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back to article Apple's Mac App Store opens doors to devs

Apple's soon-to-be-opened Mac App Store began accepting submissions from developers on Thursday, 16 days after Steve Jobs unveiled it at his "Back to the Mac" event in mid-October. Although the OS star of that event was Mac OS X Lion, Jobs isn't holding up the Mac App Store until that cat pads into the market next summer. If all …

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Paris Hilton

Re: "there's a potential dark side to the Mac App Store"

Well, you know it just might be:

Mac App Store

+ reaches standards set by Apple for your increased pleasure, security and peace of mind?

+ ensures that technical proficiency is maintained

+ keeps scammers at bay

+ protects the legitimate interests of you the consumer, the legitimate developer and protects Apple brand name and quality standards

Is it half empty or half full?

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Jobs Horns

Competition

What about competition? You can't add an app that competes with an Apple product. iTunes comes as standard so it'll become the defacto way to obtain software, people not on the list will find their products wither away and die as products which are in the store gain the headlines. But lets work through your list

1+ = no, you'll just have a common denominator, and the ability for Apple to delete software you have purchased from your computer, really secure that

2+ = nope, fart apps are not really technically proficient are they? You're also beholden to Apple for what they consider technical so no porn unless it's sanctioned by Jobs

3+ = hell no, biggest scammers out there are Apple, taking a cut of 30% which people will have to stomach rather than selling it on their own website because *not* being in the app store is going to kill small developers who rely on the Mac

4+= legitimate interests? Competition is a legitimate interest, it keeps prices down and lets the market judge, not some Apple drone who'll disallow a product because Apple make it, even though the product offered is much better than the Apple product, so you'll just have to search the internet for it, but why bother, just use iTunes... Good grief, if MS tried that they would be fined a billion dollars a day, oh well, let's hope MS goes bankrupt so Apple can get the nice anti-trust rullings set against them.

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FAIL

@AC: Utter rubbish

"What about competition?" In case you missed it, this will not be the only place to buy apps. Think of it more as the development of http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/

"1+ = no, you'll just have a common denominator, and the ability for Apple to delete software you have purchased from your computer, really secure that" FUD. Apple will not be able to delete apps from the desktop.

"2+ = nope, fart apps are not really technically proficient are they? You're also beholden to Apple for what they consider technical so no porn unless it's sanctioned by Jobs" The 'no-porn' strawman. I don't recall any porn apps that exist. Most of it is to be found on the internet, of which Apple have no control over. More FUD then.

"3+ = hell no, biggest scammers out there are Apple, taking a cut of 30% which people will have to stomach rather than selling it on their own website because *not* being in the app store is going to kill small developers who rely on the Mac" How old are you? Ask any independent developer how much it cost to develop, host and distribute a site for a new app. Ask them how much of the the revenue is spent on distribution and advertising. You do know that you often have to pay for reviews?

"4+= legitimate interests? Competition is a legitimate interest, it keeps prices down and lets the market judge, not some Apple drone who'll disallow a product because Apple make it, even though the product offered is much better than the Apple product, so you'll just have to search the internet for it, but why bother, just use iTunes... Good grief, if MS tried that they would be fined a billion dollars a day, oh well, let's hope MS goes bankrupt so Apple can get the nice anti-trust rullings set against them." Baseless FUD from an individual that clearly has no interest in the platform. How is the Apple App Store any different to something like Bodega? This is just like the Software Centre in Ubuntu, but because you are blatantly a fanboy of Microsoft, and IYNSHO Apple cannot have any kind success, Apple's motives are evil. How about the fact that Mac users already have to search the internet to find software? Apple users cannot pop along to PC World and pick up a copy of PhotoShop for Mac like Windows users can. I suppose you want Apple to close the retail stores too since they don't promote competition. Are you posting this out some altruistic ideals? No. You are trolling. The last lines of you puerile missive tell us that...

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Anonymous Coward

Re: Competition

AC wrote: "..let's hope MS goes bankrupt so Apple can get the nice anti-trust rullings"

You are afraid that a company with a 5-10% market share (up from approx. 3%) can restrain competition, so you hope they reach 90% so the might be accused of abusing a monopoly position? Wouldn't it be simpler to say, "I hate everything about Apple and I wish it would just curl up and die!!"?

I'm happy to hear criticism of Apple if it comes from people who sound as if they care. For example, If Mac developers are concerned about the upcoming store, that's cause for concern. But most of the hoopla seems to be coming from people who do not own or use Macs and seem unlikely to ever do so. What's the point?

1. Apple doesn't have a track record of gratuitously yanking stuff from their customers phones. It's a good idea if they can to block criminal activity.

2. I don't see the connection between technical proficiency and fart apps. An app can be both technically robust and functionally pointless.

3. 30% is extremely good for what Apple is offering. I frequently have to part with 40-50%, and some have to pay even more to retailers. *And* Apple is reviewing your software - that's not a hindrance, it's a bug plus. Testing is expensive.

4. Competition? Covered above - Apple is a minority player, and they have to compete very hard to survive. If Apple handles the App Store badly, it will be the loser. As far as I can see, they are trying very hard to walk a middle line on all these issues.

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Personally I'm keeping an open mind on this one

I can see the arguments about the Mac App Store possibly distorting the market, but then I can also see that it might bring a bunch of benefits.

One thing that no-one seems to mention in all the hoopla over this is that Apple are halfway to an App Store for the Mac already with the Apple downloads listings - http://www.apple.com/downloads/ - all it's missing is a centralised billing mechanism and one-click purchase/installation.

