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back to article NASA nano-satellite belatedly ejects from orbiting mothership

NASA has announced that a small "nano-satellite" which was supposed to be released from a larger spacecraft in orbit on 6 December has finally separated from its mothership. The space agency is appealing for help from ham radio enthusiasts in picking up signals from the little NanoSail-D. NASA concept of the NanoSail-D with …

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Pint

Reminds me of...

Thermostellar Bomb #20 to Sgt. Pinback: "You are false data. Therefore I shall ignore you."

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Anonymous Coward

Dark Star

Let there be LIGHT...

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Silver badge

If only...

...they'd had the foresight to put a little Playmobilnaut aboard.

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Flame

@Mike Richards

That would mean a horrible, fiery death for the poor guy. Where the PARIS craft was released at near-zero velocity relative to the surrounding lack of air, satellites have considerable speed on re-entry already. And the sail would be insufficiently strong and large enough to act as a parachute, seeing as the whole point is to get the satellite to de-orbit and burn up instead of gently floating down into a Spanish tree.

I do wonder if a paper airplane released from, say, the ISS would stand a chance on re-entry, or rather, what size, shape and weight would keep the dissipation over time of its kinetic energy (once it starts to encounter perceptible drag from the atmosphere) low enough to not combust or disintegrate.

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Anonymous Coward

Duck!

I saw a strange light in the sky at around 6.10 pm on Tuesday.

Looked like a green meteor heading down at a 45 degree angle right to left, parallel to the long road leading from St Peter Port to St Sampsons.

any ideas?

AC, because it might have been a classified satellite deorbiting or something...

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Troll

Occam's Razor

Why not suppose that it was a green meteor? I've seen several and I'm not a habitual stargazer.

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The Space Chronometer was a much better idea

Considering that, with the help of Dr. Alan Jefferson, I became one of the "Honourable Mentions" for the Tour Eiffel de la Space Competition, in 1986, celebrating the Centenary of the design and construction of the Eiffel Tower, with our entry for The Space Chronometer; an hour minute and second hand in space to give Greenwich Mean Time to all humanity; one might be forgiven for asking why has it taken so long to try out such structures? And such a feeble one at that....

Our own was for three separate hands, hour, minute and second; 9Km, 6Km and 3Km in length, a control module at the centre of each hand and the same length cable, 9Km, 6Km, and 3Km to the other end to balance the rotation with each hand having a satellite at each end to drive their rotation. The rotation holding the hands out straight with the design being limited by the once every 60 seconds rotation of the 3Km long second hand on one side and the 3Km long cable balancing on the other, rotating around the central control module. Each hand a quite separate entity, each one behind the other to form a single clock face.

The whole providing an 18Km diameter "Clock in Space".

http://www.jstor.org/pss/1575232

Enjoy.

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IT Angle

Looks like something a child made...

It appears to be made from a few metal poles and stretched bin bags from your photo, is that right?

Is NASA a recession victim aswell?

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Anonymous Coward

The first 13 bytes

are NanoSailD.org 0101C8212B000100000D008A800282023FA201C8A101000000

Scifi never mentions this but lots of space beacons start with a URL which is very unfair on people trying to decode our artefacts.. l..e..m..o..n..p..a..r..t

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