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back to article Coder Android tablet love on (a bit of a) wane

Developer interest in Android phones and tablets is on the wane – at least a bit – according to a new study. The latest mobile-developer survey from IDC and Appcelerator – the Silicon Valley outfit whose Titanium kit lets coders build native mobile apps with traditional web tools – indicates that during the first quarter, …

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Flame

Hardly surprising

As Android users (according to the studies) don't actually buy apps very much (certainly compared to users of iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch). The number of units sold isn't what developers are interested in, they are interested in £'s spent - there Android lags.

I could characterise it thus: "People who buy Android devices are too 'frugal' to buy iOS devices". Hardly rich pickings for developers is it?

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Bronze badge

or, put another way...

"People who buy iPhones have more money than sense and will buy anything with an i in front of it". Rich pickings for developers.

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FAIL

Yawn

>>> "People who buy iPhones have more money than sense and will buy anything with an i in front of it". Rich pickings for developers.

Do you Apple trolls search for "iOS" so you can make these boring posts? Are you incapable of any kind of reasoned argument based on facts and knowledge rather than insults?

Don't answer that, your pathetic post speaks for you.

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IT Angle

Ring tones

Not much of a difference to ring tones then? Remember being bombarded with 'polyphonic ring-tone' adverts?

World + dog produced ring tones for a quick cash grab and many found out it didn't really pay that much or that the novelty value had tailed off.

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Joke

And the solution to all this fragmentation?

Use Appcelerators Titanium Framework, code in one languag...... <blah> <blah> <blah> reduce ttm <blah> <blah> <blah>...

Amazing!

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Bronze badge

Do I understand correctly,

Android phones and devices can't charge on your phone bill for app purchases - you have to use a credit card?

That, and multiple free apps, discourages a customer from paying for other programs. You can have quite a lot of fun with an Android device without paying for it.

There are, however, advertising-sponsored apps, but I don't think that a lot of money is made that way.

On the other hand, free apps - and adware apps - are liable to be of a lesser standard than apps with a price tag.

And the price tag is only a couple of bucks anyway.

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Re: Do I understand correctly,

>> Android phones and devices can't charge on your phone bill for app purchases - you have to use a credit card? That, and multiple free apps, discourages a customer from paying for other programs.

I can't really see your point, since this is the same in iOS, where developers are ostensibly rolling in the money.

-dZ.

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Not a great surprise

I think the general fiasco around the release of android tablets with manufacturers not being up front about when they will be released has harmed developer interest in the short term (I know that's the case for me) but once we start to see wide scale availability I'm sure things will return to growth.

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Re: Not a great surprise

I work for as a developer, along with a team of 30 or 40 others. During the past year or so there's been a lot among my colleagues on the subject of Android development. In fact, many started dabbling with the SDK as soon as it became available. You could almost hear the derision in their comments when they compared the "openness" of Android vs. the "locked-in" of Apple's products.

Now, most of them talk about iOS development, and some have even placed their orders for iPads recently. When I asked them about their change of heart, the consensus seems to be that iOS is where the money is at, it is the "cool" platform to target, and apparently most importantly, the development tools seem to be more accessible, stable, and productive. Some have related horror stories of how they tried to fight with the tools just to get anything done; of constant crashes, unusual behaviour, and even stability and resource issues with the simulator.

I've not done any development for either platform, so I don't have first hand-knowledge of any of it. It'll be interesting to know their views on the platform in a few months.

-dZ.

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Law

SDK's

I've played with both (not professionally though) and both have benefits and drawbacks - don't recall hitting too many issues with either one really though, not enough to put me off a platform. This was about 2 years ago, not touched the latest versions.

At the time I was CS .NET developer and found Android the easier one to develop for having prior experience in Java - but I was also lusting after an Android phone having become a little bored with my iPhone at the time so maybe that was a factor.

In hindsight, I think XCode had a more professional feel to it than the Eclipse setup - it seemed cleaner, less buggy and just simpler. I had used Eclipse before though for some embedded development and Java dev, and apart from it being a little clunky and a little too "javary", it's a really nice IDE and I'm sure it's been improved since then. Are there still pre-configured VMWare images for the verious Android DKs?

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Second Angle

There's another way to read the results, since the company that did the survey is selling cross-platform tools. Perhaps they're seeing a downtick in interest in Android due to developers giving up on cross-platform and just coding for Android directly. Android is starting to pass everyone in market share, it could very much be that giving up on the other platforms.

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Paris Hilton

Condensed version of article is ...

freetards don't part with their money, ever! they expect everything to be free or go to hell...

you will build your entire system on open freetard source, you must lay in that bed now!

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Thumb Down

Freetards

beer, speech etc

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