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back to article ASSANGE GRANTED BAIL

WikiLeaks supremo Julian Assange was granted bail on appeal by a London court this afternoon. After six days in jail he will be released with conditions, including a £240,000 surety. The next hearing in Sweden's attempt to extradite him in relation to alleged sex crimes against two women was scheduled for 11 January. However, …

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Troll

If I were Colonel Gadaffi...

...I'd offer Assange political asylum.

Or has Gadaffi stopped with his policy of "let's piss off the Americans just for shits and giggles"?

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Woop woop

the internet lives to fight another day.

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Only seems fair

He wasn't going to run anywhere was he? hope he gets a fair and just trial to the fullest extent of the law. Judges should stop tweeting and twating so immature

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RE: The main man

Well as a man more recognisable than Osama Bin Laden, you would think so.

America must really be scared to be going this far.

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Actually ....

He skipped out of Sweden when he was meant to be attending for questioning, so I do expect a challenge to his bail.

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FAIL

You couldn't possibly be more wrong

Assange was questioned by the Swedes earlier in the year and given permission to leave Sweden by the judge.

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Stop

@Dapprman

Erm, no he didn't. A Swedish court gave him *permission* to leave the country in early November IIRC.

It's also worth noting that he was arrested in the UK *by appointment*, i.e. he handed himself in voluntarily. Not exactly the behaviour of a man wishing to skip town, and most likely the reason for his bond being set.

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You are correct Mahatma,

. . . he couldn't possibly be more wrong.

You have to wonder whether this is a deliberate attempt to troll or even worse, that this person can be so terribly ill informed yet still feel compelled to arrogantly entitle his post with "Actually".

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g e
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"hope he gets a fair and just trial"

Get the hell out of the UK then.

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RE: g e

He has a much greater chance of a fair trial in the UK than in the USA or Sweden.

His extradition can be blocked in the UK if they determine he's wanted for political reasons. Which he is.

He can get away scot free of charges in Sweden and still have to face charges in USA.

The USA will have him executed or imprisoned for 50+ years.

Do you really see him facing a worse punishment in the UK "g e" or do you, as i suspect, not know what you're talking about?

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Anonymous Coward

No need to shout

No need to shout

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Anonymous Coward

No need to repeat yourself

No need to repeat yourself.

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Anonymous Coward

Swedish prosecutors challenging bail

They've got two hours to lodge an appeal, according to the guardian

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2 days

Apparently to the BBC and this seems more likely.

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Nice to see

that he's being treated as a regular person.

Now if we can be certain that US snatch squads don't have access to his locator tag transponder signature....

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RE: Nice to see

<Yawn> Oh, is that the I-see-a-conspiracy-behind-every-tree crowd flip-flopping again? First you lot claim that the nasty old Gov is banging him up so they can refuse him bail, stick him in solitary and hand him over to the Yanks at the drop of a hat. Then, when Assange gets bail, you immediately flip again and start saying it's only so the dreaded boogermen-assassins of the CIA can nail him in public! Please, just go lay down in a quiet, dark room for a while.

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Joke

Yesh!

cos everyone knows a Conspiricy theary isnt worth anything unless it involves the vatican!

:-)

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Sir

@Matt Bryant

are you saying that the CIA don't engange in such tactics?

The original poster may well be barking up the wrong tree, but you are definitely wrong if you think that they don't.

The US has significantly failed in their PR damage limitations exercises, in fact they seem to be making things worse for themselves (probably as a result of arrogance one assumes).

What makes you think that someone twat won't just say..

'fuck it, we're in it up to our necks, we might as well get our hands on the little bastard'

and order a black-op.

Oh, that's right, black-ops only exist in movies. <YAAAAAAAAAAAWWWWWWWWWWWN>

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Anonymous Coward

"US snatch squads"

I think I saw that film once. It was a bit pervy.

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A small step...for now

Its unreal that this situation has even developed in the UK. There can be no doubt this is political......

At least he is out for Christmas

:)

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Black Helicopters

Deals within deals....

