back to article Visual Studio suits up for business apps

Microsoft is hiding some of Visual Studio's advanced coding capabilities to help suits build Office and SharePoint applications. The company is due to announce Visual Studio Lightswitch on Tuesday to not just simplify development of business applications but also to make it easier for IT teams to maintain such apps. Due to be …

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Tosh

"Under the covers it's Visual Studio, so hand-off to Visual Studio developers is simple, because it's a well-architected Visual Studio application," Mendlen said

Oh good God. It's bad enough picking up applications written by fellow developers, but picking up applications written by management!

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Agree

It sounds like Macromedia Contribute, on steroids (unfortunately, Raoul Moat was on steroids, and look where that ended).

Trying to read around the marketing gibberish in this article, it appears that Microsoft is telling managers that this product will turn Powerpoint decks into usable code, that can then be handed over to developers, for a bit of minor tweaking.

You know, Microsoft's *own* management believe this? It's how we got Vista.

You can spend three days thrashing out business logic with these people, only to conclude that the business isn't at all logical.

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Thought that was what Access was for...

...and we've all seen the chaos produced by Floundering Amateurs armed with Access.

Of course, MS doesn't care about the mess produced - as long as they can sell something shiny.

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Good idea, in theory

I know people on here will bitch and moan simply because it's something created by MS, but I've lost count of the number of times I've seen Excel spreadsheets and Access databases that would be far better as a tailored solution. The people making them aren't stupid, but can't graduate above Access VBA.

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Gates Horns

Re: Good idea, in theory

"The people making them aren't stupid, but can't graduate above Access VBA"

The learning curve for Access VBA is longer and steeper than, say, VB; and much more complex than C#. I used to worry about distributing a 60+MB runtime/support environment for a 3MB Access/VBA front end to SQL Server - Eventually I realized that a Windows distribution of 60MB was pretty small compared to the 3GB base install most punters had for XP plus another 1-3GB for Microsoft Office.

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FAIL

Meanwhile . . .

They change .NET so often applications from only a few years back no longer work.

Government websites can continue using plausible deniability when the share point is broken

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Anonymous Coward

RE: Meanwhile

Well, no. If you specify a specific version of the .Net framework in your applications configuration file it will run against that version. The framework supports side by side installations, meaning you can have 1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0 alongside each other. Further, each release is designed to be backwards compatible. There are situations where that compatibility can be broken, but they tend to be edge cases. See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff602939.aspx

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