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back to article EU to lift flight ban on carry-on liquids

The European Union has certified a liquid-detection security scanner that will allow that £20 1.75 liter bottle of Bombay Sapphire you bought at the Duty Free shop to come aboard your flight in your carry-on bag. "The next generation of X-ray technology has arrived, with a market-ready machine that can detect liquid threats," …

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Erm.. duty free shops

You can buy liquids in the duty free shops now, they are AFTER security.

I imagine of course that they will welcome you being able to buy bottles of wine in local supermarkets and bring that home instead of having to buy it in duty free.

I suppose they are currently deeply upset at having to charge you 2quid for a bottle of water after security.

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Unhappy

Transfering sir?

"You can buy liquids in the duty free shops now, they are AFTER security."

Which is all very well on a single flight, but then the idiots will take it off you at your next transfer point as you have to go through security *again* for no obvious reason!

This often wastes more time as you have to queue with everyone starting there as well, and makes the whole flying experience even more shitty. 10-20 years ago I actually looked forward to flying somewhere, now I really don't.

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@Erm.. duty free shops

You're OK as long as you don't have any connecting flights.

If, for example, you fly from Sydney to Heathrow with a connecting flight to Manchester (or any other EU destination) - you can take the duty free grog you bought at Sydney airport on the flight to LHR, but you won't be allowed to take with you on the connecting flight.

You used to be able to transfer it to your checked luggage when you went through customs, but I've heard they've put a stop to that.

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FAIL

"The threat... became apparent following discovery of a plot ..."

Excellent. I'm going to plot to take down an airplane using small bags of peanuts, crisp flight attendants' uniforms, and flat metal tips of seat belt buckles. I look forward to the pretzeline contortions the hand-wringing safety lunatics will use to combat *that* deadly foe.

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Stop

Err...

Whenever I have flow between England and Germany (a frequent trip) I have always been able to carry bottles purchased in Duty Free in my hand luggage?

Am I missing something here? Or has this article completely missed the point?

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Anonymous Coward

Magnificent development we'll all be grateful for

What a product! "After all, one can't be too careful.", so I for one am grateful to FearTech PLC for their timely contribution to the Be Scared Of Everything With A Colour Code market, which I believe will save me many seconds of dry parched lips at airports in the years to come. I particularly admire the fiendish Public Money Drainage Mechanism (which must have taken the sales people minutes to perfect in front of a Smirk Reduction mirror) and the media-friendly Kings New Clothes filter which will guarantee genuine British airports are the envy of every country without naturally cynical populations or meaningful airport security. (Those such as Germany may feel more confident sticking with adequately rigorous routines, common sense and well paid and trained personnel who understand 'polite' is not just a word).

I feel safer already and I look forward to a further wave of hyped Hi-tech/hi price FlimFlamWare designed to deliver innovative solutions to fight the yet-to-be-invented non-threats of the near future, while delivering outstanding shareholder value!

We musn't let the Pedterrorunionbenefitscroungerists destroy our way of life!

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WTF?

did i miss anything ?

the duty free shop is after the security checks where the liquids are limited. if im not right correct me

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It depends...

All the airports in the UK that I have used have the shops on the far-side of the scanners. However, Prague airport has them before the scanners (one set per two gates), and so stuff bought in the airport is scanned.

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Megaphone

usual rubbish

in one terminal in Amsterdam Schipol ( contary to Dutch marketing, its not a fantastic place to shop but rather dull and boring), one cannot buy water, but one can buy alcohol.

Really, its the aeroport ensuring passengers have to buy the water on the 'plane. They used to sell the dangerous molecular mix in speaically labelled plastic bags, but then stopped because of security [financial] concerns. However, you can still buy any bottle of _alcohol_ in a specially sealed plastic bag and take this through.

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IIRC

Didn't that 2006 liquid explosive plot have some one involved that was working as a security guard at the airport? In that case the explosive could just be carried in by said guard.

At least this means I can bring my pair of 1L water bottles past the check point and not have to bend over and grab my ankles when I buy a beverage inside the "secured" area as is currently the case.

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1A

Still won't help - You can walk through security today with a few litres of liquid, so long as they are in a bag (camelback style) not a bottle...

"After all, one can't be too careful. According to Basu: "The threat from Liquid, Aerosol and Gel (LAG) based explosives became apparent in August 2006 following discovery of a plot to use such devices aboard multiple transatlantic flights."

