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back to article Oz paper in todger-based trivia quiz outrage

Oz's Canberra Times proved unusually entertaining last Wednesday when its 10-question "Trivia Quiz" offered readers the chance to brush up on their todger-related general knowledge. The first poser was: "Which private detective has been played by Richard Roundtree and Samuel L Jackson...?" Yup, you've got it. Try this: "What is …

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Megaphone

Think of the children!!!!

Please, think of the children

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Joke

lol just lol...

That sure beats just telling the boss he's a dick on your last day at work...

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WTF?

Hail the New Puritans

The Aussies will start putting skirts around table legs soon.

It was silly and a little juvenile, but frankly most of the people doing the quiz wouldn't have actually noticed the magic wand references.

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Jesus H Christ

Perhaps we should legislate that no-one is to have a sense of humour.

I thought that was pretty good - every single question/answer was valid, and not 'rude' in the slightest, and in combination, was quite amusing.

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All in the mind

This only works if you have a dirty mind (mine is absolutely filthy); so what does this tell you about the people who complained?

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Yag
Unhappy

Okay.

I guess my english skills are not that good, I didn't got it until I checked the ABC link...

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Peter?

I've never heard "Peter" used as a euphimism for the old pork sword before. Maybe it's an Aussie thing?

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Boffin

Re: Never heard Peter used...

As in Point Peter (or Percy) at the Porcelain.

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Not an Aussie

I'm a Pome, and I've certainly heard "Peter" used this way.

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Comments

There are some other good examples in the comments, including this one:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:JamesMayAutocar.jpg

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Pint

indeed

and I was sure there was more than one "cunt" in scunthorpe but the spelling doesnt lie.

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Coffee/keyboard

Excellent.

An old topic for humour, particularly in the IT field (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scunthorpe_problem), but I've never heard this version before.

Don't worry, my keyboard was knackered already.

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Thumb Up

Private Eye

You should see the crossword in Private Eye...

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And Pagemasters,,,,,,

Are the people who sub the Daily Telegraph these days as well.......

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Happy

Sneaking messages past the editors.

My personal favourite, the famous White Dwarf issue 77:

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_LSIlUCixAQ0/TIFtxtbDE7I/AAAAAAAABcU/nGevmxQO7R4/s1600/wd77contents.jpg

If you've not seen it before, it's the sub-headings for each item in the content list that are important here....

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WTF?

re: Sneaking messages past the editors.

Hardly sneaking it past, it was the editor who did it!

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Anonymous Coward

took me a while to spot it was an acrostic

How the hell did anyone notice that originally?

on other note, one famously prudish magazine editor back whenever wouldn't allow any dodginess and caught all attempts at putting one by (became a sport to try), until someone managed with something about a newlfangled ball-bearing mousetrap. Illustrated over the page as having four legs and going 'meow'.

Too good not to be apocryphal I guess.

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thanks for the memories

Been a long while since I saw that,

and many familiar names in there too including that of the "Life President of Eidos"

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Happy

Prior art?

I remember another, earlier version reported in Private Eye long ago. Sadly, though probably wisely, Private Eye's archives aren't searchable online. As I remember, it was a column of short articles in an English regional newspaper with the first letter of each article enlarged (not an uncommon newspaper style). Reading down the enlarged letters yielded "fuck you carter" or similar - I can't remember the actual name, but the Eye claimed it was an unpopular editor at that newspaper.

Disclaimer: Private Eye in its earlier days (before the editorship of Mr Ian Banana) was much funnier, much more anti-establishment and anarchic, but also much less likely to be a reliable source of information ("This story is too good to check" was an Eye-ism).

Tangentially, I'm reminded that one of the Zucker brothers' classic movies credited one "Chuck U Farley" as an executive producer, or something.

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I felt a bit innocent.

Until I realized that "What is the official currency of Vietnam?" was answered in my mind by "Ears."

Perhaps you had to have been there.

Or not.

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Joke

You should see what was for this week...

Who, with her husband Johnnie, was a famous TV chef in the 1950s & 60s?

Name the bass player in the Spencer Davis Group.

Which dam building rodent is a national symbol of Canada?

Who did Honor Blackman play in Goldfinger?

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Joke

Re: You should see what was for this week - compulsary response

All together now: "I hope all your doughnuts look like Fanny's"

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Happy

Something like this happened back in the '60's with a UK electronics magazine, ...

except it was an article on war surplus conversion of a radar unit which featured a 'horn' and a 'cavity', in the days before the commercial resale market developed and the magazine was distributed and when readers, at least those with dirty minds, realised it described the deflowering of a virgin all tangled up with words technicians commonly use there was absolute panic. One phrase that comes to mind was "blowing away the cobwebs before you start". A real collectors item.

Yes it was an April issue - which was hurriedly recalled, unsuccessfully.

As for the question: : "What is the official currency of Vietnam?" the answer is the DONG (pronounced DOM) and has a picture of Uncle Ho on everyone of the notes/bills. They start at VND200 and the largest is VND500,000. There are about 22,000 to the dollar. My morning Cafe sua nom (strong enough to melt a teaspoon) costs me VND5,000.

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Paris Hilton

Since "dong" is a little bit snigger-worthy...

Shouldn't the Vietnamese government use "đồng" instead? That's how it's actually spelled.

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Pint

sub-sub-text

Think there's any chance Pagemasters hired someone sympathetic to those chopped, and this was actually a most polite (and public) way of saying "up yours"?

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