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back to article Rare video: Moon flashing in front of giant's face

Boffins at the European Space Agency are hugging themselves gleefully after capturing a dramatic vid from a space probe in orbit above Mars which shows the Martian moon Phobos zooming across the backdrop provided by gigantic Jupiter. As readers will appreciate, the vid isn't all that stunning in and of itself: but we're …

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why

Why the comedy pauses? Were four of those 104 frames duplicated in their video editing software?

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Looks pretty stunning to me

You must be getting jaded :)

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Trollface

I was waiting for the stone to transform into monorail cat...

Sadly, no

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Black Helicopters

But where's the sound?

Guys... it's got no sound... must be a fake.

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Dude, photoshopped

You should totally hear the whooshing sound of a moon passing merely 10000km away. And Zarathustra, you should hear Zarathustra, too.

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Joke

And all only 6000 years old

*snigger*

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Pahh!

I played much more realistic versions of asteroids years ago, with better animation.

Having the spaceship in the middle being circular means the player can't tell which way he's facing - pretty poorly thought out that.

But worse is that the collision engine doesn't look like it's working: the spaceship didn't go bang.

1 out of 10 - rubbish. wouldn't buy it.

:)

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Where were the Leather Goddesses?

Oh, for the days of 8-bit probes...

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Boffin

Amazing

What amazes me is that someone is sitting there working out all these orientations so they know which ones to film. Or is it all computers these days?

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Terminator

We're all computers

You're the last one left...

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Flame

To defiler

Ahem, you forgot me, and you'll pay for it hehe!

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Whoa. Suh-WEET.

What's even more compelling here is that from Mars, Jupiter is visible as an actual sphere in the sky, instead of something small, glinting and starlike, as it appears from here.

I remember an even better image -- from the Mars Global Surveyor, iirc -- showing Jupiter as seen from Martian orbit. It wasn't a time-lapse video, but was still even more amazing as it was in natural color, and Jupiter's atmospheric banding and Great Red Spot were clearly visible.

Also outstanding was a shot of the Trifid Nebula taken from Cassini; it was doing a camera calibration check prior to a flyby of one of Saturn's moons, focusing on a random patch of space, and whaddya know, there was the Trifid Nebula! Granted, it was in grayscale and at a resolution nearer to most early/mid 20th Century astrophotography, but, still... a clear shot of the Trifid taken from a probe orbiting Saturn. Man, that foto was made of awesome.

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Alien

Mr

"What's even more compelling here is that from Mars, Jupiter is visible as an actual sphere in the sky, instead of something small, glinting and starlike, as it appears from here."

Erm, maybe the camera has a telescopic lense? That's how we know about the Great Red Spot in the first place: telescopes.

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MGS telescopic lens?

I honestly don't recall exactly which of its lenses/cameras MGS used to get that Jupiter shot, other than that it wasn't anything especially "long" -- the MGS cameras, iirc, were designed more for looking at things slightly closer, like the surface of Mars, or the occasional shot of one of its moons near the limb, and even at their "telephoto" setting, weren't really "long" enough for distant astronomical photography, certainly not the same as the cameras aboard the HST.

Also iirc, it wasn't an especially magnified shot -- Jupiter was quite small in the overall image, but just large enough for atmospheric banding and coloration to be discernible when that part of the image was cropped and magnified. I'm taking a SWAG that Jupiter viewed from Earth orbit with the same lens/camera would still be rather twinkly-dot-like.

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