Feeds

back to article Facebook defends security strategy

Facebook has defended its record in thwarting rogue applications and other security in the face of criticism from security firms that it ought to adopt tighter application controls. The dominant social network disputes findings from a threat report by UK-based net security firm Sophos, released earlier this week, that spam, …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
WTF?

Facebook has a security strategy?

Huh. Who knew?

5
0
Flame

There is no defense

Facebook is outright EVIL and only cares about selling your info for profit.

The BS is in the news EVERY DAY.

5
0
Silver badge
Flame

Eh?

How is this any different from the emails that creep through the spam filter?

The ones that invite you to click on alink or do a survey or remind you you have an 'overdue payment'?

Spam is spam is nothing else - how that is supposed to make Facebook 'evil' is just people farting in the bath to enjoy thier own smell.

Also -- I don't remember Facebook being the only site that passes on info.

If any attacks are to be made then make it fair and don't just go for the knee-jerk like the rest of the flock.

'Oh, Facebook is V bad, they will rip your liver out and sell it to the Koreans while you are still sat at home cleaning up ypur profile'

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Of which

"...the 3.6 million people who have liked the Facebook Security Page, hundreds of thousands of which..." Not "whom". There ya go. Facebook actually thinks its users are things, products.

4
0
FAIL

Facebook scams

The Facebook app model is broken. Daily I see loads of posts that have been created from images and iframes causing users to unknowingly 'like' some spam page.

Getting app developers to sign up for a app key with a small fee and limiting the connections for a particular app key to a web server would limit the number of these apps and cost the spammers money as every time one of these pages is detected the developer account could be closed.

Of course, this might also limit the number of fb app developers.

I never allow access to any application that requests permission to post on my or my friends wall. The 'like' problem is more difficult to solve but it's not as if fb doesn't have the resources, my feeling is that facebook don't actually respect user privacy at all and the internal culture has evolved to allow an amount of collateral damage in terms of security breaches.

1
0
Happy

WHAT.....

...security strategy? Where?

1
2
JDX
Gold badge

hmm

>>Facebook said: "If your spam filter catches all the spam, does it matter that your filter caught 10 per cent more?"

Sure, who cares. Nobody has to pay for filtering all that spam... maybe they want to keep Google busy dealing with their mess?

>>The social networking site reckons less than three per cent of communications on Facebook are spam, compared to industry estimates that email spam makes up 90 per cent of all electronic messages

Oh come on, 99.9% of communication of FaceBook is dross anyway. The spam is probably more content-filled than the status messages about your cat.

3
1
Heart

Careful now

Loving the subtle Father Ted references!

1
0
Alert

FACEBOOK SECURITY? WHAT SECURITY? WHAT A JOKE!

Facebook security? What security? What a joke! Facebook does more to put users at risk for identity theft from hackers and viruses than any other site on the internet! They think nothing of infriging on a users personal information, which they intend to sell to the highest bidder.

Their latest privacy invasion to ask people for their home address, phone numbers, employment information and education in their profile is outrageous. The local news broadcasts in my area has warned people against giving out this information on the internet, and mention Facebook in particular. With this information, and your date of birth, also on your profile, a hacker or phisher can access your personal data and you can become the newest victim of identity theft. They also suggest that you should hide your date of birth, or at least the birth year because of this.

Another thing you should hide on you Facebook account is your email address. There was a recent news item about a hacker who used the email addresses from Facebook user accounts to break into the personal email accounts of those individuals and stalk them. How's that for scary?

Facebook has also road blocked users from accessing their accounts, or posting to groups unless they relinquish their credit card or cell/mobile phone number. Oddly enough, this started around the same time Target department stores started selling Facebook gift cards. The reason they want your cell phone is simple. While most people may not have a credit card, most everyone has a cell phone, which can be charged in lieu of a credit card.

To force people to give out personal financial data, or any personal information, on what is suppose to be a free site, is a major privacy concern. You have to wonder exactly who they are planning to share this information with, and how they intend to use it. Facebook does not communicate with users, the users are always the last ones to know what's going on, and usually find out the hard way, when the damage is done and it's too late. However, if someone's credit card or cell phone number reached the wrong hands this could have disastrous results, with unauthorized charges and/or indentity theft. It is alarming that Facebook is not concerned about this, and does nothing to protect users from hackers, phisers or viruses on their site.

There are Facebook groups that protest Facebook's request for credit card or mobile phone data, and many others that protest another brain storm by Facebook called Friend Finder. There is currently a class action law suit filed against Facebook because they used the names and profile photos/images of users in advertisements for Friend Finder without their consent, knowledge or authorization. By using this information, it is implying the individuals depicted in these ads are endorsing this Facebook application, which is not true. In many cases the people featured in the ads are unaware they are even on them. How do I know about this? Because I was recently contacted by a friend with a "screen shot" of a Friend Finder ad, and I was in it!

Facebook does not care about user privacy and does not take ANY security measures or precautions on their site. Facebook is not at all concerned about protecting users from hackers, viruses or phishers. All they are interested in are ways to siphon new personal information from users to sell to the highest bidder and make millions of dollars on advertising with. It's time legal and government authorities did something about it and put a stop to Facebook's infringement and abuse of private user data and information.

Facebook is a lot of fun, but everyone needs to use caution with their personal information to protect themselves. Facebook does not look out for you, or protect you. Their actions have proved it time and time again.

0
0
Bronze badge

3% FaceBook, 90% eMail spam?

Don't they have those numbers the wrong way around?

1
0
Alert

It's just crafty deliberate security leaks

I believe these security lapses are a deliberate way for facebook to sell data to those who want it. Sounds nuts, but when you have legal security clauses already in print when such things hit the wall, as was the case with the recent apps data mining hole, tell me these things aren't pre-orchestrated.

1
0
Silver badge
FAIL

"The scams take advantage of human stupidity"

Ahhhh. now there's ya problem.....

0
1
This topic is closed for new posts.