Just a few thoughts on some of your list:

1) They've had a kill switch on the iPhone since the App Store opened, and to my knowledge there has only been one example of it *possibly* being used - even that one hasn't been proven (NDrive - some people lost the app, lots of others didn't, though). I suspect it's basically a "nuclear" option in case something nasty slips through the net, the prospect of which doesn't bother me at all considering the kill switch track record on the iPhone up to now.

2) Enough with the fart apps thing. Yes, there are a lot in the iPhone store - doesn't mean they're successful, though, does it? As for porn, what sort of porn app would be worth it on a Mac? They only really worked on the iPhone because they were pseudo web-sites optimised for the phone screen. Not really an issue on a full-blown computer. And you'll have a web browser (or two, or three) available anyway. Looks like a non-issue to me, TBH.

3) Actually, lots of developers liked the iPhone store model as it was an *improvement* on the terms of the other mobile app stores like Handango. It gives you a nicely pre-rolled way to market and sell a small app, with the billing mechanism etc all handled by Apple as part of their cut, which seems quite reasonable considering the services they are supplying.

As for the motive behind the whole thing, Apple has always been about the user experience and much of what was recently announced was about folding things that have worked well in iOS back into OSX proper. From a user's viewpoint, having a central place to go for apps that have been checked out for malware and won't mess up the system, with a simple purchase and installation mechanism has been huge winner on iOS, so they're offering the same for Macs. Makes a whole lot of sense in the context, and (at least so far) they aren't aiming to make it the *only* way to install apps on the Mac.

NB I don't think Apple are saints - they are out to make money like any big corporation, but they tend to do it by making stuff people like and find easy to use. I think this is just more of the same.

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Thumb Up

iTune not mandatory for apps?

I see apps being distributed over independent portals and as freebees in magazines, especially when several OSs exist.

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Fart apps

...with a real keyboard. I can't wait.

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Dark side

... is that the apps won't be allowed to poop icons all over your Dock and Desktop?

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Silver badge

Think I'll stick with Steam

Valve decided to include both Mac and Windows versions of games in the price for those games which are available on both platforms, you can share your game saves between platforms, and you can download your games on as many computers as you like.

It means I can go back to Windows with the minimum of fuss should His Steveness decide to lock everything down in 10.8 or 10.9 and Snow Leopard or Lion become unsupported within 3 years or so.

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JDX
Gold badge

So the App Store...

...it's for people too stupid to use the internet?

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(Written by Reg staff)

Re: So the App Store...

By that logic, Steam is for "people too stupid to use the internet".

So that's many hundreds of thousands of gamers who are "too stupid to use the internet", eh?

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It's not the same

Steam were one of the first companies to provide a service that was secure, yet did not inconvenience the customer. Frequent sales and new titles help drive its popularity too.

Since Steam started up, other competitors have started to offer services that don't persecute the user when they want to download an app.

Still, a OS vendor lead app store may be a game changer. Productivity application vendors are probably a bit more clued up than the awkward invasive DRM that characterised the early attempts to sell games, but not all of them are perfect. Despite any approval issues that might exist with the new app store it should at least offer an incentive for the less functional software stores to improve their offerings a little.

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JDX
Gold badge

no

Steam's a special case, just for games.

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Welcome to the Internet

It's full.

Push off.

I'd like to nominate this thread as the 'Too stupid to use the "Reply to Post" thread'.

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Go

What's the problem?

I'll still be able to buy software in the normal way. it just gives me an alternate means to do so. If they were taking away the ability to manage my own computer then I'd wipe off Snow Leopard and expand my Win7Pro partition to the full disk but it's just something else.

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Anonymous Coward

If only devs could unionise more.

Then they'd just refuse to accept apple's overbearing bullshit as a distribution method and it would be allowed to die.

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Jobs Horns

Fine But No Lockout

I have no problem with Apple wanting to run a walled garden app store for their OS X hardware. I would have a problem if they ever tried to lock down application usage as they do with the iPhone/IPad devices. That arrangement is ripe for anti-trust action.

They can have an app-store as long as it doesn't prevent access to competing software from alternate sources. The customers bought the damned hardware and though somehow permitted, Apple has no grounds to stop people from using or developing on it the way they see fit.

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Paris Hilton

I don't think therefore I am not?

Well, I suppose an Apple store selling Apple approved goods to Apple publicised standards might not be too unreasonable and what stops any developer selling stuff for Mac away from the Mac app store?

I don't buy into this one way for all across the market but I do buy into Apple's ecosystem of doing stuff their way. It suits me fine :-)

I do believe that there are multiple ways of doing stuff of which Apple's is just one and as has been pointed out, one that does not have a monopoly in the market.

Maybe (just maybe?) the world really is big enough to accommodate Apple's way, Googles way, Microsoft's way, Linux's ways and if so, what is wrong with that?

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Alert

Ironic typo in Apple Store developer requirements

One of the Apple Store guidelines at http://pastie.org/1236378 forbids typos in Apple product names:

"5.4 Apps that misspell Apple product names in their app name (i.e., GPS for Imac, iTunz) will be rejected"

But because of a typo in the rule itself -- "i.e." should have been "e.g." -- If that rule is taken as written it means that the *only* misspellings that will be rejected are "GPS for Imac" and "iTunz"!

Hint: "i.e." means "specifically", whereas "e.g." means "for example". For more explanation, see Common Errors in English Usage:

http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/e.g.html

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