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back to article Iomega Home Media Network Cloud Edition 1TB drive

I must confess that I do have have an extraordinary fondness for network attached storage. And when terms like ‘home media’ and ‘cloud edition’ appear on the box, then it certainly gets my attention. Iomega Home Media Network Hard Drive Cloud Edition 1TB Cloud cover: Iomega's Home Media Network drive So, while for you Iomega’ …

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*cough*

What sort of hard drive has it got inside?

What sort of noise does the fan make?

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FAIL

Why stop there...

I thought this was a tech site... what about how quick is a sustained data transfer. I've owned a few NAS boxes and some are dead slow and some are quick. A slow NAS is a fate worse than death when moving data around, how does this compare?

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What about transfer speeds?

I've got a NAS box from Xyzel which has a nice interface too, but unfortunately in practice it is absolutely unusable due to pathetic transfer speeds. It would be nice to know if this Iomega box would be any better.

I'm also not completely clear if the price quoted includes a drive or not.

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FAIL

Apparently titles are important after all

Quote "I'm also not completely clear if the price quoted includes a drive or not."

Clue is in the title -

Iomega Home Media Network Cloud Edition 1TB drive

You see where it says 1TB drive? That's where the clue is.

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Anonymous Coward

Bit overpriced, surely ...

I picked up a fairly plain Hitachi 1TB USB drive last year for £55 ... so this is £60 extra for a bit of software and a network card ?

Now if it was a 2x1TB setup with some inbuilt redundancy/crash protection, I might be interested.

Currently I'm dangling the 1TB drive of a Linux box, which is on the internet (if I need it), so acts as a cloud server anyway. My Linux experts tell me I can get another 1TB drive, and just reconfigure to act as a 2-way redundant setup .....

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Hate to say this

But the difference between an external USB drive adn a NAS is more than a bit of software and a network card.

What for example would the 'bit of software' run on ?

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Alert

Linux?

When you say it supports Linux, could you elaborate please? I have an earlier 500GB version and, whilst it's certainly possible to make it play with Ubuntu, it's a bit of a PITA, due to the way in which it manages users between itself and clients. There was certainly no client software available for Linux in the way there is for Windows and Mac. This entails, at the very least, a knowledge of using chmod as root and a passing acquaintance with the mount command / fstab. All rather disappointing given that the box itself is linux-based. I do have various apps - Thunderbird, Firefox, Tomboy, even Dropbox after a struggle - successfully sharing data on the drive from a variety of Ubuntu, XP and Win7 boxes, but most people would have given up with most of those before getting them working.

@1st AC: @Alex Walsh is referring to the unfortunately accurate reputation these Iomega drives have for making a hell of a racket.

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WTF?

One disk = useless

I can't see the point in buying or reviewing any of these gadgets at all which have only one disk in them. Hard disks die. When this one dies, you lose all the data on it. Why would you _ever_ set up any kind of large important data store without some kind of redundancy?

I set up my own three-drive RAID-5 1TB array a couple of years ago, and I've already replaced every drive in the original configuration; I would've lost all that data three times over if I'd relied on single drives.

As Dan of Dan's Data says, data you only have one copy of is data you don't mind losing.

(Backing up the data separately is also a good idea, of course, but it actually gets practically tricky to deal with backing up that kind of quantity of data.)

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Not sure this is the product you mean to rant at.

This is a device to be used to back up a home computer and store a little media -- so if it dies either you'll have the original PC or the media will be in some way retrievable (depending on its copyright status and how it got onto the disc in the first place).

It's also supposed to be "cloud" so your photographs, for example, will be stored in one or more "clouds" as well as being on the device.

Oh, and as to RAID5 -- my current main home partition is on one but I'm not sure why since

I worked out that there's a good chance that if a drive fails one of the others in the pack could fail not long after and the stress of rebuilding a RAID could be just the trigger.

I don't think any devices of the type reviewed here are "backup" devices -- they're convenient ways of sharing data. All serious backups are off-site.

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NFS ?

Does the box support NFS (v3 or better ?)

If so, it's a win, if not, nah .. cannot be bothered.

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Eugh Cloud Really?

So anything attached to the internet is now a "Cloud" machine is it?

I really wish this marketing hype would go away. It is a server attached to a network. Cloud services are supposed to be resilient (this is not) and several other things that differentiate it from plain old "server attached to internet."

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