Feeds

back to article iTunes disses doctorates

It appears that PhDs have joined pornography and Flash on the list of things Apple doesn't approve of, if the experience of Reg reader Stuart Thomason is anything to go by. Stuart explains: It seems that Apple have something against those of us with higher degrees. My title on my iTunes account has always been 'Dr', but a …

COMMENTS

This topic is closed for new posts.

Page:

Silver badge

PhDs

Unless you're actually giving medical treatment to people, calling yourself "Dr" is just pretentious; as is sticking long strings of letters after your name.

Went to school a bit longer than the rest of us? So what. Get over your selves.

Yours

Mr Code Monkey

14
36
Troll

Hey...

...it's not our fault we're better than you.

6
5
Headmaster

Actually...

...technically, medical doctors generally only have a bachelors degree, and their use of the title Dr is purely honorary.

19
1
Thumb Down

@Code Monkey

What a load of drivel.

What makes you think a medical doctor is any more deserving of the title than a social scientist, physicist, psychologist, etc that's spent years in study to earn a doctorate?

Seems you're jealous or, even more likely, just plain ignorant.

13
8
Silver badge

@Dr Anonymous Coward

I'm neither jealous nor ignorant. I'm just not in the least bit interested that you spent a few years extra at University, whatever it is you did.

8
21
Anonymous Coward

@AC 11:32

It's a fair point. I was at university for 8 years before I got my PhD, but mere "doctors" can get their (honorary) title in just 5.

3
0
Heart

Love the replies

If I stagger into the ER with a heart attack/stroke/spork wound and I say, "Help! I need a doctor!" the person that shows up better damn well be a doctor in the medical sense of the word.

I'm pretty sure this is what Code Monkey is alluding to - that a doctor can be both a title and a function, but when push comes to shove, one is more important than the other.

One last thing... only a bachelor's degree!?! Good grief! That. Is. Terrifying. Here in the States, at least, a bit more is required...

6
0
Bronze badge

Bachelor's Degrees

In the US are slightly different to those in the UK, ask any US exchange student who has studied at a UK institution they'll make you aware of the difference. When my qualifications were ratified for use in the US my Scottish O grades were equated to a HS diploma and my Scottish H grades (lower than A levels) were equated to college credits. From what I've seen if you look at a student who has completed a Masters in the US then their level is roughly comparable to an Honours graduate from a UK University.

1
0

re: bachelor's degrees

Fair enough. I wondered if it might be something like that... But still, someone mentioned needing 8 years for a PhD? Med school + internship is usually a minimum of 8 years here in the States, so I still don't think a PhD has any right to look down their nose at a "mere" MD :\ Well to be honest, I don't think a PhD has the right to look down their nose at anyone. With a good attitude, people may not feel inclined to read those three little letters as 'piled higher and deeper'.

2
1

Ah, now an MD is something else...

...that is actually a _Doctor_ of medicine. Then it stops being an honorary title. At least in the UK. The US and UK systems are very different, it seems. We specialise earlier, and can start on a medical degree straight from age 18 (after A levels), which gives leads to a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (which is actually just one degree, taking 5 or 6 years I understand). I gather the US system requires an undergrad degree before starting at med school.

Anyway, there's no evidence that this guy was looking down his nose at anybody- he just wanted to be addressed by the correct title!

5
0
Bronze badge
Pint

MD

is not the same in the UK as in the US, MD is a postgraduate qualification undertaken by Bachelors of Medicine. It can also be the equivalent of a DSc, which is a higher degree than PhD and is awarded for significant contribution to an area of work, generally by the University in which you obtained your first degree.

Generally people who look down their noses walk into walls no matter what their qualification, I think the guy in question was merely miffed at being denied the right to use the title he had worked hard to attain. The assertion that medical doctors are only called doctor out of courtesy is not totally true, some have the required qualifications others don't. Personally I'd rather have a competent one no matter what their level of academic achievement. Speaking as one who has a PhD I can say I've met proportionately more prats with PhDs than without, whether that makes me a prat or not I don't know. I'm sure my colleagues probably have opinions on that matter.

4
0

Asking for a doctor in an ER - here comes the physicist!

If you stagger into an ER and ask for a doctor, do you *really* think a non-medical doctor is going to say, 'what can I do for you?'

The criticism against non-medical doctors using the title is blatant, ignorant prejudice from people who don't understand what 'doctor' really means - someone who holds a doctorate*. And when they first learned that it doesn't just mean MDs, but also PhDs, they were probably embarrassed and had to take a contrary view and are too proud to acknowledge otherwise.

That said, I hold neither a doctorate nor a master's, bachelor's, or even associate's degree. Just a simple high school diploma with a few credits at university and quite a few years working at one with plenty of doctors, medical and not, whom I highly respect for their dedication and knowledge.

