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back to article THQ brings the uDraw GameTablet to Blighty

Today sees the UK launch of THQ's uDraw GameTablet, a fresh way for kids and families to interact with their Nintendo Wii console. I took a trip down to the uDraw showcase event in London this week to catch up with the developers, the THQ team and special guest star Korky Paul, the children's book author and illustrator, to see …

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No surprises in the venues...

I see the furthest north THQ get is Leeds/Manchester.

Hardly UK wide coverage, I would have expected Edinburgh/Glasgow for the Jocks and the Metrocentre for us Geordies.

I'd have probably taken the little-un to have a look given it's his birthday soon, but I guess it's back to Lego and Scalextric.

Technical Lego is suitable for a five year old right?

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Technical Lego is suitable for a five year old right?

It will have to be: they don't make meccano any more.

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Sounds interesting

Could be very interesting indeed, and it's not like this type of gameplay device is unpopular, judging by the performance of the DS. The two things I find surprising about this are:

1) that it took this long after the release of the DS for this thing to come to the Wii, and

2) that it's a third-party accessory rather than a homegrown Nintendo part.

I'd say it's a bit late in the Wii's lifecycle to release something like this, but on the other hand I'm still getting loads of use out of mine and won't be getting rid of it any time soon so presumably THQ are satisfied that the platform will be the current Nintendo home console for at least another 12-24 months...

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To quote myself from an earlier discussion on Gamasutra...

"The uDraw is a simple drawing tablet which lets you export low-resolution images (576*396) and costs more than an equivalent PC tablet - on Amazon.com, PC tablets start from around £30 and generally come with an art package. They've sold 1.2 million units bundled with an art application; if vgchartz is to be believed, they've also sold 400,000 copies of Pictionary (a very well-established IP) and just 130,000 copies of Dood's Big Adventure.

In other words, people have picked it up to give their kids something to doodle on, and some have bought an established, popular party game to go with it. They haven't bought the only original IP which has been released and I'll be genuinely surprised if any further releases find significant success."

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