If I discovered a plot to use a pair of trousers to hijack a plane that wouldn't make trousers dangerous.

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Reporter in wrong place.

The current system in Europe means that carry-on liquids are removed either at passport control or at the departure gate, depending on where the airport prefers to do its X-ray checks.

In both cases, duty-free shops, being airside, are required to provide a sealed bag for any purchases, to prove non-contamination. If you were checked before buying (at passport control) this doesn't make much difference to you, and if you're checked at the gate, you're passed through without hassle anyway as long as you didn't break the seal.

This new gadget, while obviously a wonderful thing, will probably make very little difference to the volume of duty-free (and other airside airport shop) sales, as provision for these is already made, and no effective restrictions on them currently exist.

The shops' profit margins might rise slightly if they don't have to pay for the bags, of course, but if you're a supplier of those bags, you won't be happy. As an airport operator, you probably won't be happy about having to assume the extra cost either.

This should all be obvious to anyone who has flown in Europe recently... but may not be so obvious to those who choose to take the marketing guff at face value...

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Grenade

Oh joy!

Flying, or rather the process of working ones way through the trauma that is the airport, is definitely one of my "room 101" things. It's managed to turn from something that was quite exciting (ok - I was younger then) to something that I dread. if you're not being prodded, poked or photographed then you're being bombarded with "buy this!!!" or standing around in endless queues waiting for fools that can't seem to follow the very basic check-in procedure.

"Duty free" it might be, but they make a shit-load of profit!! Considering the duty makes up a significant proportion of the price of booze (and especially fags), then being "duty free" SHOULD mean your bottle of Bombay Sapphire is more like a fiver rather than the twenty quid they fleece you for.

And what they ought to do to the idiots that put us in this situation with not being able to take liquids on a flight is make them go through the process of getting through an airport, five times a day, every day, for the rest of their lives.

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Duty free shops will benefit?

Surely duty free shops aren't affected - unless I mis-remember the procedure, you're relieved of any excess liquids as you pass through security scanning and then can buy whatever you like in the airside duty free shops.

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Eh ?

Do you lot fly ? You cant take liquid through security, but anything you buy in the "duty-free" rip-off merchants after security is flyable. At least it is in every airport Ive been to recently. The only thing that might change is the ability for the thieving assholes to name their price for a bottle of water.

And the security people are all shit anyway. I have continued to carry on a bottle of water and a tin of deodorant on all flights I go on. In maybe a hundred or so flights the only operator that has noticed was in a backwater airport in the Cook Islands. LAX, Boston, all the US ones never bat an eyelid. Same for our supposedly high security London airports.

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Flame

Liquid bomb plots

Would that have been the one where a bunch of amateurs planned to detonate 5 separate bombs in 5 aircraft and when an experienced ordnance tech tried to repeat their plan it took him 36 attempts to get an actual explosion?

BTW Just because a scanner now exists does not mean the merkins will relax their demands.

Besides think how many people the TSA now employs. Where else would some of these rather gravitationally challenged specimens get such well paying jobs.

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An improvement, but...

All this window dressing is just security theater. No more, no less. They don't allow mere mortals past "security" so I can help my (92 year old) Mother-in-law.

Maybe now I can take a cheeseburger on board since the airlines don't provide food any more. One can only hope?!

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Umm

You have been able to take duty free bottles of booze onboard in hand luggage even since the liquids ban - I have done it myself, more than once in the past 12 months and never had an issue.

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FAIL

Get your facts right.

Duty free goods are allowed on board aircraft and always have been because they are purchased in a "sterile" area AFTER security. What this change will allow is the carrying of duty-PAID goods in hand baggage.

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Stop

Computer says no

I can see that working well at airports...

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FAIL

erm...

You can already carry on duty free in the EU, you have always been able to because it is sold in sealed bags with the receipt often in or stapled on the bag.

I imagine this will make it possible for already purchased perfume bottles, and other such accessories to be carried through security.

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WTF?

looks at calendar

No, not April 1.

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FAIL

Ummm.........

You can do this now with a remarkable invention called a polythene bag. This innovative technology allows you to seal the bottle in a "security bag" (AKA polythene bag) which the vendor provides free of charge.

Alternatively you could just not bother with the bag as you are already through the security checks.