What are the chances they are offering to drop the McKinnon request in exchange for a certain Australian gentleman? Wouldn't buy any presents just yet if I were Julian.

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At least he is out for Christmas

unlike the troops.

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Stop

Before we get too excited

Has everyone forgotten about Bradley Manning, the guy that gave Mr Assange all these juicy headline grabbing leaks?

Because Wikileaks sure as hell seems to have forgotten and that poor bastard will be spending Christmas in the slammer wondering if he will be executed for treason.

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He is not forgotten

Bradley Manning is considered a hero in some parts of the good old us of a. The Berkeley City Council is voting on crowning him a hero!

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Alert

Next in the dock

Alan Rushbridger, Editor of The Guardian

Simon Kelner, Editor of The Independent

Mark Thompson, Director General of the BBC

Wait, they're not being indicted? I could have sworn I was reading the cables on the Guardian's website, and watching news broadcasts regarding the contents of them on BBC Breakfast.

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Obviously

"Stephens also claimed that Sweden will defer its molestation and rape investigation if the US brings such spying charges"

This line confirms the motive behind the prosecution of Julian Assange- don't smear his character USA if you have a problem , kill him. Then the world will see what goes on in the governments around the world.

Anon

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Except the US has the death penalty for spying

And the UK has a policy of not extraditing where the subject is likely to end up being executed.

Being as Mr Assange's final destination is more likely than the US than Sweden and various newspapers and Congressmen have called for his prosecution under laws carrying the death penalty I think and hope it's unlikely that the extradition will succeed.

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@John G Imrie

Even it it actually was a potential death penalty case, all it takes to clear that hurdle for extradition is a sufficient assurance that a death penalty won't be sought.

It's been done before. No reason it couldn't be done again.

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All that means...

... is that the stage is set for a deal. The Americans say "if you extradite him, we promise not to kill him"; the British gov't proudly announces "Look, we won this concession from the Americans!"; then Assange goes off to do 20-to-life in a federal prison, and everyone saves face.

It's happened before, it'll happen again.

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Grenade

Until...

he becomes "involved" in an incident in prison ultimately leading to him dying due to injuries sustained? Knife wound, shot?

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UmmmKayyyyyy

And the UK has a policy of not extraditing where the subject is likely to end up being executed

Unless the USA tells us to.

Does the flight **USUALLY** go London Heathrow LHR >> New York JFK >> Stockholm Arlanda ARN ???

Oops rendition time!

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Tweeting live from court...

"Perhaps that's a more substantial move towards greater official openness than marked by Assange's publication of the US embassy cables".

I'd love to read an officially sanctioned tweet reporting a super-injunction...

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Another secret every man and dog know about .... and should know about.

"Sweden's ongoing attempt to extradite Assange is not his only legal problem. His lawyer Mark Stephens said in an interview with David Frost over the weekend that a grand jury in Virginia has been secretly considering indicting Assange under the US Espionage Act."

That appears to be typical of US secrets and makes a mockery of US security. Uncle Sam has lost the plot and is doing itself great self harm with its pathetic posturing trying to defend the indefensible.

If you have secrets you have something bad to hide ..... for anything good one just loves to share.

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Anonymous Coward

The title is required, and must contain letters and/or digits.

"If you have secrets you have something bad to hide ..... ." - you're not related to a certain founder of a large internet ad brokerage by any chance, are you?

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FAIL

RE: Another secret every man and dog know about .... and should know about.

Of course, Mark Stephens could claim anything he liked and people like you would lap it up unquestioningly. If it's a "secret" grand jury how would Mr Stephens know about it? And before you lot hyperventilate yourselves into space, the Espionage Act does not carry an automatic death sentence for the guilty.

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CEO, not founder

CEO, not founder

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This post has been deleted by a moderator

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Grenade

The Sequence

Sweden charges Assange while he is in Sweden

Sweden drops charges

Sweden reinstates charges when he is in UK

Assange arrested and held on those charges in UK

US indicates they want Assange on spy charges. Luckily he is already in custody in a friendly country that has an extradition treaty with US.

Sweden says we really don't want him if the Yanks want him that bad.

