person whatsoever. I have this argument regularly with a friend who wants me to join his golf club. I tell him until they relax all the Victorian era rules about what you can and cannot wear both in the club and on the course, and when women are allowed equal status* then there is no way I am joining.

He argues that it keeps the riff-raff out and I point out to him that that is the kind of snobbery that I am not willing to put up with. I have met far more people with sharp suits and Audis or Beemers that are complete and utter twats that I wouldn't spend 5 minutes with than I have your everyday nobody who shops at Primark and drives an Astra who tend to be decent people.

But if a sharp suit and a nice car are all it takes for you to trust somebody with your money, I have both so could I interest you in this once in a lifetime investment opportunity......

*The ladies have a room in the clubhouse with times that they are and are not allowed to be there along with times when they are not allowed to play on the course. Totally ridiculous

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Anonymous Coward

To all dissing Solomon Grundy

Ok, so noone would trust someone in a suit either. But that's not the point: if a finance advisor wore a suit (ok, granted) AND (wait for it) also had an iPad, now that's a completely different matter, then surely you'd trust him/her.

If you not agree with that, you have no necessarity be my course.

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FAIL

You sound like my mother

Scruffy sods wearing a towel and sandals - like that Jesus or Buddha bloke - clearly shouldn't be trusted.

Obviously the Third Reich with their natty Hugo Boss uniforms are very trustworthy.

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Very clever Bullseyed.

What do bankers/traders* really wear then?

(*Because, by definition, whoever fucked up the economy was a "banker" or "trader" [or whatever money-movers call themselves] -- even if it wasn't the bunch who were pointed at.)

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Black Helicopters

Oops

My comment was supposed to be about customer perception, I really didn't mean to get everyone so worked up.

I agree that the clothes don't make the person but consider this. If banks didn't have a dress code and operated like they do now (basically all providing the same services at similar costs) would you pick the bank with the staff in street dress or the bank with the well dressed staff?

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WTF?

Hey,

OMG is that why i'm poor? I thought the army boots were great.

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Paris Hilton

@Cameron Colley

>> If you trust someone because of the way they're dressed you're a moron.

True. But, OTOH, it might just make sense to mistrust someone because of the way they're dressed. Which is possibly what Mr. Grundy had in mind.

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no need..

eaasy to spot when a abanker is lying, just like politicions, their lips move

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depends

is aforesaid neckbeard named wosniac or gates.... AFAIK sugar and sinclair always wore suits.

ai rest my case m'lud

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Hmm

So if he's late, he wastes even more time in a pointless 'punishment' that seems to me to be more like dick waving.

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F.A.O Apple fanbois in this thread

See the guy in the article? That's your new benchmark.

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duuno about benchmark

'never wears a sweater to work'

not even a turtleneck???

fail!

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Gimp

A fanbuoy icon is mandatory

"[The] iPad is not an innovation, it's revolution ... without it the teaching process will be paralyzed."

Clearly he's not necessary to be anyone's teacher.

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Coat

Teaching

Who'd want to learn finances from a guy who supports giving out shovel loads of cash for horridly overpriced devices? Sounds like the same teacher the US Gov't had when they drafted the bailouts....

(Don't believe me on "overpriced"? Just look at their operating costs and profit margins)

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Anonymous Coward

In other news...

The organ transplant market plummeted recently due to an influx of "around $615" kidneys.

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You don't need all your organs to work in financial services

In fact some of them might be a disadvantage

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Coat

Finances

The most I had to get at university was the textbook (which happened to be co-authored by the lecturer....).

All other academic materials were platform agnostic, so could be opened with Windows/Linux/Macs (and no doubt new-fangled iTabloids).

Maybe they could get one from one of the fake apple shops?

To say that a student who cannot afford an overpriced tablet computer, and in effect ensuring that only the upper-middle/upper classes can study his course wouldn't happen in the UK surely, where lower and lower-middle classes can afford higher education? hmmm Actually... I'll get my coat....

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Anonymous Coward

Yeah, we had to get the book(s) too...

... but the 'platform' was paper and a ball point pen.

(The parents of today's fanbois used fountain pens or felt tip pens).

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platform agnostic...

wish my daughter's software courses were platform agnostic... sadly, as the college she attends sucks the Microsoft tit, all software courses use their development tools etc. and insist on her laptop being capable of running access etc. just to do the programming assignments... Tony Blair has got a lot to answer for... that shady deal where Bill Gates got a knighthood and all public sectors getting a big discount on going fully Microsoft was a serious setback to open source in this country...

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Anonymous Coward

The university I'm at is similar...

...however after a few words in the right ears, course materials suddenly started being put up on the Intranet as PDF or similar rather than DOCX. Not a massive improvement, but it means you can do the course without ever touching Microsoft Office if you don't want to.