Some clues for the clueless here :

1) There is no "duty-free" allowance within the EU - with the exception of anomalies like the Canaries;

2) Due to 1) the "Duty Free" shops won't sell you anything without seeing your boarding card to verify you're leaving the EU;

3) All the "Duty Free" shops are in the departures area. You've already been searched and relieved of any "dangerous" liquids by then. Lots of other shops sell liquids too. Nobody cares and nobody checks what you carry on the plane.

So all this new machine will do is INCREASE the ludicrous "security checks" as everyone's half empty bottle of water will need to be scanned.

Lovely :(

PS - its my experience that pretty much all "departure-side" shops won't sell you anything without seeing a boarding card, the details of which are recorded so there IS a record of what you purchased.

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However . . .

. . . until UK airports recognise the "sealed by duty free" stickers, you still wont be able to buy duty free on a transatlantic flight, if you have an onward flight once you land in the UK.

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Anonymous Coward

Let's hope it's really accurate

Let's hope it's really accurate. Airplane explosions at 30,000 ft. are tough to survive. Is a bottle of booze worth dying for?

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FAIL

Maybe not...

... but freedom is.

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Get some perspective

270 people died in the Lockerbie Bombing. 2000 people die a year on the roads. I ride motorcycles. I am quite happy risk a small increase in the chance of being blown up in a plane if it means we lose some of the scare-mongering and stupid security measures and get some freedom back. Its just another way of Governments controlling people.

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If it saves the life of one child...

it's worth f*cking up the lives of every other poor sod on the planet. And it's a big if in the first place.

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FAIL

errrr...

you can, of course already buy drink in the duty free as it's after the security check....

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FAIL

Errr, Rik....

Here in the EU we are *already* allowed to take liquids obtained "airside" on to the aircraft. And there aren't really duty-free sales, as such.

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FAIL

airport security

this from the people that let me on with 2 litres of water in a blader pack after going through the scanned 4 times (looking for a pair of forgoten side cutters)

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FAIL

As a courtesy to foreign readers

> containers ranging from 80ml to 2000ml (2.7 ounces to 2.1 quarts).

While I appreciate the translation into foreign measure, I feel that the two sets of measurements should have been interchanged, with the foreign measure being put into the brackets since it is the translation, not the original.

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WTF?

Or better still...

...omit the medieval measurement bollocks. This is 2010, not 1020.

WTF is a "quart" anyway? Is it 25% of the volume of King Harold's daily bowel movement?

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Happy

@Blue eyed boy

You might like to note this websites URL.

The UK has used the metric system for some time.

AFAIK only 3 countries in the world use the old *Imperial* (that is the *proper* name for this set of rather archaic weights and measures, dating from the time the UK *had* an empire ) standards.

The US is 1. Another is an African country (presumably an old colony of the UK) and the 3rd escapes me just now.

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FAIL

Imperial Measurements

At least one of the countries using "Imperial" measurements is doing it wrong. They're called "English" units over there however there's 16Floz in a US pint. Which makes their pints and quarts 20% smaller than the true Imperial versions. Also they don't know what a stone is.

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Duty free

You can already take liquids bought from duty free shops on board planes in the EU, it's liquids that aren't bought in the duty free area that you can't.

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Which 'Duty Free' store is this?

Its been a few years since I've found a duty free shop that's actually cheaper than our local booze shop! Well unless its something you cant buy in the UK like those unique malt whiskies that if they had a shop you could access without a passport would be busy processing returns.

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Pint

Duty Free?

I'm a bit confused about the emphasis on duty free sales in this article. If you are flying EU to EU airport, you are already able to take on-board whatever quantity of liquid purchased in duty free, in departures, after going through security, you like. Therefore the bottle scanner will have much more significant implications for other carry on liquid items bought from outside of an EU airport, including duty free bought in an airport outside the EU where there is a transfer through an EU airport (when carry on liquids are not allowed to be transferred). Duty free sales inside the EU will not be significantly affected.

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FAIL

You can already take duty free's on board.

You can already take duty free liquids on board if your flight is in Europe and you purchased them at the airport after security.

Excerpt from the BA website -

"You can purchase duty-free liquids at the airport or on board if your journey is wholly within the EU."