*Or, apparently in the UK, a medical bachelor! Which is news to me; and I've lived in London with a partner who's a nurse practitioner for about eight years!

1
1
Go

You're right.

Long acronyms after names are pretencious, and should never be done.

Edward M. BSc SSc GSc 50MSc

(Bronze Swimming certificate, Silver swimming certificate, Gold swimming certificate, 50m swimming certificate).

Yes this whole post was just to rip off Red Dwarf.

2
1
Anonymous Coward

Quick addition on Med School in the US

Medical School = 3 years classes, + 1 year internship. Then you are a Dr., except...

Residency now = 4 years or more ...

interesting factoid, whenever they compute "average salaries" for physicians, they typically include the residents, who are getting paid relative peanuts, and work 80hrs + a week.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

@@AC 11:32

You spent *five years* on a PhD? Jeez. I hope that wasn't on public funds.

0
0
Anonymous Coward

@@@AC 11:32

Read the post, dude. I was saying that you can be a medical doctor in five years. I did 4 years undergrad and 4 years postgrad physics. Or were you assuming that all undergrad degrees are three years? Maybe that's true in the liberal arts, but I wouldn't be able to do a liberal arts PhD on public money anyway!

But, yes, I was funded by EPSRC (i.e. government) for 3 years, then employed as a "consultant" for a few months, then I just had to manage for the rest of the last year. And I'd say that 12,000 GBP a year to do a PhD isn't really excessive (I have to eat, after all). Or would you rather that funding was cut so we became a country devoid of new scientists and engineers, and end up dramatically lagging behind the rest of the developed world?

0
0
Anonymous Coward

Yup. Happened to me as well

Took me all of three seconds to fix the problem.

Personally I never use the Dr. bit in public. 'Flux Creep in High-Tc Superconductors' leaves you looking a bit like a knob if you're asked to deal with a heart attack when staying away..

6
0
Silver badge

re. Yup, Happened to me as wel

You could try reversing the neutron flux. (If it's a heart attack, anything is worth a try.)

5
0
Go

Toes, toes, toes ....

... all stepped on and now I'm all whiny and hurt. Get a life doc ... nobody gives a shit.

8
10

Did you forget what you were saying before you finished?

"...nobody gives a shit" - well he does, clearly, or did you not notice that? Oh, wait; "now I'm all whiny and hurt" - you DID notice, you just forgot. You just can't hold one thought in your head for more than a single sentence (or perhaps it takes you so long to type so many words that you forget what you typed at the start). That's fine, completing primary school isn't for everyone.

0
0
Coat

It may be that apple is upset with PhD's...

... These smart people who spent years in their field studying everything that their is to know about it...

You know who they are, It's those with PhD's in Telecommunication that proved there *was* and antennagate...

Well now Apple can 't have a group of smart people like that using their devices now can they....

lol

:-D

...

...

Mines the one with the Diploma from Apple's "Internet Uni of phone design" in the inside pocket (I failed but got a Diploma and job there anyway...)

2
1
Flame

Does it really matter?

Oh dear. Does it really matter if he's addressed as Mr or Dr? Surely the title matters very little, as long as the work that he does, actually reflects his qualifications? Or does Mr Thomason just want the world and his dog to know that he spent another four years at Uni, writing a paper based on the work of others?

Flames, because I'm likely to offend a great deal of people with more qualifications that me. So that's everybody with an ordinary degree and above I suppose!

9
10
Silver badge

There's more...

".. So that's everybody with an ordinary degree and above .." (waves hello.)

When I recently bought something at Comet, on the customer details section of the screen (which I could see), the drop down menu for customer title included 'Lord'.

I can only assume that the back-office techies were having a bit of fun. Or, perhaps this was in response to Lord Somebody making a formal complaint about his title not being available when he went to buy something there.

0
0
FAIL

Ass hat

To get a PhD, you ignorant fucktard, you have to make an original contribution to your field of study.

6
1
Heart

Did I hit a nerve?

I'm betting that you have a PhD, and that you had to frequently reference other peoples work, am I right?

I know many, many people who have earned their PhD's but don't act like it's a cardinal sin to be addressed as something other than Dr. People who feel that that this is a problem deserve nothing but our disdain.

As long as the work that person does, adequately reward them for the time they have spent studying, does the lack of a title on an on-line music store, really matter? Maybe for a certain type of person, it does...

1
2
Anonymous Coward

@theres more

I am a developer in a bank, and all our software has either a list with 200+ entries, or a free format field.

You really don't want a Monseigneur* to complain!

*a genuine choice, although admittedly a large number of them are military, as they can be a bit funny about that sort of thing.

0
0
FAIL

O RLY!

