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back to article Eight years for ID fraudster

An identity thief who fraudulently claimed more than £1.3m in tax credits under false names has been imprisoned for eight-and-a-half years. Olaide (John) Taiwo, 35, a security guard from Camberwell, South East London, who was earlier found guilty of conspiracy to commit tax credit fraud and acquiring criminal property, was …

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Silver badge

Damn!

I read that hoping Blunkett had finally been put away.

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Coffee/keyboard

YOMANK

USB one pls.

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Coat

George Agdgdgwngo

Good afternoon sir, I am calling to let you know that there is a pigeon in your bank account....

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Makes a change from reading about Nigerian scammers. .

Oh, wait a minute.....

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WTF?

Four years!!!

Jesus Christ, They got away with it for four years. What kind of operation are we running that has such lax fraud checking facilities. Let's put money on the government not being able to recover anything like the full amount. Odds are that it is already overseas.

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Unhappy

And the missing questions

Are the people who should of received these benifits going to be contacted and told they:

a) are entitled to them

b) can get them backdated

Oh thought not.

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g e
Silver badge

From the desk of Olajumoke Ademuyiwa

Dear trusted friend,

We are being experiencing legal troubles in sending your $4,000,000 remunerations to your banking address.

Please send fraud lawyers as urgency to expedite your swift payments

Trust in God we shall prevail

Your trusted friends

Olaide Taiwo and Olajumoke Ademuyiwa

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Bronze badge
FAIL

How comes...

Honest people have so much difficulty even opening bank accounts (especially if they've been hit by financial downturn and had some cashflow hiccups) yet all these criminals seem to be able to get as many accounts as they want at a drop of a hat?

It's quite clear that being suitable for a bank account goes no further than 'can we make some money out of this', whether legitimate or not they don't care. No better than those doing the thieving really.

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Unhappy

Abacus at the ready

"Investigators also seized £70,000 as suspected proceeds of crime"

I'm just wondering how much the court case will cost and also what the cost of imprisoning them for 8.5 years will be. Bet it's more than 70 grand.

Any odds on recovering the other 1.2 million? Anyone?

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Anonymous Coward

419

"Any odds on recovering the other 1.2 million? Anyone?"

Maybe they got suckered by a load of 419 scam emails, and it's all gone.?

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Gold badge
Thumb Down

Not a bad return

£1300000 pilfered but £70000 lost in the raid.

Over a course of 4 years, plus 3 for the investigation, plus 8 years inside (actually only 4 tops)

Gives a total of:

£1230000

/ 11 years

~£111k a year. (plus free food and lodgings while inside.)

I'm in the wrong job.

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Silver badge
FAIL

"The sentences given will be a warning...

"... to anyone considering committing this type of fraud"

Does *anyone* really believe this sort of bollocks?

People commit this sort of fraud because they think they can get away with it, if they didn't, they wouldn't do it. They don't give a toss about any potential sentence they may get.

But, as usual, the people who *actually* get away scot free are the ones who had such lax security measures in place that the fraud could happen in the first place!

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Happy

Guilty as charged

Thievin' while black ...

What's the tariff for GBH these days? 8 years?

I thought not

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Happy

If only ...

... they had stuck to hacking telephones for the News of the World they'd have been promoted.

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Money Owed

I hope the 300+ innocent people who had their tax credits redirected got back paid and not just forgotten about. These two were taking money entitled to them !

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Bronze badge

But

I presume the scam was in finding those entitled and applying for that money without those entitled ever knowing.

If innocent people don't claim what they are entitled to then (although not my view) it's tough-titty; they'd lost their money no matter who ended up with it, treasury or criminal.

The bigger crime is the government's failure to ensure that people entitled do get what they are entitled to automatically. They know exactly what everyone honest earns but keep schtum when there's money they could claim; a different story when it's people who owe them tax etc.

But who expects the government to actually serve the people rather than itself?

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Unhappy

Money Laundering Systems Working?

So HMRC caught up with them.

All the fancy bank money laundering systems, mandated by the government, didn't spot £1.3m proceeds of crime being processed.

Kind of demonstrates how useful they are

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