Do you really think that the airport operators would have allowed this to be banned? It would have meant most of the airports in Europe going bankrupt. These days it seems that airport design is focussed solely on making sure you pass the maximum number of shops on your way to the gate.

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Silver badge

Not your standard response

Not wishing to point out the obvious misapprehension about duty free (whoops, just did!), but having a "binary: "pass", and you're happily aboard ..." just passes the burden (or perk, depending on how vindictive you think the plastic piggies on security desks are) of taking away your cheap bottle of local brandy from the "underpaid, over-hassled, grumpy airport-security drone" to an "underpaid, over-hassled, grumpy programmer drone" instead.

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''Liquids bought in transit''

I thought so -- only the over priced stuff that you bought at the air-port, they will still stop you bringing in a bottle of water that you bought elsewhere -- thereby preserving their profits by forcing you to buy from their shops.

It is largely cobblers anyway, provides jobs for the otherwise unemployable, keeps the ''security'' industries in business and keeps the population in fear. I remember the IRA campaign in the 1970's -- we just got on with it.

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How can you say that!

Are you possibly suggesting that all this security theatre is NOT for our safety? What a thing to say. After all, we had one chap who nearly managed to blow up his shoe and another who sacrificed his balls when he set fire to his underpants. How is this not the most serious threat to our transport network since conductors were taken off buses and the UN commission on biological warfare banned the British Rail sandwich?

As for the IRA campaign - well that was a completely different problem. They looked like all the other white people around them. How could you possibly demonise a group who were the same religions as a lot of the indigenous population and were so well liked that the americans financed their activities?

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Its not a problem getting liquids on the plane

Once you are past the scanners, where duty free is normally located.

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Megaphone

At (almost) bleeding last.

Thank (insert choice of deity) for that. I accept that until they have a scanner they need to limit liquids carried on board. What I have never managed to swallow(!) is that there is no potable water available once you pass security unless you pay the RIP-OFF prices charged in the airport shops. Any supermarket will sell you a 1.5 litre bottle of agua for about 10-15p (just 12 cêntimos here in Portugal) but they want £1.50 for a litre at the airport.

I don't know why I haven't written to the DM about this.

Oh yes, I don't read it.

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Anonymous Coward

err

You....can bring duty free onto a plane already...

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Big Brother

Pardon?

1. Duty free purchases were never a problem, at least not in Europe. My cupboard is bulging with duty free whisky and other liquids bought in litre bottles in European airports. The real problem is the stuff you bring into the airport, such as shampoo, some locally bought wine, tube of shaving soap or, perhaps I should grow a beard, shaving razors.

2. Just how many credible, effective, actual incidents have there been that involved liquids? Not theoretical, real. I gather that within the Great Satan itself, for some time, perhaps still, one could fly with litres of stuff in the cabin baggage. I rather think that there are infinitely more actual terrorist or nutcase incidents causing real damage on the ground, outside airports and aircraft, in almost every country almost every day. Is this whole thing not just a con. trick to keep us nervous in the hope of putting off the real "terrorist"?

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FAIL

Duty Free purchases?

"will allow that £20 1.75 liter bottle of Bombay Sapphire you bought at the Duty Free shop to come aboard your flight in your carry-on bag."

Er, you can already take aboard liquids purchased from the Duty Free shops (well the airside one at least) as you're already passed security. How else would I get all that Ouzo home twice yearly?

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Huh?

Does the author not fly or is he based in the US? In the UK Duty Free is usually on the flight side of airport security and there is no problem with taking booze and liquid purchases from there onto flights.

This scanner would presumably means we can now take bottles of water and so on from home onto flights.

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Grenade

101

About bloody time. It's fine when you buy Duty Free in the airport; but when you buy a bottle on the outbound sector taking only hand-luggage, you have to check that bag in for the return leg. Fine on a proper airline like BA, prohibitively expensive on LyinAir (but then, aren't most things?).

It does remind me that, when the ban was first brought in, airport security were disposing of all the liquids in a single container. Apparently it took a while before the concept of "binary explosives" was explained to them...

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FAIL

Errr...

You could already take stuff purchased in the duty free shop through quite happily, because the duty free shops are between security and the plane. It was liquid from outside you couldn't take onboard.

This will have the in-lounge vendors in tears because during the restriction people couldn't even bring a bottle of water through and therefore pretty much had to buy anything they wanted to eat or drink from them.

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