Perhaps Apple decided that it was a waste of time leaving the Dr field in for it's one user with a triple digit IQ.

11
0
Bronze badge

Dweeb

Really who cares? I don't use any titles, even Mr unless I have no option. I've got a name and that's all you need. People who get uptight about titles have got problems.

7
2

Errr

Ok you have a PhD get over it

6
6
Jobs Horns

Any excuse from iTunes

My iphone has only been connected to one computer for its entire life, yet about once a month - completely independently of any upgrades - iTunes decides that the two devices have never met, and so to synchronise I have to have GB of apps, music, pictures deleted from the iPhone and the exact same files reinstalled.

Nothing to do with getting a PhD, I'm just a little older and wiser each month, and will certainly never buy another device relying on iTunes synch again.

12
0
Silver badge

Take it from me

Even us lowly Misters know to steer clear of iTunes. Once was enough

2
0
Thumb Down

@ Code Monkey

While I agree that iTunes is a steaming pile... I have to say that Microsoft Active Sync makes iTunes look like the pinnacle of software engineering.

I've just ditched my WinMo phone in favour of an iPhone - not because I'm a fanboi (actually I have a strong dislike for Apple and I'm well aware of the various problems iPhones have), but simply because I was sick of WinMo/ActiveSync and my preferred cellco didn't have any decent Android handsets.

PS. to show how crap ActiveSync is, it took me 2 days to extract my contacts of the WinMo phone without using Outlook. MS seem to go out of their way to make things difficult.

2
0
Headmaster

the reason you were asked for these details

it's no conspiracy this is part of apple's new policy of asking for a little bit of card information on each new device, as this only happened recently, Stuart probably hadn't done it yet on that device.

This was introduced after the recent spate iTunes accounts being stolen. It just means you need more than a single password to buy loads of apps from anywhere in the world.

hope that helps doc

0
0

Marketing reasons

I'm sure Apple has removed this option because it doesn't give them any information about your gender. Gender information is important for targeted marketing, and as Apple is increasingly becoming a medium for marketing, they want to collect as much information about you as possible.

4
0

A simple answer..

If they want to know your gender, they could just ask.. Can't remember of the top of my head if they do, and can't be bothered to look.

0
0
Thumb Up

simple solution

Add in an option asking Gender. Not that big of a deal!

1
0
jcw

I'll help

No guarantees, but if your name's Stuart the odds are in favour of you being male.

0
0

What about Miss?

Does Miss not exist as a title anymore? If not, why bother with titles at all? Surely if you can't input your correct title there seems to be very little point in them.

And as far as I can tell "Dr" has been used in relation to a PhD for over a millenium, whereas I don't think the medical doctor term has been around quite that long. Therefore are it not the medical doctors who are the pretenders? Not that I care.

7
0
Pint

You're wrong

You need to check your facts on PhD vs doctors of medicine being known as "doctors" first. If you don't care, don't comment incorrectly.

1
4

There you go

First PhD was issued in 1150, so not quite a millenia :p

2
0

i-phone + "Dr" = idiot

No more to say really.

1
3
Jobs Horns

Ha ha ha ha ha!

He wrote to Apple and was surprised they didn't reply?! Oh, that's hilarious.

Who does he think he is? Mark Papermaster?

1
0
FAIL

If you let in the Dr.s then...

you probably have to have the Profs, Revs, Right Revs and more...

I did notice this iTunes change last week when rolling out a new iPhone to some scientists at work - not my choice - if I had my way they'd be getting Androids, but FruitCo Marketing has obviously worked and too many decision makers think that the only toy to have is an iPhone.

1
1
Silver badge
Happy

Occupational titles

I (where possible) use the title Tn. (for technician). Except when I am in a Teaching role (I have formal qualifications for both) when I insist on Tr. When I am not operating in any qualified role I eschew a title.

It is rather fun responding to women colleagues who go on as if it is really edgy and modern using Ms. to remove their marital status from their title (admittedly a good thing as far as it goes) by responding that you have abandoned the entire gender designation! I'm never one to do things by half measures. :-D

2
0
Pint

Jesus Christ

And we thought the PhD guy in the article was an arse ...

1
0
Anonymous Coward

Genderless titles

How about Comrade? or Citizen? Probably both useful for targeted marketing.

0
0
Megaphone

You're miffed about Dr?...

...what about little Lord Fauntleroy? Or Queen Elizabeth? Earl Mountbatten of Burma? and so on...

0
2
Boffin

Surgeons....

Woe betide you call a member of the Royal College of Surgeons a Doctor or a member of the other colleges Mister...

2
0
Badgers

What about mil ranks?

I'm always miffed I can't use Flt. Lt. on forms

1
2
Troll

That's CrabAir for you.

nuff said.

0
0

Page:

This topic is closed for new posts.