Assange gets flown over the pond by friendly FBI agents.

Sweden gets a really favourable financial payoff from the US Government.

OK, the last two have not happened yet, but is there any doubt in anyone's mind that it won't???

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Doubt in mine.

He's an Australian. Don't think it can happen.

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There is another step, methinks

If the Swedish government extradites Assange to the USA, they won't win another election in many decades, and be marked as traitors by a good % of their own population. Applying centre-right policies is one thing, playing a role part in this sad judicial charade is a different one. So the GOP in Sweden may get a financial payoff from USA, but they -the Alliance for Sweden- won't enjoy it for long.

And further on, if the States imprisons Assange -or murders him- a new wave of anti-Americanism will probably make them pay dearly for the privilege.

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WTF?

eeehhhh....

I'm not so Sure. The UK has a policy of not extraditing to face the death penalty. Sweden, in saying that they will send him to the US to face espionage charges, is basically telling the UK not to send him there.

At least that's my take on it.

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One thing missing

It's worth noting that he was arrested voluntarily - i.e. he showed up at the police station and handed himself in. Otherwise a good summary...

However I can't see that the US would actually need Sweden involved. If they indicated they wanted Assange on spy charges, the arrest sequence would work as above.

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@NoneSuch

If the Swedes hadn't done /anything/ after Assange came to the UK, what difference would it actually have made?

Unless Assange was just on the point of fleeing the UK after spending some time here presumably *not* worried enough about the USA to make him go elsewhere, why would charges need to be laid to keep him here?

Why bother getting the Swedes to do anything?

How long would it take to get a Grand Jury to approve the laying of charges, if an administration had any kind of rush on.

Surely it couldn't take too long?

At the moment, the USA has the luxury of being able to talk about what it wants to do, but I'm guessing that if Assange had been free and suspected to be about to leave, they'd have managed to do without that luxury if necessary.

On the other hand, whatever the actual merit of the Swedish allegations may be, if the Swedes were genuinely just looking at processing the case like any other, then it'd be fairly understandable why they might not want to get at all involved in the whole extradition thing. There'd be little chance of glory, and potentially all kinds of legal hassle which they can turn into Somebody Else's Problem just by deferring their investigation.

Who wouldn't take that option if they had the chance?

If deferring the investigation is the smart move even if the investigation is a genuine one, it wouldn't make logical sense to use a deferral as evidence that it's part of a conspiracy

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Big Brother

Being Australian is no protection

The Australian government is already sucking up to the yanks and they have already declared him to be a very naughty boy. It will be just the same as the other aussie that ended up in gitmo. The Australian government will do nothing and behind the scenes they will get a nice present for christmas from the yanks.

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One rather major error in your sequence

Charges have not been laid in Sweden at any time. He's wanted for 'questioning', it's a fishing expedition, nothing more or less from a legal point of view. From a political one however...

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Re: The Sequence

It must be a conspiraceee!!!! Oh, wait, do you have evidence for your claims?

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The Australian government ...

<<will do nothing and behind the scenes they will get a nice present for christmas from the yanks>>.

..which we'll see sometime in the future on Wikileaks...

Don't the Yanks say, "What goes around, comes around"??

The words "Chickens" + "Roost" sprang to mind as soon as I saw the video "Collateral Murder".

Now, it seems we have Turkeys voting for Christmas. Anyone for a turkey-shoot? Or, is fish in a barrel more the Fed's style?

This is better than Agather Christie's 'Mousetrap'. The 'Mousetrap' ended. This won't.

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Grenade

Flight Risk - me arse

How can anyone consider him a flight risk - it would be professional and reputational suicide and probably massively damage Wikileaks.

By running it would effectly allow opponents and critics of Wikileaks to take the high ground.

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Actually

I can see any flight he might be on as being in great risk from "unspecified terrorist" S.A.Ms

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Coat

RE: Gordon 10

That and the fact he's currently the most popular and recognisable person in the world right now.

Do you think people ever walked past Michael Jackson and didn't notice him?

Gone to pay bail for Assange, defender of Free Speech

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