Feeds

back to article Microsoft and IBM web-control war finally silenced

One era in web politics has passed with the closure of the Web Services Interoperability (WS-I) organization just as another era has opened. The WS-I said Wednesday after nearly 10 years it's winding down operations and merging its assets and maintenance of its specs to OASIS. The group said the release of WS-I member approved …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Thumb Down

Never heard of business use

Sorry but WS-i has and is used for those big apps that businesses use which never appear on the web. Maybe its my pet gripe but the world+dog doesn't actually code for facebook or google apps or a "cloud frenzy". Are you trying to claim that the majority of big business apps are using JSON for communication?

0
0
Bronze badge

WS-* in business

Indeed . We have plenty of customers - people who do real computing, with actual consequences, that undergirds the economy - who need to expose and/or consume SOAP-based web services with WS-* standards requirements. REST is fine for diddling Amazon's catalog or sticking a Google map into your "mashup" site, but mundane B2B commerce still uses lots of SOAP. (And, of course, other protocols, including many non-HTTP ones like ISO 8583.)

0
0
Thumb Down

the pendulum swings

By all means, have a ball coding to single-vendor APIs after they have fenestrated your enterprise. When you find that you have zero interoperability across and between your vendors and that you have locked yourself into a solution that both costs too much and no longer works for you - you might want to start thinking about those "paper specs" again.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Eh...you every used them?

Sorry but we have clients which are Java based solutions communicating with us (if anything we get problems with low level disagreements on the http protocol..but I digress). The fact is that the article shows much interest in buzzy tech and b**ger all with what actually gets used. Ho hum...

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.