Try seeing if there's any other students interested in making the course a little more platform-agnostic. Either with the formats they send assignments out in, or the tools they'll permit you to use. For instance, do you REALLY need to use Microsoft Expression Web to make a web page? Especially when it's a nothing in the industry compared with, say, Dreamweaver? Or even a half-decent syntax-highlighting text editor.

Believe it or not, professors will listen to their students sometimes! Be polite, don't be demanding, and see how far you get.

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Anonymous Coward

platdorm agnostic

I don't know when this stopped happening, but my software engineering course was pretty platform agnostic... in that you didn't *have* to get anything. if you wanted to use a computer, you went to a university computer cluster and used theirs. If you needed to do any development, you went to the 24/7 computer labs and used the stuff in there. They were even windows/linux dual boot dev boxes.

Having your own computer was handy, but not a requirement. You didn't even need to buy the course textbooks if you didn't want to, as the library stocked a good number of each of them.

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Platform agnostic

Heh.

Yes, the uni I'm at has quite excellent computing facilities and a lab dedicated entirely to the games course that I'm on. Playstation dev kits look teh sexay. Not 24/7 but close enough.

Unfortunately I'm here and the computers are there. The terminal server and RDP works but it's not really suitable for trying to chunk lots of images over a broadband connection. It's just nice to be able to read notes and write up essays and reports using whatever I have to hand, rather than having to buy overpriced word processors or bloat my home computer up with gigabytes of shite from the MSDNAA that suddenly becomes illegal the moment I leave the course.

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Anonymous Coward

Those who can't, teach.

"Poverty or rich doesn’t reflect on your family background, but reflected on your ability.”"

Which obviously explains why this guy it a teacher rather than running his own successful business.

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and those who are *completely* useless

work in HR and pass judgement on people who *can* do things!

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Really?

To say that the only reason people teach is because they can't succeed in business is silly. I've never heard that from someone who is even marginally successful. Those who can't 'do' work in the not-for-profit sector you child.

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Anonymous Coward

Not so, Mr G.

I've worked with some extremely capable, professional and dedicated people in the not-for-profit sector. I think you'll find that the public sector, primarily civil service and local government, is where the more challenged folks end up.

Anon simply because. :P

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Prick

Forget the iPad, it's the suit wearing rubbish I still dislike most, mainly because I have to wear one for an interview today. It's absolutely shocking that in the modern world interview situation idiots can be judged positively for their smart appearance while geniuses ignored because they turn up in comfortable clothes.

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I don't wear suits to interviews

Just smart casual attire. I don't think I'd wear a monkey suit for a programming position unless that's the dress code policy for the place. As far as I know it hasn't hurt any of my employment prospects.

Think of it like a first date. Just because you feel more comfortable being a slob doesn't mean you shouldn't try and make a good first impression.

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Happy

Yeah well that's the way it is for the moment.

Whenever I read something like this I am reminded of a comment by record producer Chris Kimsey when asked how to get into the recording industry, "Say you'll do anything in the studio, sweep up, make tea, etc, oh and always, always wear a suit to the interview! Steal one or wear youR Dad's, whatever. You may never wear one again in your life, dress like you slept the same clothes for a week all the time but wearing a suit to be a tea-boy shows you're willing to put yourself out to get that on that ladder and get the job you really, really want in the studio.".

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FAIL

I wouldn't hire you either!

Whilst I agree the Chinese bloke is a nutter, I think you may soon be destined for receive a life-lesson in how society works.

I wouldn't hire any idiot - or give additional plus points - solely because he happened to be wearing a suit. My job as an interviewer is to reject idiots and identify stars by careful questioning.

However, I also wouldn't hire anyone who thought they were too good/clever/"modern" to conform to the dress-standards that prevail in my industry and/or showed complete disrespect to their interviewer by turning up in "something comfortable". Why any firm would wish to hire such an arrogant social misfit is beyond me!

You aren't going down the pub with your mates - dress appropriately to the situation!

Good luck in the interview BTW.

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Flame

Rules

Like it or not, the rules of interviews currently expect all candidates to wear a suit.

If you can't attempt to meet the rules for the interview, what makes the interviewer think you will meet the rules of working for the company.

Play the game by the rules, or expect to be playing in the lower leagues for the rest of your life. Only once you're in the premiership can you wear your golden boots.

I know I'll get down votes, but then some people just won't accept reality.

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Thanks!

But you don't seem to have noticed - I did say in my post that I HAD put a suit on! I'm a realist about it, I was just having a little grumble :-)

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Rules

All candidates to wear a suit? Not in every industry, or remotely so. I think that you will find that the more technical/specialised the field, the less of a dress code, let alone a formal one. We all tend to know each other anyway, so what would be the point.

By the way, the article is missing an apostrophe:

"an argument with which, sadly, its hard to find fault."

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Anonymous Coward

"Think of it like a first date."

It's going to be expensive, and you might get f***ed?

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