back to article India gives BlackBerry reprieve, eyeballs Google, Skype

The Indian government has granted BlackBerry users a two-month stay of execution, while it evaluates RIM's latest interception facility and serves notice to Google and Skype. It's far from clear what RIM has promised the Indian government - neither party is prepared to provide details - but it's obviously enough for the Indians …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.
Anonymous Coward

Pointless

My e-mail server is in California and my correspondence with it (I'm in the UK) is encrypted also. Where are these countries drawing the line? Who would the British Government come after? They can't go for the ISP as that would cut my service off completely. They can't go after the Californian server. That leaves the only option of purloining my phone to ascertain what my e-mails are saying.

If private individuals can do this easy as pie and the terrorists are likely doing the same, (I can't see an enemy of the US using a US service for their communications.) then why are the governments chasing Google, RIM, et al? I can't understand why they don't simply face up to the fact that technology has given the individual citizen the ability to communicate outside their all reaching eyes.

I don't think terror is really at the heart of this. My own belief is that the Internet gives the people control over their government and they don't like it; particularly those which rule their population by religious fear.

This isn't protection against terrorism, it is government unable to control their population.

6
1
Silver badge
FAIL

Ever heard of the Patriot Act?

Your e-mail is wide open to the U.S. as they can access any and all computers under the Patriot Act. You will unlikely hear about it as the Act forbids notification to the monitored party.

Then the data can be shared under the Echelon system with the UK - so Blair, Brown, Cameron and Uncle Tom Cobley can all read your communications whilst you live in your imaginary 'private' world.

Sorry, SOOL.

2
4
Anonymous Coward

Not a problem

If the server is only storing encrypted e-mails, then what good will it do them to hijack the server?

1
1

Encryption

In most email setups, only the connection between the client and the server is encrypted (SSL). Emails sent between mail servers are in the clear and governments typically have the authority to demand access to the contents of mail servers, if armed with the correct warrants.

If you are exchanging encrypted emails, are you sure that the government does not have a backdoor to the algorithm you are using?

0
0

end-to-end

It's not end-to-end if it goes to a phone (Skype Out etc). And that's where the "telecoms" part comes in.

If it's computer-to-computer then it's encrypted but is it "telecoms" or whatever the Indian legislation defines? Sounds as though they're going down the DPI rathole.

1
0
Grenade

<shakes head>

Hahahaha we have been seeing this from most non 1st world countries over the last few years, in connection with resource, trade and local enterprise, now they are going after the web companies.

Have fun dealing with every departmental head who thinks the sun shines out of his backside and he is the only one who can be right. I can only shake my head is sympathy. I had a job a few years ago installing 20 client PC’s in to the secret service in Zimbabwe, I ended up with an official reprimand from the head of CIO for telling him that he could not have centralised security with out a network and a server of some description.

3
0
Silver badge
WTF?

Skype has vulnerabilities

Do you remember the insecure Skype server handling Chinese traffic that was located in HongKong? It involved Tom Online who monitored traffic for all the usual Chinese no-no words.

Details can be found here: < http://www.infowar-monitor.net/breachingtrust.pdf >.

0
1
Anonymous Coward

Silly politicians

Banning google. Just think if google retaliates by blocking Indian IP Addresses from its services who will it hurt most?

0
0
WTF?

Skype server?

Did I miss something?

I thought the whole point of Skype was that there isnt a server....?

Even the supernodes are picked dynamically?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

I think thats the subtext

It's a fools errand, and by targeting companies that provide useful tools for it's IT workforce (of which I daresay there is a substantial number of people) they're probably only going to hurt themselves.

Perhaps they'll outsource an IT project to China to create an in-house Indian Skype that they can monitor to their hearts desire. SkIpe?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Monitoring Skype

If you have the power of government, you might be able to ensure that certain folk you want to monitor have all their traffic diverted via your own network (without showing any extra hops) - and you might also ensure that the only supernodes that their Skype clients see belong to you.

It is known that the German security services can listen in to encrypted Skype calls.

0
0
Gold badge

Blackberry, Google, Skype should stand up to govts

"Even if the server isn't physically located within India, there's little moral problem with RIM offering equivalent access while an Indian server is being set up."

Yes there is. They shouldn't have access to begin with, and certainly can't be expected access to a server not even within their borders. Honestly, Blackberry, Google, and Skype should tell the Indian gov't to go fuck themselves, and lets see how popular the Indian gov't is when all these useful services start leaving the country. I know brits love being watched all the time, but I don't, and I don't see it as an inherent right that companies that have actually come up with secure solutions have to compromise them to meet some govt's whims.

0
0
This topic is closed for new posts.

Forums