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back to article Oracle to float cloud-ready Java EE in 2013

The flavor of Java used to build application servers like IBM's WebSphere, Oracle's WebLogic, and Red Hat's JBoss is getting a two-stage retooling designed to float app severs to the cloud. Oracle is thrashing out a roadmap for the next versions of Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) that will add new web technologies such as …

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WTF?

Crickets chirping

...Clouds drifting...

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Anonymous Coward

Need to expand San Francisco

it's just not big enough to have Oracle Open World, Oracle Develop and JavaOne going simultaneously

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Most needed feature - IMO

Us java people really really really need the virtual machine to recognise Spring and Hibernate libraries and delete them - possibly also smacking in the face those who even just try to use them.

An endless number of classes and interfaces just to perform a sql query, plus having to guess which configuration files are creating the mile long stack trace is not normal.

Please

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Anonymous Coward

MapReduce -isn't that Apache code they need there?

The defacto standard for MapReduce code in the Java world is Apache Hadoop and its layers on top. We can pretty much take is as a given that the ASF aren't going to work with Oracle on Java EE compatibility. Instead Oracle/IBM are going to have to deal with the problem themselves and deal with the fact that it is not Apache's problem if changes break Java EE compatibility.

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Coat

And now the weather

Little sun today, with a new bank of clouds moving in from the east and a high chance of buzzword showers later. A thick layer of marketing is expected to form overnight, persisting late into the day and reducing visibility to little more than six months, so little chance of forward plans making much sense. Frequent outbursts of hot air are expected, especially around Cupertino and Mountain View in the wake of a sales high in the region. In the long term forecast, significant chilling effects expected as a front of patent lawyers is once again making its way across the atlantic.

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Thumb Up

Like Overseer's "Heligoland"

Good stuff.

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Anonymous Coward

As an owner of the original WEBMASTER poster

I have to say, they've come a long way, but their way is currently pissing a lot of people off. that tends to drive them to alternatives. as the alternatives dry up, we are headed for something, I don't know what.

JAVA is uninstalled now.

Your next move?

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Grenade

Sod JavaOne

I'm going to Devoxx instead :D

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Boffin

RE: Most needed feature - IMO #

For simple CRUD, hibernate is a lot more convenient and easier to maintain than raw SQL any day of the week, and also you can just use JPA annotations these days to get rid of most configuration files if you find that more elegant. Spring is about the best thing that's ever happened to enterprise Java since sliced bread (and EJB was a steaming pile of sh*t until very recently), so not really sure where you're coming from there.

if you're worried about figuring out where something's defined in either of these frameworks, you need to start using a decent IDE (certainly IntelliJ solves all such issues and I believe Eclipse has a good spring plugin as well). Also, if you want to see hibernate and spring done with zero config, take a look at Grails and prepare to be blown away.

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